Anubias or Java Fern?

Anubias or Java Fern?

  • Anubias

  • Java Fern


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alven
Member
Hello everyone!

I have a 10g and I wanna get some live plants in there. The two plants I'm contemplating however would be anubias or java fern. I can't get both and only have to pick one, but I just can't decide. Any advice? Anubias is good because my betta can rest on it if he/she wants to but then again, java fern grows tall in a 10G and my betta can hide in or behind it. I'm really torn on what to choose-

Also, I have a rock that I can attach the anubias to, but I also have a log that I can attach the java fern to. :/
 
LHAquatics
Member
Can I get a picture of the tank? Height is really important so I would get Java Fern. There are some big anubias tho.
 
  • Thread Starter
alven
Member
Cory04 said:
Can I get a picture of the tank? Height is really important so I would get Java Fern. There are some big anubias tho.

20210504_112157.jpg

Not much but I plan on adding more plants.
20210504_113403.jpg
 
barbiespoodle
Member
Personally I have far more luck with anubia's for the simple reason that they reproduce from runners thus increasing the size of the plant without the plant moving. Java ferns reproduce from plantlettes and often that mean the leaf they are on die to release the plantlettes so can change your aquascaping as the new plantlettes look for a spot to grow. I'm forever finding this or that java fern in a new spot in the various tanks.

And cory is right, you do have to make sure to research which anubia's you are getting because they come in a wide range of sizes, a lesson I learned the hard way when I first started with live plants. But there always seem to be one to fit any tank and I have them in most of my tanks and love them.
 
  • Thread Starter
alven
Member
barbiespoodle said:
Personally I have far more luck with anubia's for the simple reason that they reproduce from runners thus increasing the size of the plant without the plant moving. Java ferns reproduce from plantlettes and often that mean the leaf they are on die to release the plantlettes so can change your aquascaping as the new plantlettes look for a spot to grow. I'm forever finding this or that java fern in a new spot in the various tanks.

And cory is right, you do have to make sure to research which anubia's you are getting because they come in a wide range of sizes, a lesson I learned the hard way when I first started with live plants. But there always seem to be one to fit any tank and I have them in most of my tanks and love them.
Is Anubias nana fine? I heard that Bettas love this plant.
 
betta06
Member
aIvinn said:
Is Anubias nana fine? I heard that Bettas love this plant.
that is what I have and I really like it! I would definitely go with anubias too, it is a lot hardier and will do better in a wider range of waters compared to java fern who will do incredible for some people but die right away for others.
 
JLAquatics
Member
aIvinn said:
Hello everyone!

I have a 10g and I wanna get some live plants in there. The two plants I'm contemplating however would be anubias or java fern. I can't get both and only have to pick one, but I just can't decide. Any advice? Anubias is good because my betta can rest on it if he/she wants to but then again, java fern grows tall in a 10G and my betta can hide in or behind it. I'm really torn on what to choose-

Also, I have a rock that I can attach the anubias to, but I also have a log that I can attach the java fern to. :/
For you, I would stick with a few different varieties of Anubias in your tank to start. An Anubias Frazeri in the back would look nice, as would Anubias Barteri. Anubias Nana (or nana petite) could be used for foreground accents and fill your tank with green. Another good beginner plant you should try is Bucephalandra. There are dozens of different buce and most if not all make great beginner plants for you. They grow the same way as Anubias, tie them to wood or rock and your pretty much set. I recommend buying a larger peice of driftwood when you get Anubias or Bucephalandra. Both plants will like the porous surface and will be able to anchor themselves much easier than the resin log you already have. (You could even try some aquarium moss too if you get some driftwood)! If you want, you could also try some floaters in this tank such as Frogbit. These are easy to care for as well and will add an additional point of interest in your tank with their long dangling roots.
 
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alven
Member
Thank you so much for the advice everyone! However, I'm a teenager (i live off my moms wallet lol) so I don't think she would want me getting a lot of plants. (she's not a fish person lol..) so I think I'm just going to do Anubias Barteri on my rock as JL said. Thank you though! :D
 
JLAquatics
Member
aIvinn said:
Thank you so much for the advice everyone! However, I'm a teenager (i live off my moms wallet lol) so I don't think she would want me getting a lot of plants. (she's not a fish person lol..) so I think I'm just going to do Anubias Barteri on my rock as JL said. Thank you though! :D
For sure! Anubias Barteri is a great plant to start with! It is super easy and will look nice for a long time. They are not too expensive and your Betta will definitely appreciate it! Just make sure you don't bury the rhizome in substrate, which is why many of us recommend tying the plant onto driftwood and rocks. You should show us some pictures once you get the new plant.
 
  • Thread Starter
alven
Member
JLAquatics said:
For sure! Anubias Barteri is a great plant to start with! It is super easy and will look nice for a long time. They are not too expensive and your Betta will definitely appreciate it! Just make sure you don't bury the rhizome in substrate, which is why many of us recommend tying the plant onto driftwood and rocks. You should show us some pictures once you get the new plant.
I definitely will! Thanks. I'm planning on using super glue to stick it to the rock?
 
JLAquatics
Member
aIvinn said:
I definitely will! Thanks. I'm planning on using super glue to stick it to the rock?
Yup, just don't go overdo it with the glue (you can suffocate the rhizome and kill the plant this way). Just a little glue enough to stick it down should suffice. You can also use fishing line to keep the plant in place as well.
 
  • Thread Starter
alven
Member
JLAquatics said:
Yup, just don't go overdo it with the glue (you can suffocate the rhizome and kill the plant this way). Just a little glue enough to stick it down should suffice. You can also use fishing line to keep the plant in place as well.
Hmm. With the glue which part of the plant would I want to glue?
 
JLAquatics
Member
aIvinn said:
Hmm. With the glue which part of the plant would I want to glue?
Just using small dabs of glue on a few small section of the Rhizome will be fine. Don't cover the entire Rhizome in glue or constrict the roots. Remember, the plant will naturally attach itself to the object you glue it on over time.
 
  • Thread Starter
alven
Member
JLAquatics said:
Just using small dabs of glue on a few small section of the Rhizome will be fine. Don't cover the entire Rhizome in glue or constrict the roots. Remember, the plant will naturally attach itself to the object you glue it on over time.
Alright just to be sure, you said dabs of glue on the rhizome then I can attach it directly to the rock?
 
emeraldking
Member
I love both kinds of plants. To me it would be a hard choice to make which one I'd prefer more.
 
JLAquatics
Member
aIvinn said:
Alright just to be sure, you said dabs of glue on the rhizome then I can attach it directly to the rock?
Actually, it may be better to glue some of the roots instead of the Rhizome, as roots can regrow on the plant. Take out the object you plan on gluing the Anubias to. Dry the object some, and put some glue (not too much) on the object where you want to place the plant. Then, hold the plant down for roughly 30 seconds to make sure that it will stay in place with a firm bond and you can then put it back in the water. The glue will become a whitish color in the water as well, so make sure you use it sparingly.
 
  • Thread Starter
alven
Member
JLAquatics said:
Actually, it may be better to glue some of the roots instead of the Rhizome, as roots can regrow on the plant. Take out the object you plan on gluing the Anubias to. Dry the object some, and put some glue (not too much) on the object where you want to place the plant. Then, hold the plant down for roughly 30 seconds to make sure that it will stay in place with a firm bond and you can then put it back in the water. The glue will become a whitish color in the water as well, so make sure you use it sparingly.
Alright, got it. Thank you again.
 
JLAquatics
Member
aIvinn said:
Alright, got it. Thank you again.
No problem, glad I could help out a little. :)
 
  • Thread Starter
alven
Member
JLAquatics Also, how do you differentiate anubias nana and anubias barteri?
 
JLAquatics
Member
aIvinn said:
JLAquatics Also, how do you differentiate anubias nana and anubias barteri?
Both plants will do great in your setup, but Anubias Barteri generally gets longer stems and larger leaves than Anubias Nana, which has more compact and smaller growth. Nana Petite is even smaller and more compact than regular Nana. All plants look very similar, but size is the main difference here.
 
barbiespoodle
Member
I've both tied and glued anubia's. I've tied them when I wanted to add one to a piece of driftwood that was too large to remove from the tank without making it a big production to do so, just tied it to the driftwood while it was still in the tank. I've even just tucked them into a hollow or crack in a piece of driftwood and had them do just fine.

I find gluing far easier. When I add a new plant, I walk my gardens for an interesting rock, I have lots of various rocks since I tend to pick them up on my hikes. And it doesn't have to be a big rock, it's basically there to hold the plant down.

I soak the rock overnight to loosen dirt, scrub it well and then try the plant in different positions until I find where I want to glue it. Then I dab the part of the rock I want to glue and the part of the plant that will be glued with a paper towel to dry it a bit, dab on the glue, hold in place about 30 seconds and then let the rock sit for another minute or two before I put it in the tank.

I've done this quite a few times recently when I decided to convert the 55 gallon from plastic to all live and natural and anubia's are one of the few plants that the silver dollars don't consider a midnight snack.

And maybe when you go to pick out your plant, you might be able to talk your Mom into a marimo ball at the same time. They are cute, she might like that. Plus they are basically a no care plant, just put them in and move them a little from time to time to keep them round. Even then I find either the fish or water change does that for me, I just move them when I want them in a new spot.
 
  • Thread Starter
alven
Member
barbiespoodle said:
I've both tied and glued anubia's. I've tied them when I wanted to add one to a piece of driftwood that was too large to remove from the tank without making it a big production to do so, just tied it to the driftwood while it was still in the tank. I've even just tucked them into a hollow or crack in a piece of driftwood and had them do just fine.

I find gluing far easier. When I add a new plant, I walk my gardens for an interesting rock, I have lots of various rocks since I tend to pick them up on my hikes. And it doesn't have to be a big rock, it's basically there to hold the plant down.

I soak the rock overnight to loosen dirt, scrub it well and then try the plant in different positions until I find where I want to glue it. Then I dab the part of the rock I want to glue and the part of the plant that will be glued with a paper towel to dry it a bit, dab on the glue, hold in place about 30 seconds and then let the rock sit for another minute or two before I put it in the tank.

I've done this quite a few times recently when I decided to convert the 55 gallon from plastic to all live and natural and anubia's are one of the few plants that the silver dollars don't consider a midnight snack.

And maybe when you go to pick out your plant, you might be able to talk your Mom into a marimo ball at the same time. They are cute, she might like that. Plus they are basically a no care plant, just put them in and move them a little from time to time to keep them round. Even then I find either the fish or water change does that for me, I just move them when I want them in a new spot.
Thank you! I got a rock from my backyard recently and did the same thing you did. The rocks actually make the tank look more natural. I'll definitely glue the plant to my rock. Also, you use super glue right?
 
barbiespoodle
Member
Yeap, super glue. I go to the dollar store and get loctite. It's aquarium safe, even in my shrimp tanks and holds well. Plus can't beat dollar store prices, lol.
 
  • Thread Starter
alven
Member
barbiespoodle said:
Yeap, super glue. I go to the dollar store and get loctite. It's aquarium safe, even in my shrimp tanks and holds well. Plus can't beat dollar store prices, lol.
Hmm. I want to use gorilla glue?
 
Broggy
Member
I like anubias barteri or any large leaf type. my Corydoras love to sleep on the leaves.
 
barbiespoodle
Member
Broggy said:
I like anubias barteri or any large leaf type. my Corydoras love to sleep on the leaves.
I've never notice my cory's sitting on a leaf. I've seen them cleaning a leaf or laying eggs on a leaf, but not resting on one, maybe they do it when I'm not watching. But my sae's do it constantly, it's kind of one of the things I love about them, a beautiful streamline fish taking a nap on a leaf and the anubia are their favs to do so.

When I do finally get to the point that I'm able to get the betta I have wanted forever (long story about my betta tank, or rather, lack of betta tank), he/she will have anubia's in the tank to rest on.

aIvinn said:
Hmm. I want to use gorilla glue?
Can't give an answer on that one since I've never used it. I can't remember the ingredients you have to look for to make it aquarium safe off hand, but if you go to youtube, you will be able to find the info there. I know some super glues are safe, some are not. I just remembered seeing one youtuber using loctite and when I saw it at the dollar store I bought several of them since there is always a need for super glue even if it's not fish related, lol.
 

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