Aqua Hand's Salty Thread

Aqua Hands
  • #1
So, I managed to get my Biocube down to the basement and started to cycle it about 3 weekish ago. Its been cycled! I know I know I should have said something. I just didn't want to just incase of something went wrong. I have already moved the tank. I am going to stock in a week. I am making sure moving it is going to hold the cycle. The currents plans are

2* O. Clownfish
Neon Goby
Cleaner Shrimp
HiFin Goby
Pistol Shrimp
Pom Pom Crabs
Hammer Coral
Zoas
Elegance Corals
Frogspawn
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #2
I need a CUC
 
stella1979
  • #3
Awesome! Sounds like you're almost there.

Stocking looks good, just be sure to take it slow and easy. CUC should come first, so perhaps you could get them along with the goby to start? As for the clowns, I'd suggest getting them after the goby has settled in. It's best that they're young and from a tank they've already been sharing. This will increase the chances of them getting along and possibly pairing.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #4
Awesome! Sounds like you're almost there.

Stocking looks good, just be sure to take it slow and easy. CUC should come first, so perhaps you could get them along with the goby to start? As for the clowns, I'd suggest getting them after the goby has settled in. It's best that they're young and from a tank they've already been sharing. This will increase the chances of them getting along and possibly pairing.
Okay! I am most definitely taking it slowly. I want to have my goby in within 7-8 days. After a week of just him I will add my Pistol Shrimp. Within every new addition I will add MicroBacter7. I also have a question, Can I add Pom Pom Crabs?
 
stella1979
  • #6
Okay! I am most definitely taking it slowly. I want to have my goby in within 7-8 days. After a week of just him I will add my Pistol Shrimp. Within every new addition I will add MicroBacter7. I also have a question, Can I add Pom Pom Crabs?
Sure you can have a Pom Pom. I don't have any experience with them personally, but I have done some reading. The large majority of people report that they are completely harmless, but there's a chance of them going rogue. A few have reported that their Pom Pom started eating coral. This may happen if the crab somehow loses it's anemone 'hands' or it may just get a taste for softies... idk. Anyhow, this means that it may be reef safe, but you'll definitely want to keep an eye on things. I find this to be true with just about every crab available to us, but don't let it deter you. Plenty of folks keep crabs... I don't.

stella1979 Nart Culprit https://content.invisioncic.com/Mnanoreef/monthly_05_2010/post-26630-1272702348.jpg So, I've found one of these on my live rock I had bought yesterday. I pulled it out and then just threw it in some bleach. What is it? should I be worried?
EDIT: I used tweezers
Not sure. It kind of looks like an arm from a brittle star with the striping and the way it tapers. Brittle stars are harmless and great detritivores... meaning that they'll help keep the tank clean. Of course, I could be wrong. There are so many critters that I find it impossible to remember them all. I find LionFish Lair and Melev's Reef to be good sites for identification purposes.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
Not sure. It kind of looks like an arm from a brittle star with the striping and the way it tapers. Brittle stars are harmless and great detritivores... meaning that they'll help keep the tank clean. Of course, I could be wrong. There are so many critters that I find it impossible to remember them all. I find LionFish Lair and Melev's Reef to be good sites for identification purposes.
Opps, They are dead now.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
stella1979 I forgot about the whole toxins in zoas, they are off my list.
 
Culprit
  • #9
It does look like part of a brittle star to me too. I love mine, super cool to watch and great for the tank.

Looks good! Honestly you don't have to worry about it. Just put carbon in the tank after you frag them, make sure you have good ventilation and wear gloves, long sleeve shirt and pants, and face protection. I know Nanologist was fragging all kinds of zoas and palys all day and wore nothing but goggles I think
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
It does look like part of a brittle star to me too. I love mine, super cool to watch and great for the tank.

Looks good! Honestly you don't have to worry about it. Just put carbon in the tank after you frag them, make sure you have good ventilation and wear gloves, long sleeve shirt and pants, and face protection. I know Nanologist was fragging all kinds of zoas and palys all day and wore nothing but goggles I think
hmmm, I'm going to discuss with my family. anyways, I'm very excited to let the goby in next week, pictures soon!
 
Culprit
  • #11
I get it, my Dad freaked out after that news thing where the guy poisoned his whole family, they said it was cause of pulsing xenia well pulsing xenia doesn't have palytoxin... that guy was more then likely being a total idiot and scrubbing his rocks out of the tank, pulverising and aeraeting any palys, or boiling them. Some people are just stupid.
 
stella1979
  • #12
Opps, They are dead now.

You can't help what you didn't yet know. It's all a learning experience.

stella1979 I forgot about the whole toxins in zoas, they are off my list.
It's a personal choice, but I feel ok about zoas because I've researched and take the proper precautions. There is a ton of info available on the net on how to take care, but these horror stories in the news don't often share the details. Details which I believe would show that proper precaution wasn't taken. Just my opinion.

Scape plans look good.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
I get it, my Dad freaked out after that news thing where the guy poisoned his whole family, they said it was cause of pulsing xenia well pulsing xenia doesn't have palytoxin... that guy was more then likely being a total idiot and scrubbing his rocks out of the tank, pulverising and aeraeting any palys, or boiling them. Some people are just stupid.
You can't help what you didn't yet know. It's all a learning experience.


It's a personal choice, but I feel ok about zoas because I've researched and take the proper precautions. There is a ton of info available on the net on how to take care, but these horror stories in the news don't often share the details. Details which I believe would show that proper precaution wasn't taken. Just my opinion.

Scape plans look good.
My family and I have discussed it and we are going to get them. we are going to have the frags isolated though. Meaning it will not be attached to rock of any sort.

stella1979 Culprit I also saw some little red shrimp looking things on the LR darting around. I mean it could be measured in Millimeters. What could it be?

Edit: How should I feed? Since my tank has the builtin Sump the floating NLS pellets just go right into the sump. Should I finds some sinking pellets?
 
stella1979
  • #14
I usually turn the flow off during feeding. Also, yes to sinking foods as your average reef inhabitant eats from either the water column, the reef structure, or the bottom. I prefer frozen foods as a staple because pellets are loaded with nutrients, which isn't bad for your fish, but can make for a dirty system. Nitrates and phosphates tend to stay much lower when pellets aren't fed as a staple.

I'm unsure about your red dudes, but I hope it isn't red bugs.

Red Bugs - No More! | Melev's Reef
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
I usually turn the flow off during feeding. Also, yes to sinking foods as your average reef inhabitant eats from either the water column, the reef structure, or the bottom. I prefer frozen foods as a staple because pellets are loaded with nutrients, which isn't bad for your fish, but can make for a dirty system. Nitrates and phosphates tend to stay much lower when pellets aren't fed as a staple.

I'm unsure about your red dudes, but I hope it isn't red bugs.

Red Bugs - No More! | Melev's Reef
definitely not red bugs. They actually kinda look like copepods.
 
stella1979
  • #16
Well, that's good. Hmmm, idk but here's another reference I use. Perhaps it's just copepods, which is a good thing. I didn't know they could be red, but right here on the Hitchhiker's Guide, they show an of a red pod.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
Well, that's good. Hmmm, idk but here's another reference I use. Perhaps it's just copepods, which is a good thing. I didn't know they could be red, but right here on the Hitchhiker's Guide, they show an of a red pod.
yep! those are they creatures!
 
Culprit
  • #18
That's really cool! Never heard of red copepods.

You can soak those foods, and then feed them when they're stuck. However, quality frozen food is far better, as pellet and flake foods are full of extra nutrients that don't belong in a reef. Also, one packet of say frozen mysis shrimp will last a very long time. Mysis shrimp is my go-to frozen food. Nutrituios and everyone loves it.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #19
That's really cool! Never heard of red copepods.

You can soak those foods, and then feed them when they're stuck. However, quality frozen food is far better, as pellet and flake foods are full of extra nutrients that don't belong in a reef. Also, one packet of say frozen mysis shrimp will last a very long time. Mysis shrimp is my go-to frozen food. Nutrituios and everyone loves it.
I actually have some and feed about every teo days to some africans. Still half left after 3 months!
 
Culprit
  • #20
Another note, LPS and most softies love mysis.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #21
Another note, LPS and most softies love mysis.
Thanks! not sure of what my first coral will be but I'm going to make sure I like the look of it and I'm fully prepared.
 
Culprit
  • #22
Thanks! not sure of what my first coral will be but I'm going to make sure I like the look of it and I'm fully prepared.

A Duncan is an awesome beginners coral. Beautiful, flowy, and a voracious feedng response. They also grow really well.
 
Nanologist
  • #23
Honestly you don't have to worry about it. Just put carbon in the tank after you frag them, make sure you have good ventilation and wear gloves, long sleeve shirt and pants, and face protection. I know Nanologist was fragging all kinds of zoas and palys all day and wore nothing but goggles I think
Yep, just goggles. You just want to protect your eyes and mouth. If they squirt on your skin then just wash off with soap and water and you're good to go.

Also never burn or boil them because it will go airborne and you'll breathe it in. That can be very serious.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #24
Culprit So I was at my LFS, they are offered to sell me a damsel cheap to help me get use to keeping a saltwater tank, do yo think I should do that for like 2 weeks?
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #25
Culprit stella1979 So my dad has no self control and bought the following

*1 Lunar Wrasse (2ish Inches)
*1 Blue Devil Damsel
*3.5 Pounds of LR

Edit: I have talked to him and once we get corals he says we can get rid of them so I'm buying coral within 2 weeks. I mostly will wait 2 weeks atleast unless you think it will be fine.
 
stella1979
  • #26
Check your parameters... that will tell you if you're ready for a beginner coral. Be absolutely sure you are fully cycled, nitrates are low, and calcium, alkalinity, and magnesium are in the correct ranges.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #27
Check your parameters... that will tell you if you're ready for a beginner coral. Be absolutely sure you are fully cycled, nitrates are low, and calcium, alkalinity, and magnesium are in the correct ranges.
Yep, I'm going to make sure everything is perfect! I want to get use to saltwater before I start to rush into stuff. its so refreshing compared to freshwater where its so easy now its kinda boring. But saltwater U can wait to start to watch my corals grow and react, etc. I want to make sure I have fun!
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #28
stella1979 Running to the LFS later. going to pic up either more LR or coral stuff (Not actually just the frag stands, etc
 
Culprit
  • #29
Culprit So I was at my LFS, they are offered to sell me a damsel cheap to help me get use to keeping a saltwater tank, do yo think I should do that for like 2 weeks?

No, I wouldn't. Damsels are very aggressive, and you'd have to rehome if you wanted any other fish. Something like a Yellow watchman goby or clownfish would be just as hardy, but you can have other fish with. Although, I would wait until you've got all the other fish you'll want before adding clownfish. But, since you;ve already bought it, I guess it will be OK to keep the cycle going until you get corals and correct fish.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #30
Culprit stella1979 I sold the Damsel and put in a Coral Banded Shrimp. I also bought some hermit crabs. The LFS has a frag that's called watermelon something. god I hope nobody buys it . it looks like this
images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSeco9KP_Mr1bteXhNC5ZYP5GpHO1mw9zJpCHpQqbFimvIl2kkOKg.jpg
 
stella1979
  • #31
That looks like a favite or possibly a favia! Love those corals, and that one is a real beauty. Most corals in the family faviidae are pretty hardy and don't require the strongest lighting. This makes them great for beginners. They can be a little aggressive though, so keep that in mind when you decide where to place one of these.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #32
I will be placing this one on what I want to call middle with Medium flow. I have spots that have the following
Low light- low flow
low light- medium flow
low light- fast flow
medium light- low flow
medium light- medium flow
medium light- high flow
high light- adjustable to exactly what I need.
That looks like a favite or possibly a favia! Love those corals, and that one is a real beauty. Most corals in the family faviidae are pretty hardy and don't require the strongest lighting. This makes them great for beginners. They can be a little aggressive though, so keep that in mind when you decide where to place one of these.
 
stella1979
  • #33
Hrmmm, light and flow are sometimes hard for me to talk about because I figure everyone's tank is different. I'd say that I have my favias and favites in mid-low light and mid flow. Of course, what is considered low light in one tank can be wildly different than it is in another depending on the light itself. If we want to get specific about lighting, we need to talk about PAR values... and I don't have a PAR meter, nor am I the best to talk to about lighting in general. Like most corals, favias and favites will lose color if they are not provided with enough light. I would say that mine do well in indirect lighting, as they are all either at the far ends of the tank or at the bottom, almost under a ledge. They are not shaded, just not in any hot spots.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #34
Hrmmm, light and flow are sometimes hard for me to talk about because I figure everyone's tank is different. I'd say that I have my favias and favites in mid-low light and mid flow. Of course, what is considered low light in one tank can be wildly different than it is in another depending on the light itself. If we want to get specific about lighting, we need to talk about PAR values... and I don't have a PAR meter, nor am I the best to talk to about lighting in general. Like most corals, favias and favites will lose color if they are not provided with enough light. I would say that mine do well in indirect lighting, as they are all either at the far ends of the tank or at the bottom, almost under a ledge. They are not shaded, just not in any hot spots.
hmmm, I believe I have the perfect spot!. should I remove it off of the frag? or should I let it grow before I take it off.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #35
Check your parameters... that will tell you if you're ready for a beginner coral. Be absolutely sure you are fully cycled, nitrates are low, and calcium, alkalinity, and magnesium are in the correct ranges.
all are in check but, i'm waiting another week atleast more likely 2 weeks!
 
stella1979
  • #36
I like to let a frag settle in for a week or two before putting it through any additional stress, so I don't recommend taking it off the plug right away. Also, depending on the type of coral, you might never need to remove it. Favias are pretty good art hiding the plug once they've grown.

All that said, I can't stand seeing a plug on my scape, so if you need to deplug it, do it before it has too much time to grow. Once a coral overgrows the plug and begins to grow down the side edges... Well, it becomes difficult to deplug it without causing some damage.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #37
I like to let a frag settle in for a week or two before putting it through any additional stress, so I don't recommend taking it off the plug right away. Also, depending on the type of coral, you might never need to remove it. Favias are pretty good art hiding the plug once they've grown.

All that said, I can't stand seeing a plug on my scape, so if you need to deplug it, do it before it has too much time to grow. Once a coral overgrows the plug and begins to grow down the side edges... Well, it becomes difficult to deplug it without causing some damage.
Ok, I will just leave it. just for future reference though, I just use a razor blade?
 
Culprit
  • #38
Ok, I will just leave it. just for future reference though, I just use a razor blade?

Yes, just kind of work around the edges, gradually getting deeper and deeper. Be careful not to hold the coral too tightly as you could crush it.
 
stella1979
  • #39
Yep. When a coral is fragged it is attached to a plug using glue or epoxy. Generally I try to deplug before it covers the glue because that layer of adhesive is where I'm working the razor to separate the coral from the plug.

I was really nervous about this process at first, and am just a nervy person anyway. My hands shake at the slightest thing, and this can be a delicate process. I did break a frag in half once, but it healed back together once it was mounted and grew in. Like anything, you'll get a feel for it and be a pro before long. I just did 6 corals last week... without any upsets and with calm hands, lol.
 
Aqua Hands
  • Thread Starter
  • #40
Thank you guys! I'm thinking about buying the coral but having them keep it for like an extra $5
Yep. When a coral is fragged it is attached to a plug using glue or epoxy. Generally I try to deplug before it covers the glue because that layer of adhesive is where I'm working the razor to separate the coral from the plug.

I was really nervous about this process at first, and am just a nervy person anyway. My hands shake at the slightest thing, and this can be a delicate process. I did break a frag in half once, but it healed back together once it was mounted and grew in. Like anything, you'll get a feel for it and be a pro before long. I just did 6 corals last week... without any upsets and with calm hands, lol.
Yes, just kind of work around the edges, gradually getting deeper and deeper. Be careful not to hold the coral too tightly as you could crush it.
 

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