Any Tips For Keeping A Wild Betta?

Discussion in 'Betta Fish' started by GlamCrab, Apr 25, 2017.

  1. GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    at the start of april i got myself a wild betta (it was in a cup and i felt bad for it). But i know NOTHING about them. For now whatever im doing seems to be working..

    IMG_0006.JPG

    It eats micro pellets, flakes, bloodworms..

    i imagined it would be harder...
     
  2. Platylover

    Platylover Fishlore VIP Member

    Do you know what type of wild betta it is? If you don't that might be a good place to start with an ID. It seems to have a longer body than the ones I've seen in the betta splendans family, this link has the names of all the betta species  
    I clearer photo could help too.:)
     
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2017
  3. OP
    OP
    GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    I had some poeple help with ID and.. its 100% NOT a betta splendens
    Its 50/50 on being a betta coccina or a betta livida... im leaning towards coccina
    Also someone pointed out a possible eggspot on another picture. So its also possibly a female
     




  4. Platylover

    Platylover Fishlore VIP Member

    I have no experience with wild types, so hopefully people that do have some will come on. Have you checked out the care sheets on seriously fish? They tend to be very informative and helpful. Here's the one on coccina-
    etta coccina – Scarlet Betta
     
  5. OP
    OP
    GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    I dont either, thats why im asking..
    i thought it was a baby betta splendens until i took a good look at it in my aquarium. It has really pretty blue eyes~
     
  6. Neptune334

    Neptune334 Valued Member Member

    I would research the Betta's natural water details and recreate them in your tank. I would also set up a very natural habitat with lots of hiding areas and cover. Indian Almond Leaves and any other tannin-releasing leaves should be added to provide a healthy, wild environment.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    I never used real driftwood before.. does any kind do? (From those found in petstores)
     
  8. Nanologist

    Nanologist Well Known Member Member

    Generally, any driftwood found at the LFS is safe, imo. Our LFS has a wide variety and most looks like it's been used in their tanks. Some of the large pieces already had tiles or rocks attached so that they can be buried and anchor it down even. I grabbed a smaller, newer piece and let it soak in multiple hot water baths to release majority of the tannins first, but you don't have to if you want to go for the black water natural look.

    Many people have even picked up driftwood from a local river or lake but you will have to take precautions to the type of wood (some are poisonous and some are full of sap or parasites). Would have to use your best judgement, boil it, or ask on here about possibly identifying it first though.

    The piece I got was fairly small and they charged by weight (per pound) but it came out to only $1.50. I have no idea what type of wood it is, but here's pic of it in my tank: 2d7a505d12a63427e3cfff40cbdc7fb0.jpg
     
  9. Nanologist

    Nanologist Well Known Member Member

    Generally, any driftwood found at the LFS is safe, imo. Our LFS has a wide variety and most looks like it's been used in their tanks. Some of the large pieces already had tiles or rocks attached so that they can be buried and anchor it down even. I grabbed a smaller, newer piece and let it soak in multiple hot water baths to release majority of the tannins first, but you don't have to if you want to go for the black water natural look.

    Many people have even picked up driftwood from a local river or lake but you will have to take precautions to the type of wood (some are poisonous and some are full of sap or parasites). Would have to use your best judgement, boil it, or ask on here about possibly identifying it first though.

    The piece I got was fairly small and they charged by weight (per pound) but it came out to only $1.50. I have no idea what type of wood it is, but here's pic of it in my tank: 2d7a505d12a63427e3cfff40cbdc7fb0.jpg
     
  10. OP
    OP
    GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    I think i'll stick with what i can find in stores for now. Even if it takes me awhile to find a piece i like.. (the hardest part for me lol)

    Your little driftwood looks pretty in there.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    Also when i got it, it seemed to already know that pellets = food. Because i saw it eat a micro pellet the second day it was home.

    Im thinking it might not be wild caught?

    Or it learned to eat pellets at the store.
     
  12. Nanologist

    Nanologist Well Known Member Member

    From my experience, if a fish is healthy and hungry, pretty much anything that resembles food hitting the surface of the water is fair game... Sometimes they can definitely be picky though and prefer whatever type of food they were raised on.

    When I got Phil last month, I could tell he was fed a diet of flakes, since there was uneaten flakes in the bottom of his cup... :yuck:
    He didn't go for the pellets right away, but eventually when he got hungry enough he attacked them with fury! Now he jumps at them and eats from my finger. I'll have to record a video of it some day.
     
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2017
  13. OP
    OP
    GlamCrab

    GlamCrab Well Known Member Member

    True, this guy had uneaten pellets in his bowl lol (but my pellets were much smaller.)
    She waited for them to sink before eating any.
    My larger fish eat at the surface the smaller ones wait for it to sink. (Its in my 23 gallon until the 5 gallon is ready)

    She is picky he wont eat flakes. She spits them right out. But when i put in the cory's food she doesnt spit out the crumbs she catches.
    (I break the pellets apart because ALL my fish are fans of the cory's food and would eat all of it before them)
     




  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice