Angelfish fin rot. Treating meds question.

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fish Disease' started by bunnybear05, Aug 8, 2015.

  1. bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    So my angel developed quite a case of fin rot ( our filter started having issues, we didn't realize, etc)
    So we fixed that. But its still not better. So I'm setting up a 10 gallon hospital tank now. Going to use our bio media to hopefully instant cycle before I move him into it. Our fish store recommended api tc. tetracycline as a medication. I just wanted to check to see what you guys thought of this stuff for angel fishes ? There is one spot on his body that looks "peely". So i feel that is gotten to the advanced stages. He's still acting totally normal and eating.
    Any advice before I proceed with the meds ?
     
  2. bellachan

    bellachanWell Known MemberMember

    Do you have any pictures of how severe it is? Maybe then people can suggest weather to just keep the angel in a clean, warm tank or add meds. I know in small cases, keeping the water pristine goes a looong way :) and your fish will heal in no time :)
     
  3. OP
    OP
    bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    I'll try to get some in the morning when the tanks lights are on. There are a couple small chunks missing on the fins. Mainly what concerns me is the little peely ball pieces that are by her mouth, gill and (one part of her body )and fin. Not like fuzzy cotton. More like a single white ball. Definitely NOT ick. That we dealt with when we started this tank a couple years ago. And it's not that.

    It's at the point that I would think if it stops deteriorating now, she'd be good. But if this keeps progressing, then I'm not sure. Planning on moving her to the hospital tank tomorrow afternoon. Want to give the tank some time to cycle with the seeded media first. And then waiting to see how she acclimated before medicating. If I could avoid medicating, even better.
     
  4. Tolak

    TolakWell Known MemberMember

    A picture would help. Tetracycline is a good start, do a 50% water change & remed daily for 10-14 days. If you're not seeing results after about 7 days it's time for something a bit stronger, kanamycin or neomycin, depending on your pH.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    I'll post a pic tomorrow when the lights are on. I haven't put her in the hospital tank yet. I will tomorrow (well I guess technically today) in the afternoon. And as long as she acclimated nicely, I was planning on dosing the meds. It says one packet in the tank ( it's a 10gallon) then wait 24 hrs. Then change 25% of the water and add another packet. Then to repeat that process for another 4 days or something like that.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    Also I believe our ph is a bit on the higher side. Last time I tested it, it read about 7.8 or something
     
  7. Tolak

    TolakWell Known MemberMember

    I'm well aware of what the package says, as well as being aware of why they suggest that sort of treatment. As much as we'd like to think that the folks making medications put the welfare of our fish as their highest priority it just isn't that way in the business world. If the average fishkeeper read 50% water change daily & redose for 2 weeks they'd put that product back on the shelf, end result is the loss of a sale.

    Antibiotics don't work a whole lot different in fish, dogs, or humans. That shortened treatment has been researched as to what will sell the product, as well as playing the odds on what might work to cure the fish. It's also what causes resistant strains.

    Kanamycin, sold as Seachem Kanaplex in better stocked shops, or easily available online, works best in water with a higher pH such as yours. This would be the next option if no improvement is seen in a week with the tetracycline.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    Yeah I can see that. I'm more afraid of overdosing the fish ! Lol.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    So I started treating it today. Hope it works. Poor guy is not happy in such a small tank. I feel bad. I guess I should've went bigger. But this is just a temp tank until he's better. My livingroom just doesn't have the space for a temporary 20 gallon too. Nor the funds for one.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    So rereading the directions, it does basically have me doing a full dose every day. Just adds a 25% water change in every couple days.
    I started it today.
     
  11. Coradee

    CoradeeModeratorModerator Member

    I have merged your threads so it doesn't get confusing for you & members replying.
    Please only post one thread per topic
     
  12. OP
    OP
    bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    This poor fish is just not happy. He just don't want to eat. And he has a healthy appetite right up to the minute we put him in the hospital tank. I've tried blood works, garlic guard, flakes, little pellets. Nothing is cutting it. He did put one blood worm in his mouth and the spit it out.
     
  13. Tolak

    TolakWell Known MemberMember

    Fish not eating after being moved isn't unusual at all. Give it a few days.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    Ok last night I saw him eat one pellet. Progress I guess. Just wondering, this is day 4 of treatment and the tank water is so dark. I know discoloration is normal with this treatment. But, it's really dark in there. Is it normally this dark red ?? I've done one 25% water change since Monday like it advised.
     
  15. Tolak

    TolakWell Known MemberMember

    It advises wrong, and I explained why. If you won't take my word for it by all means call the National Fish Pharmacy help line; http://www.nationalfishpharm.com/

    They deal with everything from hobbyists to commercial hatcheries, with any tetracycline based medication they'll advise the same as I have; large daily water changes & remed.
     
  16. Mum

    MumValued MemberMember

    When do you suggest the water change? After 2 doses, one every 24 hours? So dose, wait 24 hours and dose again, wait 24 hours, water change and continue dosing for another 14 days, and then water change again 50%?
     
  17. Tolak

    TolakWell Known MemberMember

    50% daily water change & redose, for 10-14 days. That means dose the tank for the first time, the next day 50% water change & redose, repeat daily. Some medications have a shorter half life, metronidazole is a good example of a short one, and can be redosed with a water change every 8 hours. Gentamycin is one with a really long half life, dose it once, leave it in the tank for 7-10 days.
     
  18. Mum

    MumValued MemberMember

    Tolak, thank you!

    Out of curiosity, why so many water changes? Does the medicine go bad after 24 hours?
     
  19. OP
    OP
    bunnybear05

    bunnybear05Valued MemberMember

    probably cause the water gets so red from the treatment.

    Honestly, I must've missed the 50% water change daily that you suggested. When I read it, I just saw dosing it for 10 days ( instead of the manufacturers recommended 4 days ). I was actually going to keep it up for 10 days but the water got so difficult to see and my fish wouldnt want to eat from all the foam this meds producing. I really hate the color change of the water and the staining that it's doing to the silicone on the tank and killing the good bacteria in my filter. So I just did a big change and put in some carbon to start clearing it out. I've been changing the water every other day since I started treatment and you could barely see inside the tank.
    I'm gonna try just keeping it super clean and see how he does this week. Then try another med that's better if I don't see additional improvement.
     
  20. Tolak

    TolakWell Known MemberMember

    It loses effectiveness, most all medications have a half life, and metabolize into a substance different from the medication used. In terrestrial animals this is eliminated via urine & feces, with fish in a closed environment it's up to us to remove these. Some of these may be harmful, some not. It's impossible to take into account every water, decoration, and fish species situation that may affect a medication, trying to determine if it is indeed harmful or not. Erring on the side of caution removal with water changes isn't going to hurt, and is easier than trying to do a scientific study on every individual tank when time is best spent helping the ailing fish.
     
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