Angelfish re-tanking questions...

Toxic Dover

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Hey everyone! It's been a while since I've posted on these forums - life gets busy!

I have a question for everyone. I've currently got a 75 gallon fresh water housing two angels and three cherry barbs. I raised the angels and the cherry barbs together (the angels were roughly the size of a quarter - they're approximately 4" from fin to fin now), so they get along pretty well, but any other fish I try to add the angels seem to make it their mission to kill them. My wife was keeping some tetras in my old 29 gallon, but she's since given up on fish keeping and re-homed the tetras, so now I'm left with two tanks.

Here's where the question comes in... I want to make one of the two tanks a salt water tank, but I'm not sure which one to use for the angels. I could either leave the two angels in the 75 gallon with the 3 cherry barbs and make the 29 gallon a salt tank, or I could put the pair of angels and the three cherries in the 29 gallon and leave them to themselves, and make the larger tank a salt tank. I know that larger quantities of water are a lot easier to control in salt tanks (in fresh water as well I suppose) as far as nitrate levels and all of that, but before I decide I wanted to make sure that a 29 gallon wouldn't be to small for the pair of angels and 3 cherry barbs (I can re-home the cherries if need be).

Anyway, just looking for advice on which way to go... 29 fresh and 75 salt, or vise versa? Any help/insight/advice is greatly appreciated!

-Ben
 

mysticdragon72

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I was told yesterday by an angelfish breeder that 20 gallons for the first fish and 10 for each additional fish is what you need. Not sure if that is for a mated pair or not though.
 

Tolak

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I'd go with the larger 75 if you're new to marine, housing the pair in the 29. As mentioned, the larger volume of water will help for the facet of aquatics you're new to, being familiar with freshwater you'll have no problem with the pair in a 29.

Many breeders will keep pairs in a 20h, I've done this in the past, but upgraded to 29's for pairs a while back. These seem to work better for veil pairs, the 20's work great for the 2nd phase of spawn growout in my breeding setup.

The breeder MD72 mentioned is doing what's correct; keeping people from thinking they can keep a single angel in a 10 gallon. For full grown adults the minimum is 10 gallons per angel, this is to be applied to a group, not an individual angel. I always tell people 10 gallons per angel, minimum of 16" of water depth, this keeps them from tossing one in a 10 gallon.
 
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