Anyone here into automotive restoration of any kind? I have a boat I want to start cleaning up.

MrBryan723

Member
So I bought this boat something like 6 years ago for $400. I'm the 3rd owner, the 2nd owners dad was the original owner. It's a 1958 Duracraft 15' with an Evenrude 35 lark golden jubilee. When I got it, I re did the electrical and got the motor running. Prior to this, the last time it was used was 1988. I was 2.
Anyways, I decided to get back to working on it, and I'm in the happy world of cosmetics i was hoping someone here might have a clue about.
How to I restore the windshield, and how do I repaint this buggar?
It's an aluminum hull and a plexiglass windscreen.
 

Fishproblem

Member
MrBryan723 said:
So I bought this boat something like 6 years ago for $400. I'm the 3rd owner, the 2nd owners dad was the original owner. It's a 1958 Duracraft 15' with an Evenrude 35 lark golden jubilee. When I got it, I re did the electrical and got the motor running. Prior to this, the last time it was used was 1988. I was 2.
Anyways, I decided to get back to working on it, and I'm in the happy world of cosmetics i was hoping someone here might have a clue about.
How to I restore the windshield, and how do I repaint this buggar?
It's an aluminum hull and a plexiglass windscreen.
Total Boat sells an aluminum boat paint - great brand, can't go wrong. (Though a lot of people do just use whatever rattle cans they have around for jonboats.) Can't help too much with the windscreen, though I imagine you'd want new plexi cut to fit using the old as templates, and just screw it in place.
(I'm restoring and rebuilding a 1970 Sears Gamefisher as a flats boat right now - enjoy the project!)
 

Betta'sAnonymous

Member
I am more into the things that make stuff run than the cosmetic aspects.

"She may not look like much, but she's got it where it counts, kid"
 
  • Thread Starter

MrBryan723

Member
I'll look into Total Boat for some paint. The windacreen is molded so I'll have to get someone to fabricate one if i can't repair it. Was thinking some acrylic shavings and MEK for the bad cracks, and lots of sanding for the shallow ones. Hopefully the yellowing won't show up too bad lol.
Haha me too, which is why i started with the mechanical and electric, and had to make sure she floated.
 

JayAlva

Member
Break out another thousand
 

Mhamilton0911

Member
MrBryan723 said:
and how do I repaint this buggar?
Hubs owns an autobody business. I have worked with him for 15+ years now. Over the years many have come through asking for full restos' on boats wanting the cheapest Macco work. Cheap doesn't last. Auto finishes can be used ABOVE the water line, but gel coat must be used below the water line. You can use automotive colors, base coats, flakes and such, but must be coated with a clear get coat to be waterproof long term. Anything inside or above water line can be a quality auto clearcoat.
 

John58ford

Member
I'm into this on a little smaller scale, I have a '61 Canadian model Crestliner aluminum boat, we tow it around behind my '69 ford usually and when we go to a lake big enough (lots of electric only puddles to fish over here) we take a '52 Evinrude lightwin with us. I have a '58 ford I had set up for racing back 20 years ago "resting" in the trailer for the last 15 years I may set back up to play toy boats with too. The combo is a hit at the lakes and smaller local car shows.

My old boat is tiller/Jon style without a console so I can't say too much on restoring the wood bits and details you may have but I can say at that vintage, don't soak any "plastic" longer than required as it's likely bakelite or similar and may swell so much it won't fit back in place.

I can speak to the old curved windshield a little from a different project though.
3M makes a product I have used on old lexan, it's the "novus 7100" 3 stage kit, it's the only one I have had luck with restoring lenses and lighting covers consistently. I would start by testing it on both sides of the windshield near a corner so you can see clearly through it. If you have a yellow/off white tint, you aren't going to be able to do a standard restoration and should look into how to heat and bend acrylic, it's not super hard if the metal frame is in decent shape and the original windscreen is still in one piece to use as a guide.

On the painting it side of things, I don't have practical experience at that yet. My automotive experience is with steel, and it's a different process than aluminum with different, specialized primers. I just happened to get lucky with my paint. My grandfather purchased this truck new, my family has sold it back and forth to each other as we have come up for uses for it, when I got ahold of it, I ended up repainting it the stock colors. Then, several years later we were left this little boat by my wife's grandfather, they just happen to match, though after a few years of very heavy use, I am also looking into a fresh coat of paint. I have done a modern style interior carpet/foam sub decking, and upholstered the seats but I haven't touched the outside yet. An old timer or two who I believe may know what they are talking about cautioned me not to use stripper (I had thought about using "aircraft aluminum stripper") when I'm ready as it is known to eat whatever the gaskets were made of when they riveted aluminum in the late 50's-70's. Is the duracraft riveted too? I'll be watching your build here and may borrow some of the advice you get on paint.

Here's my normal ride to the lakes:

The Evinrude will not be restored in it's original colors, whenever I get to the boat, I will be painting the engine to match.
 
  • Thread Starter

MrBryan723

Member
John58ford said:
I'm into this on a little smaller scale, I have a '61 Canadian model Crestliner aluminum boat, we tow it around behind my '69 ford usually and when we go to a lake big enough (lots of electric only puddles to fish over here) we take a '52 Evinrude lightwin with us. I have a '58 ford I had set up for racing back 20 years ago "resting" in the trailer for the last 15 years I may set back up to play toy boats with too. The combo is a hit at the lakes and smaller local car shows.

My old boat is tiller/Jon style without a console so I can't say too much on restoring the wood bits and details you may have but I can say at that vintage, don't soak any "plastic" longer than required as it's likely bakelite or similar and may swell so much it won't fit back in place.

I can speak to the old curved windshield a little from a different project though.
3M makes a product I have used on old lexan, it's the "novus 7100" 3 stage kit, it's the only one I have had luck with restoring lenses and lighting covers consistently. I would start by testing it on both sides of the windshield near a corner so you can see clearly through it. If you have a yellow/off white tint, you aren't going to be able to do a standard restoration and should look into how to heat and bend acrylic, it's not super hard if the metal frame is in decent shape and the original windscreen is still in one piece to use as a guide.

On the painting it side of things, I don't have practical experience at that yet. My automotive experience is with steel, and it's a different process than aluminum with different, specialized primers. I just happened to get lucky with my paint. My grandfather purchased this truck new, my family has sold it back and forth to each other as we have come up for uses for it, when I got ahold of it, I ended up repainting it the stock colors. Then, several years later we were left this little boat by my wife's grandfather, they just happen to match, though after a few years of very heavy use, I am also looking into a fresh coat of paint. I have done a modern style interior carpet/foam sub decking, and upholstered the seats but I haven't touched the outside yet. An old timer or two who I believe may know what they are talking about cautioned me not to use stripper (I had thought about using "aircraft aluminum stripper") when I'm ready as it is known to eat whatever the gaskets were made of when they riveted aluminum in the late 50's-70's. Is the duracraft riveted too? I'll be watching your build here and may borrow some of the advice you get on paint.

Here's my normal ride to the lakes:

The Evinrude will not be restored in it's original colors, whenever I get to the boat, I will be painting the engine to match.
That. Is. Awesome. So my paint scheme will be baby/sky blue and white. And i was thinking of picking up an old 58 model truck and paint to match. I found some good bottom paint on total boat sales I'll pick up after i strip the rest of the hull. Still gotta pull off the motor and find a place i can get it flipped over tho. I'll post some pictures when i get back to my shop.
 

Fishproblem

Member
John58ford is totally right about the windscreen resto - actually, I had AWESOME results restoring my headlights recently that would probably work as well. wet sand with 8000 grit, to 5000 grit, to 2000 grit, then polish. For best shine, I hit it with a UV protectant clearcoat and then sanded with 2000 grit and polished again. Clearcoat might not hold up well to salt though, so buyer beware there.
 
  • Thread Starter

MrBryan723

Member
Some pictures of the windscreen and motor and inside.
 

John58ford

Member
MrBryan723 said:
Some pictures of the windscreen and motor and inside.
That little flare at the bottom of the window might make it much harder to bend a piece of acrilic to make a fake. The corners/wrap around are pretty easy using a heat gun and some patience; I've only done simple bends before though, adding a second compound bend the long way across to screw down would require allot more heat than I know how to do. I would bet someone could make you one, still though. Could always start with the wet sanding as described by Fishproblem, then move into the novus stuff after you have taken a good but of the material off. I would just worry about the return on the time spent vs possible cost if it ends up needing to be replaced.

I think I saw either the deluxe version of that boat or maybe one a couple years newer at a lake recently. For some reason I imagined duracrafts having Cadillac style vertical tails.

Very cool project!
 

Zach72202

Member
I haven't really gotten into any restoration yet, but I have gotten my feet wet I would suppose. I would like to get an old ford truck to restore as a summer vehicle, but being that I am a 20 year old college student, that isn't anytime soon for me!

I do on the other hand own a 1953 Harley-Davidson ST-165, or Hummer as they were known, little single cylinder two stroke bike! I bought it after the previous owner had redone all the chrome and powder coated the gas tank, frame, etc...The bike runs, but the bushings that hold the handlebars are a work in progress. Not to mention when I got it I had to redo all of the wiring (from original!) but it came with a brand new wiring kit and all the part books! Real slick bike, I plan to use it as like a 'trailer queen' for shows and cruising around town when I can. Biggest problem is most of my time and money is tied up in living away for college at the moment!

I also (as I live in Michigan) have an interest in the Antique and Vintage snowmobiles here in the state. I own a 1988 Sno-Scoot and a 1968 SnowBug, but I don't really have images of those. Neat little machines, getting really hard to find though.

This was the day I bought my Harley-Davidson - only suspension is the springs under the seat and small springs in the forks!
 
  • Thread Starter

MrBryan723

Member
Mhamilton0911 said:
Hubs owns an autobody business. I have worked with him for 15+ years now. Over the years many have come through asking for full restos' on boats wanting the cheapest Macco work. Cheap doesn't last. Auto finishes can be used ABOVE the water line, but gel coat must be used below the water line. You can use automotive colors, base coats, flakes and such, but must be coated with a clear get coat to be waterproof long term. Anything inside or above water line can be a quality auto clearcoat.
Haha for sure. I'll be doing the work myself, so aside from a learning curve that might be kinda harsh, it shouldn't cost a ton to use high quality paints. I have been looking into the gel coat, and am not sure if i want to go with that or an epoxy. I have a 5 step epoxy I'm dealing with at work right now thats some pretty cool stuff, and I was going to do more research on whether or not it would also be suitable for a bottom paint top coat. It's not cheap @ around $100 a gallon tho, especially when I only need around half that.
 
  • Thread Starter

MrBryan723

Member
John58ford said:
That little flare at the bottom of the window might make it much harder to bend a piece of acrilic to make a fake. The corners/wrap around are pretty easy using a heat gun and some patience; I've only done simple bends before though, adding a second compound bend the long way across to screw down would require allot more heat than I know how to do. I would bet someone could make you one, still though. Could always start with the wet sanding as described by Fishproblem, then move into the novus stuff after you have taken a good but of the material off. I would just worry about the return on the time spent vs possible cost if it ends up needing to be replaced.

I think I saw either the deluxe version of that boat or maybe one a couple years newer at a lake recently. For some reason I imagined duracrafts having Cadillac style vertical tails.

Very cool project!
I knew i didn't have a quick fix on the windscreen. They do still have molds or can make a mold of it fortunately. If it's anywhere close to affordable I'll probably go that route. I have an orbital sander i could at least do the rough in with before i start by hand, so it won't be too terrible.
 
  • Thread Starter

MrBryan723

Member
Zach72202 said:
I haven't really gotten into any restoration yet, but I have gotten my feet wet I would suppose. I would like to get an old ford truck to restore as a summer vehicle, but being that I am a 20 year old college student, that isn't anytime soon for me!

I do on the other hand own a 1953 Harley-Davidson ST-165, or Hummer as they were known, little single cylinder two stroke bike! I bought it after the previous owner had redone all the chrome and powder coated the gas tank, frame, etc...The bike runs, but the bushings that hold the handlebars are a work in progress. Not to mention when I got it I had to redo all of the wiring (from original!) but it came with a brand new wiring kit and all the part books! Real slick bike, I plan to use it as like a 'trailer queen' for shows and cruising around town when I can. Biggest problem is most of my time and money is tied up in living away for college at the moment!

I also (as I live in Michigan) have an interest in the Antique and Vintage snowmobiles here in the state. I own a 1988 Sno-Scoot and a 1968 SnowBug, but I don't really have images of those. Neat little machines, getting really hard to find though.

This was the day I bought my Harley-Davidson - only suspension is the springs under the seat and small springs in the forks!
We all have to start some where lol. That's a nice bike. My first "project" was a 1986 honda aero 50cc scooter. Paid $40 for it with the title and had it running the same day.
 

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