Already Have Caribsea Sand. Thinking About Getting Seachem Flourite Sand

bluesky2111

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So I have a 75gal tank with Caribsea sand (natural color) in it. The tank is established but I don't like the sand's yellowish color. So I'm thinking about getting Seachem flourite black sand. I have 2 options:

1. Scoop everything out and replace with Seachem sand. This option is more expensive because I'd need 3-4 bags. Also it stresses the fish and makes the tank recycle.

2. Just put Seachem sand on top of Caribsea. The substrate in my tank is not that deep anyway, only about 2in, so this option is more cost efficient and wouldn't spoil the tank's ecosystem. But I feel weird because Flourite is supposed to be holding/absorbing root tabs better than generic sand, so Flourite needs to be at the bottom layer. But I could be wrong.

I'm confused. Please help me out.
 

nope

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Putting generic substrate on top of plant-specific substrate isn't necessary, its just going for a good look. If you like how the flourite black looks better than the other sand, I'm pretty sure you can just put it on top.
 

-Mak-

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So here's a bit of info: Flourite is not nutrient rich. In fact, it's just baked clay gravel. Unlike aquasoils, it doesn't contain humus, which is the organic, nutrient rich component of soil. If you look at its mineral composition, it doesn't contain nitrogen*, phosphorus, or sulfur*, the first two being two of the three most needed nutrients. It also doesn't contain boron, chlorine*, or molybdenum, which are micronutrients. Also, the minerals that are present may be locked into the soil and are not unusable.

*edit - I would like to correct myself. The EPA method Seachem used has not been validated for these three elements, so I'm guessing they cannot tell with these three, but I still doubt the presence of some due to the lack of humus/organic matter.


Marketing is misleading - my biggest tip for anyone is this hobby is to research before you buy!

For plants, inert substrate like sand has no benefit, so I would remove it completely. Most bacteria is in the filter if the substrate is non-porous, like sand. If you go the potting soil route, you are correct in thinking that the sand should go on top of the potting soil to prevent clouding. If you choose an aquarium specific aquasoil, no cap is needed.
 
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bluesky2111

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nope said:
Putting generic substrate on top of plant-specific substrate isn't necessary, its just going for a good look. If you like how the flourite black looks better than the other sand, I'm pretty sure you can just put it on top.
Thank you. Does it affect how the Flourite functions, if I put root tabs in? because Flourite is supposed to be holding/absorbing root tabs better than generic sand, so Flourite needs to be at the bottom layer. But I could be wrong.

-Mak- said:
So here's a bit of info: Flourite is not nutrient rich. In fact, it's just baked clay gravel. Unlike aquasoils, it doesn't contain humus, which is the organic, nutrient rich component of soil. If you look at its mineral composition, it doesn't contain nitrogen, phosphorus, or sulfur, the first two being two of the three most needed nutrients. It also doesn't contain boron, chlorine, or molybdenum, which are micronutrients. Also, the minerals that are present may be locked into the soil and are not unusable.

Marketing is misleading - my biggest tip for anyone is this hobby is to research before you buy!

For plants, inert substrate like sand has no benefit, so I would remove it completely. Most bacteria is in the filter if the substrate is non-porous, like sand. If you go the potting soil route, you are correct in thinking that the sand should go on top of the potting soil to prevent clouding. If you choose an aquarium specific aquasoil, no cap is needed.
Thanks so much for the info, I'll think about it
 

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