Api Master Kit

  1. fishgame6 Member Member

    i have a 7 gallon with 2 bettas its cycled heated filterd the person at the store told me not to bother with it but should i get 1
     
  2. FishFish221 Well Known Member Member

    It is highly recommended to get one. Two bettas also cannot live with each other in a tank that size or they will fight to the death unless it is divided
     

  3. fishgame6 Member Member

    it has a divider
     
  4. JesseMoreira06 Well Known Member Member

    you should diffinetly get one , you'll need to do water test every so often to make sure parameters are in check.
     

  5. xMoodyPrincess Initiate Member

    I wound up buying a 10g for each of my betta because it cost the same as a 5g, and it's more asthetically pleasing than any divider.
    Does the filtered water reach both sides or is the other continually a little stagnant? You might want two sponge filters. Awesome that you got a heater. If you're going to keep a fish, it's comfort should be a high priority.
     
  6. FreshWaters Member Member

    I'm fairly new started early this year fishkeeping and have had great success using no test kits at all,I've had a few losses but nowhere near as much as they say is average especially for a beginner. Mind you I did my homework 10 times for each subject of the hobby. I visually and mentally keep an eye on my fish, understand the tank size,fish size and count,type of fish and how much filtration I'm running. I've been lucky enough to keep up with weekly or every week and a half doing water changes at different amounts depending if I'm doing it sooner or later. My fish are happy,they mate,play,interact with me and show awesome colors. Do your homework and get MANY opinions because I've see strict and freestyle tanks succeed and fail....not every tank is the same so its good to have different references before making fast moves. Good luck.
     
  7. BottomDweller Fishlore VIP Member

    Without a test kit you never know if a new tank is cycled, you don't know if there is ammonia/nitrite/nitrate in your tap water and you often don't know about bad water quality until it is too late. It certainly does no harm to get one.
     

  8. ChiefBrody Member Member

    Where it's a small tank it's better to know for sure but where it's for betta I mean they can and do live in a mud puddle in the wild so the guy at the store was in his way looking out for your interests in not spending money you don't have to buy chances are you'll be putting other fish in there some day so it's not a bad thing to have on hand
     
  9. BottomDweller Fishlore VIP Member

    Bettas can and do live in mud puddles ?!? You mean huge rice paddies right
     
  10. ChiefBrody Member Member

    Even just small puddles. They're extremely resilient/tough as we know. My uncle's neighbors were from Vietnam and they said they're fairly common over there. These guys also kept them as fighting fish to gamble with. My idiot uncle lost a few fish and a few bets hanging out with em. They really tear each other apart. I'm glad they're making a comeback with the whole nano thing. They make a great centerpiece. Definitely some BAMF's

    They tolerate low oxygen which is why they sell them in those little jars at the pet store so yeah dude - mud puddles. They're more closely related to the lung fish / snakeheads that sorta thing. Ancient, dino-type fish
     

  11. jmaldo Well Known Member Member

    This is a quote from wiki "Bettas are anabantoids, which means they can breathe atmospheric air using a unique organ called the labyrinth. This accounts for their ability to thrive in low-oxygen water conditions that would kill most other fish, such as rice paddies, slow-moving streams, drainage ditches, and large puddles"
     
  12. ChiefBrody Member Member

    Anabantoids exactly. I couldn't think of the name off hand. Definitely the coolest fish - sorry I'm an oddballer from way back!
     
  13. jmaldo Well Known Member Member

    Oops, forgot to add. Agree with @BottomDweller and most everyone. The test kit is essential. If you have any problems with your wet pets and want help, the first question will be
    "What are your water parameters?" Without the info it is very difficult to help.
     
  14. davis Member Member

    The test kit is the only way to know for sure where your water is at. If you watch your fish long enough their behavior will tell you when a problem exists if they are not acting normal (you need to know what normal is takes time) then test water to learn why. I only test when my fish tell me to, but would not think of not having the test kit to explore problems.
     
  15. FreshWaters Member Member

    I agree with Davis,watch your fish and let them tell you when to use it but don't buy it to use all the time just to know the parameters. And if all your fish instead of just 1 start flopping belly up you know its water,if its just one fish acting sluggish my mind might say the environment is OK but he personally is sick and has nothing to do with the water. Good luck keeping freshwaters.
     
  16. OnTheFly Well Known Member Member

    There will eventually come a day when something bad happens and you need to test your water quick. You'll pay a lot more for the kit locally if you can't wait for shipping.
     
  17. Nart Well Known Member Member

    You can always do the taste method when in doubt. Stick in a straw and start tasting it. If it taste gross, it's probably time for a water change.

    Kidding :)

    The test kit isn't 100% needed. Probably 80% recommended, it's just good to know your water supply and test your nitrates from time to time as well.
    Also, helps you understand the fish game better. Talking about being radddddddd! "Girl, I can tell you what your tap water is at any day! Like, for reals, let me test your tap water" :D
     
  18. fishgame6 Member Member

    ok thanks everyone