Anyone adopted feeder fish as your fish pet?

Petchratn

Member
My 4 years old fall in love with rosy minnow as they are selling as live feeder in my local fish store Petsmart for 15 cents, I think they are not healthy...
Anyone have an experience adopt feeder???
 

kallililly1973

Member
Petchratn said:
My 4 years old fall in love with rosy minnow as they are selling as live feeder in my local fish store Petsmart for 15 cents, I think they are not healthy...
Anyone have an experience adopt feeder???
I was looking art those exact same fish yesterday at petsmart. It would be good if you did decide to get them to make them the first fish in the tank to be sure they don't infect other fish. and in a 20 long 20 of those swimming together would look pretty sweet I think.
 

kallililly1973

Member
Petchratn said:
My 4 years old fall in love with rosy minnow as they are selling as live feeder in my local fish store Petsmart for 15 cents, I think they are not healthy...
Anyone have an experience adopt feeder???
I was looking art those exact same fish yesterday at petsmart. It would be good if you did decide to get them to make them the first fish in the tank to be sure they don't infect other fish. and in a 20 long 20 of those swimming together would look pretty sweet I think.
 
  • Thread Starter

Petchratn

Member
kallililly1973 said:
I was looking art those exact same fish yesterday at petsmart. It would be good if you did decide to get them to make them the first fish in the tank to be sure they don't infect other fish. and in a 20 long 20 of those swimming together would look pretty sweet I think.
I never think to have one, till my 4 years old said mommy, these are cute. I admitted they look cute, and probably look great under black light (blue light).
 

david1978

Member
I have about 10 left in my 75 gallon tank. I started with 40 but I had a die off.
 
  • Thread Starter

Petchratn

Member
david1978 said:
I have about 10 left in my 75 gallon tank. I started with 40 but I had a die off.
It said 4 years lifespan, how long you have them...usually what I concerned, they already stressed and live in so packed/overcrowded, may not live long, lot of time I saw fews dead in tank and left that way.
 

FinalFins

Member
They can get pretty big (3-4 inch I think), they are fathead minnows and their spawning is interesting, they are like cichlids, the male guards the eggs.

I think a 30 gal would be suitible for a small school.
 
  • Thread Starter

Petchratn

Member
FinalFins said:
They can get pretty big (3-4 inch I think), they are fathead minnows and their spawning is interesting, they are like cichlids, the male guards the eggs.

I think a 30 gal would be suitible for a small school.
What!!!! 4”
 

CaptainAquatics

Member
I have a few feeder fish (AKA like three rosy reds and a couple fat heads). I started with a. Lot but now reduced to only a few.
 

FinalFins

Member
Petchratn said:
What!!!! 4”
I may be mistaken and they may only reach 3"...
 

Joshaeus

Member
Feeder guppies are viable aquarium fishes as well...feeder guppies are usually left to breed uncontrolled in outdoor ponds in the tropics, so they tend to revert to wild type coloration and patterning. They are often diseased when acquired, but if you can nurse them back to health they are not only attractive but are - due to the lack of selective breeding for attractive (but damaging) traits like long fins - also hardier than fancy guppies by a wide margin.
 

MissHope

Member
I am personally rather shy about getting feeder fish as a pet. The reason being most of the time feeder fish are kept in poor conditions before they even reach the store, are generally underfed due to the numbers they are kept in, and have communicable diseases that can infect tank mates or kill most of the initial group. Also, you may be spending anywhere from $2-5 extra per fish in trying to cure them of these diseases in medication, water treatments, etc., money that could be invested in buying an already healthy fish. Then there is the fact that breeders do not bother to "cull" or separate out fish that have congenital defects or diseases, so the fish may die shortly after even if they do recover (and you are more likely to receive a subpar specimen due to most stores having a policy against selecting feeder fish).

I feel like it would be hard for a kid to get a bunch of fish and have them die off shortly after, I know I was really heartbroken as a kid when my parents bought be feeder fish (by accident, not realizing the ten cents pricing was because they were food, not just small fish) and they all died within a couple weeks.

However, if you are an experienced fish keeper, are willing and able to spend the time and money to nurse them to full health and keep an eye on their behavior for any signs of stress or illness, a feeder fish can make a good pet just as any other fish.
 

david1978

Member
Petchratn said:
It said 4 years lifespan, how long you have them...usually what I concerned, they already stressed and live in so packed/overcrowded, may not live long, lot of time I saw fews dead in tank and left that way.
I have had them maybe 6 months. I had a big die off when I was in the hospital so I'm not really sure why. The ones that are left seem fine.
 
  • Thread Starter

Petchratn

Member
david1978 said:
I have had them maybe 6 months. I had a big die off when I was in the hospital so I'm not really sure why. The ones that are left seem fine.
Thank you for replying. I still think I may get some for my 4 years old. fish are just to fun to add in family members. I so in love with them.

MissHope said:
I am personally rather shy about getting feeder fish as a pet. The reason being most of the time feeder fish are kept in poor conditions before they even reach the store, are generally underfed due to the numbers they are kept in, and have communicable diseases that can infect tank mates or kill most of the initial group. Also, you may be spending anywhere from $2-5 extra per fish in trying to cure them of these diseases in medication, water treatments, etc., money that could be invested in buying an already healthy fish. Then there is the fact that breeders do not bother to "cull" or separate out fish that have congenital defects or diseases, so the fish may die shortly after even if they do recover (and you are more likely to receive a subpar specimen due to most stores having a policy against selecting feeder fish).

I feel like it would be hard for a kid to get a bunch of fish and have them die off shortly after, I know I was really heartbroken as a kid when my parents bought be feeder fish (by accident, not realizing the ten cents pricing was because they were food, not just small fish) and they all died within a couple weeks.

However, if you are an experienced fish keeper, are willing and able to spend the time and money to nurse them to full health and keep an eye on their behavior for any signs of stress or illness, a feeder fish can make a good pet just as any other fish.
Oh I forgot to think about that!!!! May be I have to search out from individual seller. Not in Petsmart or place that selling them as feeder.
 

MissHope

Member
Petchratn said:
Oh I forgot to think about that!!!! May be I have to search out from individual seller. Not in Petsmart or place that selling them as feeder.
If you cannot find a whole seller or breeder willing to sell to you directly, your best bet might be to ask your local fish stores when they receive their fish shipments. Usually fish stores get a new shipment of fish once a week, generally the same day (for example, my local fish store receives new stock on Thursday). Depending on your strategy and the quality of your store, you either a) want to get them right when they come in, or b) get fish right before they add new ones in.

Getting them right from the shipment might help prevent getting ones that are super starving or may catch a disease while in the tank, which is best when you have a fish store notorious for having sick and dying fish left in their tanks.

However, the waiting until right before a new shipment comes in is good if you have a fish store that is very good about maintaining their tanks and removing sick or dead fish. This delay allows the fish that come in ill time to recover or die off, which in turn allows the strongest and healthiest members of the group to be scooped up when you ask for them.

Generally I find the getting them "fresh" from a shipment better for a hearty species, since most fish stores can be terrible in treating and maintaining fish, and thus you can get and treat them while they still have some strength left.
 

Sorg67

Member
I am keeping feeder guppies. I like them, but I am just starting and just learning.
 
  • Thread Starter

Petchratn

Member
FinalFins said:
I may be mistaken and they may only reach 3"...
My female guppies look huge, I do believe guppy not growing bigger than 2” but to me I swear they are so big lol I don’t have any way to measure those swimming fish though. ) looking at 4 guppies in different sizing in my tanks, two of them are like whoa so big.
 

Sorg67

Member
My guys are small. I do not know how big they will get. I am in the process of separating males and females so I can slow down the fry train.

I am already going to end up with more than I can keep so some will have to go back to the feeder tank.
 
  • Thread Starter

Petchratn

Member
Sorg67 said:
My guys are small. I do not know how big they will get. I am in the process of separating males and females so I can slow down the fry train.

I am already going to end up with more than I can keep so some will have to go back to the feeder tank.
Great idea if you don’t want anymore fries, I think I still can handle lol. I am not planing to use live fish to feed my bettas or my husband plant to get Oscar, he always come by joking, “looking all those delicious meals for Oscar” I said no no no, they are my babies lol.
My bettas might be vegetarians, they denied to eat microworm, earthworm
 

Sorg67

Member
I considered getting a carnivore to help me with my expected excess guppy problem. I had some ideas how this would work. Having to modify some of my ideas but enjoying learning.
 

JettsPapa

Member
I buy feeder goldfish to put in cattle troughs to control algae and mosquito larvae. Does that count?
 
  • Thread Starter

Petchratn

Member
JettsPapa said:
I buy feeder goldfish to put in cattle troughs to control algae and mosquito larvae. Does that count?
I wish you live close by me lol, I will beg you some mosquito larvae. )
Seriously my dad used to let guppies live outdoor in Thailand, they fed by mosquitoes larvae and they are colorful, vibrant more than here.
 

qquake2k

Member
I've had 20 rosy red minnows in my 46 for a month and a half. Haven't lost any that I know of, even though I've had some high ammonia problems. Don't know what's causing the high ammonia. I wouldn't think 20 minnows would be too many in a 46, but don't know for sure. I like them, they're very active all the time.
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
Only when I was young, I got a bunch of feeder goldfish in very cramped tank, I had them for 2 years before maintenance got too much for my mum and we gave them to a friend . Not cycled or anything the only reason it worked out for 2 years was the maintenance my mum did, weekly 100% changes and a scrub down.
3 weeks after we gave them away they all died, without the ridiculous maintenance the tank stood no chance.
 
  • Thread Starter

Petchratn

Member
jinjerJOSH22 said:
Only when I was young, I got a bunch of feeder goldfish in very cramped tank, I had them for 2 years before maintenance got too much for my mum and we gave them to a friend . Not cycled or anything the only reason it worked out for 2 years was the maintenance my mum did, weekly 100% changes and a scrub down.
3 weeks after we gave them away they all died, without the ridiculous maintenance the tank stood no chance.
100% water change weekly!!!!
 
  • Thread Starter

Petchratn

Member
qquake2k said:
I've had 20 rosy red minnows in my 46 for a month and a half. Haven't lost any that I know of, even though I've had some high ammonia problems. Don't know what's causing the high ammonia. I wouldn't think 20 minnows would be too many in a 46, but don't know for sure. I like them, they're very active all the time.
Wow those are such cute houses. Very beautiful set up! And the fish look beautiful.
 

jinjerJOSH22

Member
Petchratn said:
For 2 years, she would carry the tank to the kitchen sink and scrub it down.
It's much easier to do it the proper way
 

potter

Member
I've had my rosy reds for 4-5 years. I originally bought them for my waterlily tub outside to eliminate mosquito larvae but their cuteness grew on me over time.

I started with 9 but a few died over the years probably from being old. None were sick or died from the original batch when I first bought them. I still have 5 from my original batch that are 4-5 years old and are still going strong and my biggest is about 3"-4". The rest is a bit smaller.

I have 16 now. I've added more because they are happier with a few more friends. It also didn't help that when I went to the store to get a few more, they had only 11 left in the tank and I just couldn't pick so they all came home with me .

They are in a 40 gallon stock tank with a 110 Aquaclear filter so there's enough room. 6 of them go outside in my 20 gallon waterlily tub every summer and they really colour up from the sun.

I seldom lose a new minnow when I buy them. I bring a thermal bag with zipper and I put them right in there when I get them and go straight home. I then feed them right away in the bag when I get home with garlic juice soaked fish food. I acclimatize them and wala they go into my main tank. They came from the same store so I did not quarantine my new ones.

Of course like any other fish, make sure your tank is cycled. I do appropriate water changes every week. I do give them caves and plastic plants. They get fed appropriately. They have never bred for me or they did and ate the eggs.. I'm not sure but I'd take that over having too many babies and not sure what to do with them. The last thing I want to do is to have to sell the babies because I do not have room and having others use them as baits or feeders.

I'd say go for it. Out of all the fishes I've used to have, rosy reds gave me the least headache. They don't fight, they don't bully each other, they don't breed non stop, they play with each other a lot once they're comfortable with their surrounding. Mine eat out of my hands. I love my rosy reds .
 

Most photos, videos and links are disabled if you are not logged in.

Log in or register to view



Top Bottom