Another Pond Queries Thread

Dandelion-Dream

I've had some more questions, and my last thread didn't get many answers, so I'll put those and some new ones here.

1. Is a 300 gallon pond suitable for 2 Comet Goldfish?
2. If I use a galvanized steel water trough with some EPDM liner, are there any concerns of it collapsing or springing a leak?
3. How do I keep evil herons away?
4. Info on waterfall weirs?
5. Info on pond de-icers?
6. Any aquatic plants that can last the winter?
7. Any common mistakes pond beginners make?
8. Last but not least, can you give me the basics of keeping a pond?
 

maggie thecat

Yes, you can keep a pair of comets in a 300 gallon pond. The stocking suggest for goldfish vary, but 50 gallons per fish, with a baseline of 100 gallons is about average.

Yes, you can line a stock tank with pond liner.

As long as the tank is in good repair and you are reasonably careful with how you install the liner and what goes in the pond (no sharp objects) it should be many years before the liner degrades and you need to make repairs.

Heron can be dissuaded from visiting your pond by putting a fake heron nearby. They are semI territorial, and if they see someone has already moved in they will keep looking.

You tube is your friend on how to rig these, although with a stock tank as the basis of your pond, a water fall is a bit hard to visualize. If you are looking for aeration, consider a spitter,, a in pond filter that has a fountain as part of tje system, or both.

Hardy water lilys are fine to zone 4 or 5. Other plants like hornwort or parrot feather may survive if submerged, depending on your climate.

Common mistakes. Over stocking. Stocking with the wrong fish. Not planning for overwintering if their climate is harsh. Doing too much too fast. Not doing their homework.

Deicers are a good idea if you live in a freeze zone. The are available at farm and pond supplies. A cheap alternative, depending on how cold your winter is, is a rubber ball to keep a hole formed in the ice.

The internet is full of advice. There are also books at your library. You need to do some research on your own then come back with additional questions.
 

BottomDweller

1. Yes depending on dimensions

2. Probably not

3. I use this metal mesh stuff or you can use netting

4. I don't know sorry

5. I don't know sorry

6. Liles are usually pretty good. Elodea crispaa (often sold as "oxygenating pond plant")

7. Bad/little/no filtration. My first ever pond did not have a filter, which was one of the worst mistakes I have made in fishkeeping. Now all my ponds are well filtered with bottom drains.

Not checking up on their fish. I catch all my pond fish every month or every other month (but not in winter) and check them over. Any that have any issues are put in a tank in the garage (so the temperature is similar to that of the pond) and treated before being put back outside.

8. Once a month or so I empty out about half the pond and scrub off algae on the sides then replace the water with clean water. I also clean the filter with dechlorinated water.
About twice a year I empty out the pond completely, clean everything and replace the water.

In winter leave the fish be. Goldfish go into a hibernation state where they eat very little and sit or swim very slowly at the bottom of the pond.
In summer feed them often. Make sure the filtration is good and there is plenty of oxygen. If necessary add a/another airstone. Give them some shade, floating plants (like duckweed) or plants with big floating leaves (like lilies) are great for this.
In spring fish may be breeding. If they are feed them plenty. Breeding is tough on the fish, especially the female and they will need lots of energy and food to recover.

When the water temperature is below 8c do not feed them at all. When it is 8-14c they get fed 2-3 times a week with easily digestible foods. When the water is 15-18c they get fed once a day. When the water is 19c+ they get fed twice a day.
 

Dandelion-Dream

1. Yes depending on dimensions

2. Probably not

3. I use this metal mesh stuff or you can use netting

4. I don't know sorry

5. I don't know sorry

6. Liles are usually pretty good. Elodea crispaa (often sold as "oxygenating pond plant")

7. Bad/little/no filtration. My first ever pond did not have a filter, which was one of the worst mistakes I have made in fishkeeping. Now all my ponds are well filtered with bottom drains.

Not checking up on their fish. I catch all my pond fish every month or every other month (but not in winter) and check them over. Any that have any issues are put in a tank in the garage (so the temperature is similar to that of the pond) and treated before being put back outside.

8. Once a month or so I empty out about half the pond and scrub off algae on the sides then replace the water with clean water. I also clean the filter with dechlorinated water.
About twice a year I empty out the pond completely, clean everything and replace the water.

In winter leave the fish be. Goldfish go into a hibernation state where they eat very little and sit or swim very slowly at the bottom of the pond.
In summer feed them often. Make sure the filtration is good and there is plenty of oxygen. If necessary add a/another airstone. Give them some shade, floating plants (like duckweed) or plants with big floating leaves (like lilies) are great for this.
In spring fish may be breeding. If they are feed them plenty. Breeding is tough on the fish, especially the female and they will need lots of energy and food to recover.

When the water temperature is below 8c do not feed them at all. When it is 8-14c they get fed 2-3 times a week with easily digestible foods. When the water is 15-18c they get fed once a day. When the water is 19c+ they get fed twice a day.
Some more:
Is water lettuce okay in zone 6?
Do you cycle a pond, or does it only work with tanks?
Instead of having a bottom drain, can I just reach in and siphon out some of the waste weekly?
Is TetraPond reliable?
 

BottomDweller

1. I have no experience with water lettuce so will leave that to someone else

2. I cycle ponds. Fortunately for me the water I use to fill up the ponds has 1-1.5ppm ammonia in it already so I don't have to add a ton of ammonia!

3. You could but having a bottom drain would be less hassle. Bottom drains are the most effective filter intake thingy in a pond IMO since the waste settles in the bottom.

4. Which tetra pond product are you referring to?
 

maggie thecat

Ponds have to be cycled. They need to build up a biodiverse ecosystem, just like aquaria do. There are many websites describing the steps for both fish in and plant only cycling methods.

Water lettuce is not winter hardy in zones with winters. Some people bring it indoors, other people buy new each year.

Water lettuce and other plants may be restricted as nuisances. Check your state regulations or a local pond supply to find out what plants are legal to stock.

Yes. You can vacuum your pond. They make special siphons for the job.
 

Dandelion-Dream

1. I have no experience with water lettuce so will leave that to someone else

2. I cycle ponds. Fortunately for me the water I use to fill up the ponds has 1-1.5ppm ammonia in it already so I don't have to add a ton of ammonia!

3. You could but having a bottom drain would be less hassle. Bottom drains are the most effective filter intake thingy in a pond IMO since the waste settles in the bottom.

4. Which tetra pond product are you referring to?
Referring to their general reliability as a series.
 

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