Anubias Dying

Goldie&Yami

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Hello all! My name is Miranda, I'm new to most of this. I have been fish keeping since January. Up to this moment in time all my current fish are happy and thriving and both my running tanks (5 and 20 gallon) are doing splendidly. I want to work myself up to owning a planted tank. I started out small and what i thought was easy and got an anubias I even got it attached to driftwood already so I knew it would have a healthy root system already. Now it seems to be dying I'm not exactly sure why!! I would like to get as much feedback as possible as to what I'm doing wrong so I can correct it and start growing happy healthy greenery for my water friends. I think after all rhe trouble we went through from the start they deserve it!
I have attached pictures from many angles.
*Before discussion begins I am already in the process of getting a better light. When I bought my plant I didn't realize the vagueness of "low light".
**The light I have currently is only giving off about half the wattage for a 20 gallon planted tank.
 

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Goldie&Yami

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Really?! Its got all the spotting on the leaves or yellowing on the bigger leaves and its lost about 4 leaves in the past couple weeks. Right on the end where it looks stringy. The stems on the fallen leaves looked dead stringy and they were soft and mushy. It just seemed unhealthy for it to be doing that. So that's normal?
 

bitseriously

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How long ago did you add the Anubias to your tank?

Also, although plants like crypts, java ferns and anubias seem hardy and tough, your best bet to get started with planted tanks is fast growers and floaters.
Hornwort, Elodea (anacharis), water sprite, those types. The plants seem flimsier, but they take a wider range of conditions and do a better job of pulling nitrates etc out of the water. Duckweed if you're brave, or salvinia for floaters, and mosses, like java or weeping.
 
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Goldie&Yami

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The anubias is about 3 weeks old to this tank. I ordered online and it was very healthy aside from I think some white spidery algae that came with it.

I would like some floater but I want just about anything but duckweed or water lettuce. I need something that is sturdy can withstand the current of my tank but won't completely overrun it. I can handle some light maintenance during weekly water changes but i dont want something that I'll have clear out or mess with everyday.

Also it should prolly be mentioned my 20 gallon is primarily a bottomfeeder/invert tank no mid or high level swimmers.
 

bitseriously

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It's not uncommon for plants to lose leaves when added to an aquarium. You're still in the time frame where you could be seeing that. And it's more likely than any disease or deficiency at this point. As long as you have a few fish to provide nitrogen, you shouldn't be seeing leaf loss due to a deficiency at this point. Another big cause of leaf loss in new tank (called 'melting') is if the plant was grown emersed (leaves out of water, which is common because they grow faster, so can be sold sooner), and is now submerged. The leaves basically have the wrong physiology, so the plant gets rid of them in favor of new ones. So give it time, and watch for new growth.
For floaters, we're not always talking about plants on the surface - the term is sometimes also used for plants that are poorly rooted in the substrate. Hornwort and elodea are good examples. You can stick them in the substrate, but they might not grow roots, and it's not uncommon for them to be dislodged and simply float about. In a crowded tank, they get caught in something and hold still there.
I love water lettuce, what have you heard that you don't like?
 

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When I started fishkeeping many moons ago, the common practice was to wrap strips of lead around clumps of rooted plants like Elodea and Anacharis so they would stay where they were placed and develop root systems. It did work almost all the time. I guess that isn't done today for some reason. We never used superglue to stick plants to rocks or wood. Why? because superglue didn't exist yet.
 
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Goldie&Yami

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bitseriously said:
It's not uncommon for plants to lose leaves when added to an aquarium. You're still in the time frame where you could be seeing that. And it's more likely than any disease or deficiency at this point. As long as you have a few fish to provide nitrogen, you shouldn't be seeing leaf loss due to a deficiency at this point. Another big cause of leaf loss in new tank (called 'melting') is if the plant was grown emersed (leaves out of water, which is common because they grow faster, so can be sold sooner), and is now submerged. The leaves basically have the wrong physiology, so the plant gets rid of them in favor of new ones. So give it time, and watch for new growth.
For floaters, we're not always talking about plants on the surface - the term is sometimes also used for plants that are poorly rooted in the substrate. Hornwort and elodea are good examples. You can stick them in the substrate, but they might not grow roots, and it's not uncommon for them to be dislodged and simply float about. In a crowded tank, they get caught in something and hold still there.
I love water lettuce, what have you heard that you don't like?
A lot of things i read about water lettuce or quite a bit of plants is that if the leaves get too wet on the top they will rot and dye off. I have a pretty strong current in my 20. Since I all my fish are bottom level anyways they aren't as affected as say a mid or too level would. I have 2 different filters going in my 20 for multiple reasons. But because of that the surface is being quite disturbed 24/7.

I'm also just simplistic person in general. I find beauty in the simplest of things. I really like just a nice bright colored leafy plant. Like water spangles or baby tears for perfect example

Ok so that makes complete sense about the whole new tank melting thing. The new leaves look great bright green and pretty just small. Its the big old leaves that the plant came with that is browning yellowing and wilting off. I hope that's all this is. I canceled a plant order because I thought I was doing something wrong and I didn't want to buy anymore plants to just die in my tank. Lol.
 

dwarfpufferlover

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If what you are experiencing is mush and rot then its Anubias melt and I had to make a thread here on the same issue. I just lost another last week since switching to RO water.

It is not you, just the plant trying to get used to different conditions then used to before.
 
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Goldie&Yami

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dwarfpufferlover said:
If what you are experiencing is mush and rot then its Anubias melt and I had to make a thread here on the same issue. I just lost another last week since switching to RO water.

It is not you, just the plant trying to get used to different conditions then used to before.
Do I dont need to buy a kit to test micro or macro levels? I was hoping to get plants that didn't require all that. The water from my tap is very hard water.
Would you think my plant is getting enough light? Do I need to get a new light?
And I dont need any ferts do I?
I am wanting to stay away from those altogether if possible since my tank is mostly inverts. I am using Seachem Flourite substrate.
 

dwarfpufferlover

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Goldie&Yami said:
Do I dont need to buy a kit to test micro or macro levels? I was hoping to get plants that didn't require all that. The water from my tap is very hard water.
Would you think my plant is getting enough light? Do I need to get a new light?
And I dont need any ferts do I?
I am wanting to stay away from those altogether if possible since my tank is mostly inverts. I am using Seachem Flourite substrate.

You don't need any of those, anubias prefers hard water anyways it just needs time to recover and generally you can get away without having a light if the room provides some. Regular flourish won't harm a fly and helps if you ever want something extra for your plants especially since it pulls nutrients from water column.

I was just patient and I finally have new growth after picking rot away for months I was surprised it made it.

Hope something helped and wish luck.
 
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Goldie&Yami

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It was all very helpful thank you! I think I will redo my order than(with some moderations to it) I wanted some baby tears, water spangles(or something floating), ludwigia or pennywort/moneywort, and some kind of sword. Maybe not all right away. But do any of those need any special requirements I'm not already providing?
My light only has a 9.6 wattage a little over 2000k.
 

dwarfpufferlover

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Goldie&Yami said:
It was all very helpful thank you! I think I will redo my order than(with some moderations to it) I wanted some baby tears, water spangles(or something floating), ludwigia or pennywort/moneywort, and some kind of sword. Maybe not all right away. But do any of those need any special requirements I'm not already providing?
My light only has a 9.6 wattage a little over 2000k.
You may consider a different source. I've had the best luck with tubes from petco and petsmart for anubias.

All of the rest of those plants are beyond me However some do require special care.
 
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Goldie&Yami

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dwarfpufferlover said:
You may consider a different source. I've had the best luck with tubes from petco and petsmart for anubias.

All of the rest of those plants are beyond me However some do require special care.
Thank you!!
 

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The spotting is green spot algae, which is pretty common on slow growing plants in low tech tanks. Not much you can do about it, but if it really bothers you, brushing some glutaraldehyde like seachem excel on it will kill the algae.
 

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Goldie&Yami said:
It was all very helpful thank you! I think I will redo my order than(with some moderations to it) I wanted some baby tears, water spangles(or something floating), ludwigia or pennywort/moneywort, and some kind of sword. Maybe not all right away. But do any of those need any special requirements I'm not already providing?
My light only has a 9.6 wattage a little over 2000k.
So, I'm also pretty new to this and started a planted recently. From what I researched it would be hard to keep baby tears without CO2, it could work but you will see very little growth and maybe even some yellowing. Apart from this they need a strong light and also root tabs or substrate.

I was searching up pretty low tech plants and came across this video:
this guy's tanks is amazing and was perfect to get a sense of what plants do well in no co2 low tech tanks. Check the description for the plants he uses and I think in the 6 month update vid he writes in the description which plants are doing really well.

Regardless good luck on your tank! and I suggest getting driftwood and moss since it really brings a tank together
 

bitseriously

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If u have strong surface movement/agitation, any surface plant (water spangles aka salvinia, my preference dw water lettuce, whatever), you’ll need to work out some sort of corral. A closed loop of airline tubing, secured to the side somehow, works well for this.
Many folks (myself included) find it necessary to fertilize. How much is a highly variable thing, depends on lots of factors, won’t go into deets here. But for plants that grow strong root systems in the substrate (swords, val’s, crypts and the like) root tabs are a common choice, and for everything else a liquid supplement. Mostly you’d be dosing micronutrients, since macros come from fish poop (I’m massively simplifying).
 

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Most of my anubias came from Petco too. When I first started out, anubias and amazon sword were my first to grow. They did great...even with goldfish. I do have to say that since I started using Flourish and Excel, my anubias has really grown. Just killed another bunch of anacharis with it though. Oh, be sure to buy the plants in the tubes, as Goldie&Yamin said. They have others but you won’t get unwanted snails in the tube ones.
 
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Goldie&Yami

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Duardo said:
So, I'm also pretty new to this and started a planted recently. From what I researched it would be hard to keep baby tears without CO2, it could work but you will see very little growth and maybe even some yellowing. Apart from this they need a strong light and also root tabs or substrate.

I was searching up pretty low tech plants and came across this video:
this guy's tanks is amazing and was perfect to get a sense of what plants do well in no co2 low tech tanks. Check the description for the plants he uses and I think in the 6 month update vid he writes in the description which plants are doing really well.

Regardless good luck on your tank! and I suggest getting driftwood and moss since it really brings a tank together
I LOVE this. I have watched all this guys videos. They are great, informative, and EXTREMELY helpful!! Thank you!

bitseriously said:
If u have strong surface movement/agitation, any surface plant (water spangles aka salvinia, my preference dw water lettuce, whatever), you’ll need to work out some sort of corral. A closed loop of airline tubing, secured to the side somehow, works well for this.
Many folks (myself included) find it necessary to fertilize. How much is a highly variable thing, depends on lots of factors, won’t go into deets here. But for plants that grow strong root systems in the substrate (swords, val’s, crypts and the like) root tabs are a common choice, and for everything else a liquid supplement. Mostly you’d be dosing micronutrients, since macros come from fish poop (I’m massively simplifying).
Thank you for your time! I know a little bit enough to get me started I just want to make sure there isn't anything I need to equip myself with before I buy anymore plants which is why the questions.

Goldie&Yami said:
Thank you for your time! I know a little bit enough to get me started I just want to make sure there isn't anything I need to equip myself with before I buy anymore plants which is why the questions.
I will look into some DIY ideas for the floating coral. For now I'm trying to find out if I need to purchase better lighting.
 
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