Anyone know what this is?

Mattjames

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Hello hello!

I was wondering if anyone knows what type of algae growth these are and what about my water caused it to grow. I want to assume it’s Blackbeard algae but I don’t really know.

Also, aside from trimming it off if there is any way to remove it. Maybe some fish that eat it?

In this 55 lives:

11 bettas
17 neon tetras
2 black skirt tetras
2 upside down catfish
2 bristle nose plecos
1 sail fin molly

Thanks in advance for any information!
 

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Demeter

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That's a java fern and the little hairs are just the root systems of baby plantlets. That's how java ferns reproduce, by growing new plants from the nodes on the underside of mature leaves.
 
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Mattjames

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Demeter said:
That's a java fern and the little hairs are just the root systems of baby plantlets. That's how java ferns reproduce, by growing new plants from the nodes on the underside of mature leaves.
Thanks! What about the other plant in the first picture. The stuff growing off look different then on the java fern?
 

Dennis57

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The 1st picture, the green and white plant is a semi aquatic plant, and the leaves should not be under water.
 
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Mattjames

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Dennis57 said:
The 1st picture, the green and white plant is a semi aquatic plant, and the leaves should not be under water.
Thanks for the reply, I did know that. I have multiple of those plants in my aquariums and they are doing just fine. It’s the one next to it in question.
 

Dch48

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That plant is also a species of Java Fern called a Windelov. It reproduces in the same way the other one does.
 
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Mattjames

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Dch48 said:
That plant is also a species of Java Fern called a Windelov. It reproduces in the same way the other one does.
thank you dch48!
 
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Mattjames

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Demeter said:
That's a java fern and the little hairs are just the root systems of baby plantlets. That's how java ferns reproduce, by growing new plants from the nodes on the underside of mature leaves.
Would I be able to take the roots and new plants off and replant? How big should the plantlets be before I do that?
 

AquaEmptiness

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Would I be able to take the roots and new plants off and replant? How big should the plantlets be before I do that?
After roots, leaves will be developed. You can take them off the "mother" leaf when they're big enough to be attached somewhere. You can also let the leaf die off and release all the babies into the tank, like what happens in nature. But you'll find some of them stuck in the filter intake. Once you feel they're big enough that you can handle them, you can break them off the leave (be sure to damage the leaf, not the plantlets).
 

AquaEmptiness

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I'm currently keeping a loose Java Fern "Windelov" leaf in a glass of water to see if it will just die or attempt to reproduce. I'm starting to get a fuzzy edge. It seems promising. The second leaf still has a tiny bit of rizome, and I think it'll be fine, but it's also growing tiny roots. So it can go either way.
 

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AquaEmptiness

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As for the brown algae, it if it brown algae, it's not harmful to fish. It could be caused by an imbalance in nutrients in the tank. Honestly, I find it impossible to measure each and every nutrient in the water. If you're already providing good care to your plants, I recommend scrubbing the algae off before water changes, and making the water changes more frequent (like 20% up to 3 times a week, to get as much algae out). Reducing hours of light can be helpful (but not for brown algae, as it's not really algae, just looks like it). I'm currently fighting green hair algae in my tank, so lights only go on for about 8 hours a day. The algae came from plants I bought online, but they're thriving now. :mad: Is there any change you have recently done that could be the cause?
 

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