Help Ammonia In Tap Water

mlash

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You could just use bottled water. Two 5 gallon water bottles ($5) at a water machine!
 

Momgoose56

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I kept betta over the years and never had to worry about all of this until i went to guppies. I have not moved in the last 12 years
If you have not moved, then your water has probably always had ammonia in it. Test your tank water 12 to 24 hours after a water change. If your tank tests negative for ammonia, then no worries.
 

ystrout

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My tap water has ammonia too. It's from the chloramine my city uses in the tap water. It is about .5ppm, similar to what you're showing.

If your tank is cycled it's not an issue at all. Your biological filter will consume that ammonia in a few hours. And SeaChem Prime keeps it non-toxic far longer than that.

Assuming you have a fully cycled tank, doing 30% water changes with .5 ammonia only raises it to around .15ppm, which is negligible for a few hours, especially if it is neutralized by Prime.
 
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Guppyapocalypse

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With the way the ammonia has been i was doing 50% changes daily. And the levels will not drop. I guess detoxifying while i get some zeolite and bio media is my only option. I am so frustrated i am about to just give up. My two cycled tanks have crashed and now i am fighting the ammonia daily. I can't keep up with this being 32 weeks pregnant myself
 

Zigi Zig

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With the way the ammonia has been i was doing 50% changes daily. And the levels will not drop. I guess detoxifying while i get some zeolite and bio media is my only option. I am so frustrated i am about to just give up. My two cycled tanks have crashed and now i am fighting the ammonia daily. I can't keep up with this being 32 weeks pregnant myself
It is ok 30-50% partial water changes every day. However the key points to remember are make sure your tap water parameters match (at least closely) to your tank, including temperature. If they are quite different, you can break up water changes to smaller, 25% changes twice daily to avoid shocking and stressing your fish.
 
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Guppyapocalypse

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I will do as suggested. I cannot give up because my 11 year old son loves these fish and he is the one wanting to breed and sell them. He does help but i am fast approaching the point where i will not be able to help him. I don't want him saddled with all these water changes alone, but preterm labor is a real risk for me so i will have to step away soon.
 

Momgoose56

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I will do as suggested. I cannot give up because my 11 year old son loves these fish and he is the one wanting to breed and sell them. He does help but i am fast approaching the point where i will not be able to help him. I don't want him saddled with all these water changes alone, but preterm labor is a real risk for me so i will have to step away soon.
Just test and treat your tanks with Seachem Prime every 48 hours and only do water changes if your ammonia goes over 1ppm. You're working at it way too hard.
 
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Guppyapocalypse

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The ppm are at 4-8 withe test we did hours ago. The same after a 50% water change. The ammonia is locked with the api ammo lock wich is why the fish are fine. He will test again in the morning
 

Momgoose56

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The ppm are at 4-8 with test we did hours ago. The same after a 50% water change. The ammonia is locked with the api ammo lock wich is why the fish are fine. He will test again in the morning
You can't exchange 100% of water with 8ppm ammonia in it with water with 1ppm ammonia (the photo) and end up with a tank full of water with 8 ppm ammonia in it. Do bigger water changes. Do a 90% water change. Leave 2" of water in the bottom of the tank when you drain it. Refill, recheck. If still over 2 ppm, do another 90% water change, recheck. Two big water changes will bring your ammonia down. You've always had ammonia in your water apparently, it's not a new problem. You've just not been doing big enough water changes on this tank and the level has built up to the point that your nitrifying bacteria can't keep up with it. Test your hot water as H Farnsworth said above. The ammonia may have evaporated out of it in your water heater. Cool that and use it in your tank if you want.
 
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Guppyapocalypse

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I did as you suggested and after a 90% then a 50% it is finally down to .50-1ppm. I used the prime. I stored all filter media, decorations, and plants in a bucket of old tank water.
Using some of the better tank water i used to hold the fish i have the filter media soaking with a dose of API quick start bacteria.

Thankfully there is a hose and faucet outside my son's window. It lightened the load. Resting right now before i even try to start on the next tank.
 

Momgoose56

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I did as you suggested and after a 90% then a 50% it is finally down to .50-1ppm. I used the prime. I stored all filter media, decorations, and plants in a bucket of old tank water.
Using some of the better tank water i used to hold the fish i have the filter media soaking with a dose of API quick start bacteria.

Thankfully there is a hose and faucet outside my son's window. It lightened the load. Resting right now before i even try to start on the next tank.
Are you taking all that stuff out of your tank every time you do a water change? You don't have to remove anything from your tank or filter just to change water and vacuum the tank. Including fish. You just siphon water out and run water back in. Are you aware of that?
 
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