Question Alleopathy and plants not working together in the aquarium ecosystem and Water Changes

Nikao

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All,

I have learned that since plants produce chemicals to protect themselves, they can inhibit the growth other plants and other organisms including bacteria or even kill them.

I'm concerned because I had ignorantly bought 80 dollar of plants a few months ago. Maybe they don't work together? Maybe some will out compete each other? Maybe their presence affects my fish?

I wouldn't have known about these things..but should I really be concerned if I do the 50% Water Changes every week?

And, should I really be concerned about taking out too much dissolve organic carbon out of the water with frequent water changes?

Thanks
 

-Mak-

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There's very little info or research about allelopathy in aquatic plants, and there's not really evidence to suggest that it affects planted aquariums. I would say that, though it could be possible, it shouldn't worry you at all. Thousands of hobbyists keep heavily planted tanks without issue. Google "Dutch aquascape." It's clearly not a big issue if these kinds of tanks can exist :)
Competition is definitely a thing though, some faster growing plants can overtake other plants they aren't trimmed back. This is a result of growth rate differences, not allelopathy

What do you mean by dissolved organic carbon? There is dissolved CO2 gas or dissolved carbon compounds. CO2 gas will always stay the same in water because it equilibrates with air. The only way to increase CO2 is to inject pressurized pure CO2 gas. Carbon compounds like Excel can be dosed but they aren't CO2, and don't replace CO2.
 
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Nikao

Nikao

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I'm talking about DOC that is created by plant decay that feeds microbes like bacteria.....I just didn't know if there was a balance between doing WCs to get rid of toxin like ammonia and nitrites and chemicals from allelopathy versus getting rid of good things in the water that benefit the ecosystem. Like aren't there important things IN the water that keep fish healthy??

AND, does having lots of plants control everything without water changes if done right so no WCs?
 

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Nikao said:
I'm talking about DOC that is created by plant decay that feeds microbes like bacteria.....I just didn't know if there was a balance between doing WCs to get rid of toxin like ammonia and nitrites and chemicals from allelopathy versus getting rid of good things in the water that benefit the ecosystem. Like aren't there important things IN the water that keep fish healthy??

AND, does having lots of plants control everything without water changes if done right so no WCs?
Ah! Thought you were talking about CO2 related carbon.

You'd really want to remove excess organics because algae potentially feeds upon them as well. Carbon compounds are broken down by various microorganisms but it's not really essential to have them nor do they affect fish. What keeps fish healthy is the water hardness and various inorganic ions.

Plants remove ammonia and nitrates, but don't replenish minerals, don't remove organic waste immediately, so water changes are sill needed :)
 
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Nikao

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I'm surprised that you say that fish are kept healthy by various inorganics....I thought that life on earth was sustained by things like carbohydrates, protein, and lipids....all which are organic compounds.

How do inorganic ions come into play? Like suflur?
 

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Nikao said:
I'm surprised that you say that fish are kept healthy by various inorganics....I thought that life on earth was sustained by things like carbohydrates, protein, and lipids....all which are organic compounds.

How do inorganic ions come into play? Like suflur?
More like metal ions and dissolved salts that contribute to osmoregulation.

And yeah fish do need those organic compounds, but they obtain them by consumption, and organics in the water don't affect them.
 

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