Ammonia Levels Won't Drop Fishless Cycle

ace22

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I have been Trying to cycle my tank for over 3 weeks now with fish food. Last time I posted I wasn't getting an ammonia reading but I was using test strips. I got the apI liquid kit and my ammonia reading was a 4ppm and hasn't dropped since.. my nitrite levels are at 0ppm and my nitrate levels are at 0ppm.. Any suggestions on how I can get my tank yo start cycling?
 

TwoHedWlf

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ace22 said:
I have been Trying to cycle my tank for over 3 weeks now with fish food. Last time I posted I wasn't getting an ammonia reading but I was using test strips. I got the apI liquid kit and my ammonia reading was a 4ppm and hasn't dropped since.. my nitrite levels are at 0ppm and my nitrate levels are at 0ppm.. Any suggestions on how I can get my tank yo start cycling?
4ppm is high enough it's probably killing off the bacteria.

Do a water change to get it down to around 2ppm, stop dumping so much fish food in, wait.
 
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ace22

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TwoHedWlf said:
4ppm is high enough it's probably killing off the bacteria.

Do a water change to get it down to around 2ppm, stop dumping so much fish food in, wait.

I haven't 'dumped' any fish food in since I got the testing kit and found the ammonia levels were so high. I was reluctant to do a water change as I read it can slow down the cycling process in a fishless cycle. I will try a water change though and see what happens to the levels. Thank you
 

Xsolidice

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ace22 said:
I haven't 'dumped' any fish food in since I got the testing kit and found the ammonia levels were so high. I was reluctant to do a water change as I read it can slow down the cycling process in a fishless cycle. I will try a water change though and see what happens to the levels. Thank you
Water holds ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Your surfaces (substrate, decorations, filter, ect) hold the bacteria. It's a balancing act. The bacteria breaks down the ammonia and you end up with nitrate which just means your tank is cycling. Water changes are the only way to remove the nitrates, which aren't particularly harmful, but you do want to keep the levels on the low side. What is your bacteria source?
 
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ace22

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Xsolidice said:
Water holds ammonia, nitrites, and nitrates. Your surfaces (substrate, decorations, filter, ect) hold the bacteria. It's a balancing act. The bacteria breaks down the ammonia and you end up with nitrate which just means your tank is cycling. Water changes are the only way to remove the nitrates, which aren't particularly harmful, but you do want to keep the levels on the low side. What is your bacteria source?

At the moment I am only getting an ammonia reading. I used fish food to start the cycling process. I have a mixture of sand and gravel, a filter and a few ornaments, a few fake plants and a few live plants in the tank
 

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Ammonia reading of 4 can stall your cycle. Not sure the exact number but at some point it becomes poisonous even to the bacteria.
 
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conniedavid1978 said:
Ammonia reading of 4 can stall your cycle. Not sure the exact number but at some point it becomes poisonous even to the bacteria.
Would a water change bring this down Then? And how much of a water change should I do?
 

TwoHedWlf

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ace22 said:
Would a water change bring this down Then? And how much of a water change should I do?
Of course. Water change is the most effective thing. Do a 50% water change and it will bring it down to about 2ppm.
 
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ace22

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TwoHedWlf said:
Of course. Water change is the most effective thing. Do a 50% water change and it will bring it down to about 2ppm.
Thank you will do this after work. I've just had a look at my real plants and they don't seem to be doing very well. Do you think this would have anything to do with high ammonia levels ?
 

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ace22 said:
Thank you will do this after work. I've just had a look at my real plants and they don't seem to be doing very well. Do you think this would have anything to do with high ammonia levels ?
Could be. You're basically bathing them in dilute window cleaner.
 

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