Aquamaxx Tank - Playing Around

A201

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I'm going with #4. Some well placed foliage both high & low, and the scape will look like a competition quality forest path.
 

stella1979

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Hey Sil! Haven't seen you around much lately. You might remember that I'm a fan of a forest path... still love the old Red Riding hood scape. Idk though, I like a mountain scape too. I vote for 1 or 4, lol, and would love to see what you do with either.

Hmm, I'm unsure about the large low rock on the left in pic 1. It doesn't match as well as the rest do so perhaps it needs a bath? Lol, I thought of you and all my other favorite scapers when I dropped rocks in muriatic acid for the first time a few weeks ago. Anyway, knowing you, we probably wouldn't notice slight rock variations once the tank is planted.
 
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Silister Trench

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I'm going with #4. Some well placed foliage both high & low, and the scape will look like a competition quality forest path.
You see, I was really set on a forest theme BUT the pieces of wood I currently have just felt lacking and the whole process just became more and more forced. The rocks I wanted to use weren't scaling well, and the pieces of driftwood didn't blend, but thanks for the vote of confidence.

Hey Sil! Haven't seen you around much lately. You might remember that I'm a fan of a forest path... still love the old Red Riding hood scape. Idk though, I like a mountain scape too. I vote for 1 or 4, lol, and would love to see what you do with either.

Hmm, I'm unsure about the large low rock on the left in pic 1. It doesn't match as well as the rest do so perhaps it needs a bath? Lol, I thought of you and all my other favorite scapers when I dropped rocks in muriatic acid for the first time a few weeks ago. Anyway, knowing you, we probably wouldn't notice slight rock variations once the tank is planted.
I'm on here and there, just every few days or so and I don't always say much of anything unless something interests me or someone mentions me.

That one very off looking rock? Yeah, it tricked me. Once I had everything set I used a paintbrush to clean the rocks before wetting it. They all matched until they were wet! The stone is black seiryu stone, all except that odd one out which is a stone from the Ozark mountains in Arkansas. Is didn't have a stone to immediately replace it so it's just there for now.

I want to try the stone layout - I think, perhaps, maybe, possibly - but I don't think I'm going to plant it in style of the iwagumi or mountain/aquascape. I definitely need to clean it up a bit. There's 9L of ADA Amazonia powder type in there. 9L is approx 20 lbs of substrate and likely another 16 lbs of stone.
 

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To me - the stone layout definitely has the most potential. Definitely needs a unique planting. Imo the rocks on the bottom left seem a little out of place and a little unnatural. Some details would also obviously help but i know you are still in the beginning stages. The other scapes look to forced like you said especially #3. Looking good overall though and can't wait to see what you do, it always seems like your soft scape absolutely transforms scapes in a completely different way.
 
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Silister Trench

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To me - the stone layout definitely has the most potential. Definitely needs a unique planting. Imo the rocks on the bottom left seem a little out of place and a little unnatural. Some details would also obviously help but i know you are still in the beginning stages. The other scapes look to forced like you said especially #3. Looking good overall though and can't wait to see what you do, it always seems like your soft scape absolutely transforms scapes in a completely different way.
Hey thanks for the vote of confidence, Culprit.

Rocks? We don't need to see no rocks! Okay, I mean... We need to see the rocks, but with the variety of plants I just dug out of my emmersed setup, well, I'm hoping the rocks become good supporting visuals to the plants. Despite the rocks being the only hardscape and visually strong at the moment, the plants are to be the main attractions.

I barely scratched the surface of my plant collection/stock. Some things are apt to be changed as it goes on, but I figured I'd just go for it. I seriously have way too many plants, and it may mean I have a problem...

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Silister Trench

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I feel like after it had been planted it began to make more sense as a layout
 
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Silister Trench

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Since the plants used were already adapted to emersed growth I thought it was beneficial in this setup to dry-start the tank and allow some of the plants to develope a roots before submersing it. It also allowed for some different photos of planting. Definitely planted heavily.

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Looking great so far. Are you using anything to hold the substrate back, besides rocks? I know some aquascapers do add more buffers, and some don't. I'm curious about your opinion.
 
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Silister Trench

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Looking great so far. Are you using anything to hold the substrate back, besides rocks? I know some aquascapers do add more buffers, and some don't. I'm curious about your opinion.
Glad you asked! I slipped clear acrylic substrate supports into the aqua soil right before the photo. Originally I didn't, but I'm going to tweak some of the stone (mainly the right side) before submerging. Since I'm using the dry start method they weren't needed since the plant roots would have kept everything in place and the stone is heavy enough to prevent the substrate from leveling.

Sometimes I do, sometimes not. It depends, really. If I had planted the tank and immediately filled it with water I would have used substrate supports from the start.
 
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Silister Trench

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So I played around with correcting the right side. Doesn't look quite accurate, but better nonetheless.

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scarface

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It looks a lot better, actually. Now that I'm seeing your second alteration and comparing the two, the former looked too balanced and even. This one looks more natural, but in a mindful way.
 
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Silister Trench

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Love it - every time I see a fern plant like this in a landscape photo or elsewhere I always try to come up with an aquatic plant with strong resemblance. So far I know of three plants with similar appearance, and I am planning on using the African Fern mini - most likely.

Nano tanks: Phoenix Moss (Giant)

10 Gallon - 30 Gallon: African Fern mini/ regular African Fern

Very large tanks: Water Wisteria (if kept groomed)

Terrestrial growth: Peacock Fern
 

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Silister Trench

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So... Yeah...

If you look at the original post, then this update it's obvious that I redid almost all the hardacape during the dry start. I found a bunch of really cool dark mountain stone on vacation, and decided to use this stone instead.

For reference, the space between the background in the layout and the surface of the water is 4.5 5 inches; the background plants have been cut very short or else I'd have to cut them back every few days. Also, keeping them short allowed the carpeting plants to benefit fom more direct light, to fill in areas thicker.

Tank: 9.1 Gallon 20" x 11" x 11"
Substrate: ADA Amazonia Light - Powder Type & Sand
Lighting: 2x Chihiros A-Series
Filtration: SunSun A602B
Co2: Injected/Co2 reactor/glass inflow & outflow
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Silister Trench

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I can see several tweaks to the layout that I need to make, but if anyone has criticism or adjustments that they see, feel free to point it out.
 
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Silister Trench

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Some chili rasboras or ember tetras would look fantastic in there with the cherry shrimp!

It looks great!
That's a great idea! I've been going back and forth on my head what species would do well in this size tank. I'd need to see if the store can order me chilli rasbora's.

Initially, I planned on pearl danio's, but their health has been poor recently, and they more or less stop shipping the pearls during winter in my area because of their weakened health.

Hopefully I can get some very small chilli rasbora's to take a final photo.
 
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