Anyone Here Like To Cook/bake?

Geoff

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ryanr said:
(Stop press, not a Gordon dish tonight)
Maggie Beer’s pepper crusted/vino cotto eye fillet with duck fat potatoes and roast broccoli & cauliflower.

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'

Recipes:
Eye fillet : Slow-cooked fillet of beef with crushed black pepper and balsamic
Note: her recipe is a long slow cook, but I did it at 180c for about 45 minutes (till 55C internal temp). Also, the original recipe (in her book) calls for Vino Cotto, not Balsamic Vinegar, Balsamic as a substitute. I used Vino Cotto, but 4-leaf Balsamic would work just as well. 1 or 2 leaf balsamic would not work as well IMHO.

Veggies, nothing special. Just roast veggies, methods mentioned in previous posts.
Oh the pink on that meat. Perfection.
 

YATT

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So, last day. Back to work tomorrow. Simple steak. Porterhouse, borderline t-bone

DA5A8AC3-DF69-458B-96D8-AC64DCABC848.jpeg


Crusty!
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Borderline rare near the bone, yum!
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ryanr

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YATT said:
So, last day. Back to work tomorrow. Simple steak. Porterhouse, borderline t-bone

Borderline rare near the bone, yum!
We had a long weekend here (Queen's b'day), and not looking forward to work tomorrow {Public holiday here in Aus, I think the UK call it a bank holiday, not sure in the US, but we had Monday off! }
IMHO - Rather slightly rare at the bone for me, than medium through the fillet. Good job @YATT looks perfect to me, nice and juicy and tender. Cooking on the bone is always tough to get 100% perfect, even finishing in an oven. Only thing I learnt, allow plenty of time to bring it to room temp, especially when doing bone in.
My only complaint - you had a flame grill and didn't use it.... Sorry, can't have you here in Aus mate, that's not a proper BBQ... Even for a Texan you're pushing it bahahahaha
Seriously though, looks good. That crust though.... how'd you do that? I always manage a crust, but never a "shield". Very impressed mate.

Geoff said:
Oh the pink on that meat. Perfection.
That was after 30mins resting too, so I was really happy with it. I found an awesome guide for cooking/roasting meat, and when to pull it out of the oven to ensure after resting, it's still where you want it.

PSA - Marco Pierre White's meat cooking guide https://www.knorr.com/ie/a-world-of-flavour/tips-and-tricks/temperature-guide.html
 

YATT

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ryanr said:
My only complaint - you had a flame grill and didn't use it.... Sorry, can't have you here in Aus mate, that's not a proper BBQ... Even for a Texan you're pushing it bahahahaha
Seriously though, looks good. That crust though.... how'd you do that? I always manage a crust, but never a "shield". Very impressed mate.
It’s a double edge sword. I get the crust by using the cast iron directly on the burner. I preheat it a good 10 min. You can see how hot it is by all the smoke coming off the steak. You wouldn’t want to cook this inside. That is the only way to get that crust on my grille. It is gas and the grates are to far away to use direct fire. Also when cooking the fatty ribeye it keeps the flare ups down. Now if I get a true wood bbq, I could get it hot enough with the right charcoal.
 

ryanr

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So being that it's winter here, and the temperatures are barely getting to 15C/60F during the day, and sub 7C/45F at night, it's time to make soups and comfort food.

I stumbled across a great collection of 46 soup recipes


Last night I tried the Hot & Sour Chicken and pumpkin soup, and it was absolutely delicious.
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Actual specific recipe from above collection (it's a Jamie Oliver recipe)
https://www.delicious.com.au/recipes/chicken-pumpkin-hot-sour-soup-jamie-oliver/wgmtscjr?r=recipes/collections/46restorativesouprecipestomakewhenyourefeelingrundown
 

YATT

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Those soup recipes look insanely good @ryanr

Don’t think I’ll be finding Queensland Blue pumpkin around me though.

The pumpkin, pear and bear sounds awesome as well as most of the others. Bookmarked and thanks!
 

ryanr

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YATT said:
Those soup recipes look insanely good @ryanr

Don’t think I’ll be finding Queensland Blue pumpkin around me though.

The pumpkin, pear and bear sounds awesome as well as most of the others. Bookmarked and thanks!
Cheers @YATT
The delicious.com.au website has lots of 'collections' of recipes.

I couldn't find Queensland Blue pumpkin, in fact I've never seen it here in Melbourne.
I used Butternut Pumpkin, probably a little sweeter, but still worked (I think US calls them butternut squash?)

Apparently the Queensland Blue is also known as the Winter Squash, which I assume is an American term. You could also use Kent pumpkin

There's also a good collection of 150 odd slow-cooker meals on a website called taste.com.au
https://www.taste.com.au/galleries/every-single-slow-cooker-recipe-you-could-possibly-need/tslp60ot
 

smee82

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I remembered to bookmark this thread this time. I keep losing it.

Had visitors for dinner the other night so i spend the day in the kitchen.

Slow cooked whole pork ribs in the oven, carbonara, roast potatoes, a chinese egg and celery dish, honey soy chicken and a salad with home grown lettuce.

My daughter loved her 1st rib to chew on and ended up eating 2.

Also a bonus pic of the garlic roast beef i cooked last friday. Normally i do a roast topside but my wife brought the wrong cut home, i cant for the life of me remember what she brought home but it wasn't too bad.
 

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Cold&warm

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ryanr said:
@Cold&warm - grazie mille, e sorry, I've just seen your response. You can get duck in Italy. Fiorenza e Roma are places I saw it in the supermarket. But also, duck is such a big ingredient in France (foie gras), that I would be very surprised if you couldn't get it in most of Europe. England is also a big producer of duck.

EDIT: And the recipe above would work great with chicken (pollo) too. Obviously the cooking method for chicken is different, but you could do skin-on breast or thighs and have crispy skin chicken
Thanks for your reply.
I answer with 2 months delay: from April 30th until yesterday June 29th I had no computer.
Florence and Rome are very far away from my little world. I have been in Florence with a mostly Hispanic/Latino group who had taken me along for the Italian Language. That was three years ago and the only time since I came here. Rome is also half a day traveling away.

To console myself I did finally go to the Chinese restaurant. The duck was good. But my budget does not allow me to get it often.
The chutney recipy you gave me last year was a success.
Would you have an equally elementary recipy for pork in sweet & sour sauce? I tried the sweet and sour the restaurant serves in three versions: pork, chicken and duck. I liked the pork most.
These days there seems to be a surplus of meat: all local supermarkets offer pork, beef, chicken at exceptionally low prices.
 

ryanr

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Cold&warm said:
s.
Would you have an equally elementary recipy for pork in sweet & sour sauce? I tried the sweet and sour the restaurant serves in three versions: pork, chicken and duck. I liked the pork most.
There's lots of versions of sweet and sour, the most common is the Cantonese version, with deep fried battered pieces of meat (typically chicken or pork)
There's equally plenty of different recipes out there.
One of the most 'authentic' versions is not really 'elementary', but this recipe is worth a go https://rasamalaysia.com/sweet-and-sour-pork/ I've done it before, but it's a bit of an effort, with a lot of components but worth it. Of course you could skip the deep frying part, but it wouldn't be the same, the batter helps hold the sauce.

A much simpler version is this one https://rasamalaysia.com/sweet-and-sour-pork-noodles/

I also have a simple authentic Singaporean recipe:
60mL (1/4 cup) white vinegar
190mL (3/4 cup) pineapple of orange juice
1 tbsp sugar
pinch of salt
pinch of red colouring powder or a drop or two of red food dye (if you want the red tinge)
1 tbsp arrowroot (or substitute with 1.5 tbsp of tapioca, or 2 and a bit teaspoons cornflour)

Add vinegar, juice, sugar and salt to saucepan. Slowly add colouring (if using) till slightly pink
Bring to a boil, remove from heat.
Mix arrowroot with 1tbsp of water and mix to a smooth paste/slurry
Add to pan, return to heat. Stir until sauce boils and thickens
 

Cold&warm

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ryanr said:
There's lots of versions of sweet and sour, the most common is the Cantonese version, with deep fried battered pieces of meat (typically chicken or pork)
There's equally plenty of different recipes out there.
One of the most 'authentic' versions is not really 'elementary', but this recipe is worth a go https://rasamalaysia.com/sweet-and-sour-pork/ I've done it before, but it's a bit of an effort, with a lot of components but worth it. Of course you skip the deep frying part, but it wouldn't be the same, the batter helps hold the sauce.

A much simpler version is this one https://rasamalaysia.com/sweet-and-sour-pork-noodles/

I also have a simple authentic Singaporean recipe:
60mL (1/4 cup) white vinegar
190mL (3/4 cup) pineapple of orange juice
1 tbsp sugar
pinch of salt
pinch of red colouring powder or a drop or two of red food dye (if you want the red tinge)
1 tbsp arrowroot (or substitute with 1.5 tbsp of tapioca, or 2 and a bit teaspoons cornflour)

Add vinegar, juice, sugar and salt to saucepan. Slowly add colouring (if using) till slightly pink
Bring to a boil, remove from heat.
Mix arrowroot with 1tbsp of water and mix to a smooth paste/slurry
Add to pan, return to heat. Stir until sauce boils and thickens
Thank you!
As usual, I'll go for the simplest - i.e. Singaporean - option.
By chance yesterday in the supermarket I picked up a bottle of ananas juice another customer had left in the meat department.
Tapioca and cornflour - I'm afraid - are to be found no closer than Rome. Lately there are some African refugees in town. I'll ask them. Otherwise, what about wheat flour? We have soft and durum wheat - I'm in the heart of "pastaland" .

smee82 said:
I remembered to bookmark this thread this time. I keep losing it.

Had visitors for dinner the other night so i spend the day in the kitchen.

Slow cooked whole pork ribs in the oven, carbonara, roast potatoes, a chinese egg and celery dish, honey soy chicken and a salad with home grown lettuce.

My daughter loved her 1st rib to chew on and ended up eating 2.

Also a bonus pic of the garlic roast beef i cooked last friday. Normally i do a roast topside but my wife brought the wrong cut home, i cant for the life of me remember what she brought home but it wasn't too bad.
That's quite a rib to chew on, she sure gets a good start.
Do you people get a lot of sun over there? We have 3-4 Chinese shops, but the people there do not display the sun tan that can be seen in the last picture.
BTW nice big tank you got there, with lush vegetation.
Two weeks ago I pulled the plugs of the heaters of my 2 tanks out of the socket.
I have 1 male guppy in one of them. Got the impression the water was getting too hot for him at 26C. I cool in a very elementary, "Chinese" so to speak, way: plastic milk bottles filled with tap water and frozen hard in the deep-freeze compartment of my fridge.
 

ryanr

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Cold&warm said:
Otherwise, what about wheat flour? We have soft and durum wheat - I'm in the heart of "pastaland" .
Hmmm, according to google, "2 tablespoons wheat flour = 1 tablespoon cornstarch = 1 tablespoon tapioca = 4 1/2 teaspoons arrowroot = 1 1/2 tsp. potato starch"
In sauces, they're used as a thickening agent. So I guess wheat flour might work.

There's no rules in cooking (except baking cakes), so give it a go. All I know is that when making a thickening agent, use cold water, mix the 'agent'/flour and make a slurry/paste, then add to sauce. Adding the flour directly to hot will result in lumps and an inconsistent texture.

Follow that rule,and your sauce may not be the exact same as a restaurant, but it won't be lumpy and yucky, and will still be delicious. Same applies to making a proper gravy from meat juices. And remember, you can add the slurry slowly, you don't have to use the whole amount if it means your sauce gets too thick.

Don't be afraid to try stuff out... ohhh, and BTW, here's tonight's very simple Hoisin Chicken stir fry

Recipe: that I doubled, cos I'm a piggy hahaha Hoisin Chicken (Taste Like Chinese Restaurants!) - Rasa Malaysia
 

Cold&warm

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Thank you.
It seems to me that during the 2 months of my forced absence from the site the pictures - not only yours - have become professional.
Complimenti.
I felt a little funny when I read that in your place it is winter and cold: 15C. What a luxury, even in the Mediterranean in winter it is much colder than that - in case you forgot, haha.
Did I understand correctly that you recommend to pass the meat through a batter (water&flour?) and fry it and then add the sauce?
I'm going tno try it right now. At 15:48 no lunch yet, so I real hungry.

Edit-update: couldn't find the flour, must have misplaced it. Used an Asian powder for ginger drink instead. It did the job ...
 

ryanr

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Cold&warm said:
the pictures - not only yours - have become professional.
Complimenti.
Did I understand correctly that you recommend to pass the meat through a batter (water&flour?) and fry it and then add the sauce?
Haha, and I'm using an old phone to take the photos, nothing 'professional' on my side, but presentation of a dish is important. Mind you, I did forget to garnish with fresh spring onion, but never mind.
If you're going to batter and deep fry the meat, it needs to be done before adding to the wok/skillet and prior to adding sauce. But you can skip the batter and deep frying, and sear the meat first in the wok.

PonzLL said:
First brisket!
Ohhh, nice! Nice smoke ring too !
 

Cold&warm

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smee82 said:
Had a real bad bout of food poisoning last week and couldnt keep anything down.
Very sorry to hear that.
Does the millennia-old Chinese medicine offer any comfort, combined with your own action in the kitchen?
 

smee82

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Cold&warm said:
Very sorry to hear that.
Does the millennia-old Chinese medicine offer any comfort, combined with your own action in the kitchen?
My wife made traditional chinese medicine for me as she is a doctor and it is seriously the most disgusting thing ive ever had. Chinese medicine tastes that bad you get better just so you dont have to have anymore.
 
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