Ammonia Pockets Vs. Plants?

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Kalyn

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Hey everyone,

Is it possible to create a paludrium with a soil/gravel or sand based plateau, and a deep water section, while mitigating or eradicating the possibility of ammonia pockets? Can you do this with heavily-rooted plants?

Or, do y'all have any methods you've used/think would work

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Aquaphobia

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I believe the way it's done is by building a porous platform and covering it in moss or something else to keep the substrate from falling through. I've seen it done with plastic egg crate, the stuff used as diffuser panels on fluorescent lights.
 

ounderfla69

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I watch a demonstration on it, where the guy used porous clay balls wrapped in tool, a netting sold in fabric stores, or you can use lava rock wrapped in tool. By wrapping it in tool, it makes it easier to position. Then add pea gravel over the bags to help fill in big areas. Then you can put dirt over that.
 

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You can also make the platform out of a foam insulation base covered in hydraulic cement. I used this way to make a background, but it would work the same way for this. Then you don't have to worry about any gradual leveling of the substrate.

Here's a link to an instructable sort of like the background I made:

Make a 3D Aquarium Background - All
 

Aquaphobia

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ounderfla69 said:
I watch a demonstration on it, where the guy used porous clay balls wrapped in tool, a netting sold in fabric stores, or you can use lava rock wrapped in tool. By wrapping it in tool, it makes it easier to position. Then add pea gravel over the bags to help fill in big areas. Then you can put dirt over that.
To make it easier to find, the spelling is "tulle"

GreyShoes said:
You can also make the platform out of a foam insulation base covered in hydraulic cement. I used this way to make a background, but it would work the same way for this. Then you don't have to worry about any gradual leveling of the substrate.
I would worry about anaerobic decomposition setting in where the water doesn't flow so easily. Not sure that's a good idea for the whole base...
 
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Kalyn

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Thank you! This is very helpful! ))

I was also thinking of maybe making a little pvc tunnel for fish/shrimp to swim through and maybe submerge the higher area with ~2 inches of water. *u* Give them shallows to hang out in.
 
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*insert evil cackling here*

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Aquaphobia

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I have those hydro balls! Keep them corralled. The blasted things float!
 
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Kalyn

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Aquaphobia said:
I have those hydro balls! Keep them corralled. The blasted things float!
Woohoo! I lined them with gravelly which seems to be weighing them down. ))

The tank is a bit cloudy, but I'll post pictures when it clears It looks a little weird, but I have high hopes for t+3months!
 
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Kalyn

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Have an ugly in-progress picture:
8710dc9f000024ef73ddd01a24c5b5c6.jpg


(I definitely added an Instagram filter to make it look more green...)


Edit: I need a little more gravel, or to pick out some of the visible hydroballs. Laziness is suggesting more gravel.

I also plan to distribute my java moss more evenly/nicely, and to cover the pvc more effectively.

The shaping of the raised area was changed, because I wanted to appreciate it more; before it wasn't really visible:
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Mild insanity. This is that betta's tank; he is removed during remodeling


>.> <.< the non Instagram filtered version

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Photos from today's additions

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Aquaphobia

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Cool! Why does the inside of the pipe look blue? It's pretty!
 
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Aquaphobia said:
Cool! Why does the inside of the pipe look blue? It's pretty!
Thank you!!

It has a bendy submersible led light from Petco inside!
 

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It looks really good!
 
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Wow, that looks great! I understand what you mean about the anaerobic decompression. You definitely need water to flow correctly through the aquarium. I did a few testing cycles before I decided on the background I did to make sure there were no pockets of stagnant water. I was planning on using the cement technique again for a Cichlid tank for a friend, but I like your use of PVC piping and I think I'll be incorporating it for a few caves and swim-throughs to reduce a bit of stress on the fish (it'll be in a pretty heavily trafficked area). Again, your tank looks great!
 
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GreyShoes said:
Wow, that looks great! I understand what you mean about the anaerobic decompression. You definitely need water to flow correctly through the aquarium. I did a few testing cycles before I decided on the background I did to make sure there were no pockets of stagnant water. I was planning on using the cement technique again for a Cichlid tank for a friend, but I like your use of PVC piping and I think I'll be incorporating it for a few caves and swim-throughs to reduce a bit of stress on the fish (it'll be in a pretty heavily trafficked area). Again, your tank looks great!
Thank you!! I'm so glad that I've inspired related projects for you! *u*

I bet they'd get more use from cichlids than a betta, too! If/when you do it, please post pictures; I'd be excited to see!
 
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Update:
 

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Update

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Aquaphobia

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Cool! So can he swim into the "blue hole" at the bottom there and out through the one at the top of the hill?
 
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