Algae Eating Fish

Discussion in 'Aquarium Stocking Questions' started by Anna94, Apr 9, 2017.

  1. Anna94

    Anna94Valued MemberMember

    I have green algae and diatoms. I'm being told different fish/invertebrates will eat green algae and diatoms (amano shrimp, nerite snails, bristlenose plecos, otos, and gouramis) so Idk which ones to go with. I have an oto right now and was gonna get a few more, but if there is something better out there I'll go that route. Which fish/invertebrate will better to eat green algae and diatoms? I also heard/read that plecos are poop machines and not really worth it so I would like to avoid those.
     
  2. Monrankim

    MonrankimNew MemberMember

    Otto's are fantastic. They are a schooling fish though but it seems like you already know that. Amano shrimp are also a great addition to a tank. I enjoy watching them
     
  3. _IceFyre_

    _IceFyre_Well Known MemberMember

    You shouldn't really buy fish just to clean the tank - that's your job!:)
    However, Nerite snails are the best algae cleaners that I've found and don't add much to your bioload.
     




  4. aquatickeeper

    aquatickeeperFishlore VIPMember

    Yeah, I'm with the nerite snails
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Anna94

    Anna94Valued MemberMember

    I'll still do water changes, but I have algae on the back glass and I can't move the tank away from the wall to get back there to scrub it off so I was looking at getting fish or snails to get rid of it for me.
     




  6. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    What is the size of your aquarium, and what is your current stock? Also, is the tank cycled?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Anna94

    Anna94Valued MemberMember

    For the most part, the tank is cycled. I have 10-20 nitrates, 0 nitrites, and 0.25 or 0.50 ammonia. My tank is a 20 gallon long and I have 16 fish:
    6 cardinal tetras
    3 Celebes rainbows
    1 horseface loach
    1 kribensis
    5 lemon tetras

    I have an oto, but I might rehome him or trade him in at my lfs and get a few nerite snails.
     
  8. _IceFyre_

    _IceFyre_Well Known MemberMember

    I would just get one Nerite, as you have some stocking issues if you'd like to discuss them:)
     
  9. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    Do you have ammonia in your tap?

    What is your lighting, how long is it on? How often do you feed your fish? What type of filter do you have and how many gallons per hour does it cycle?

    The oto will eat diatoms but there really isn't anything that eats spot algae. Nerite snails will eat diatoms as well and are less sensitive than otos. Otos and nerites both work better when kept in multiples and not single specimens. You have a few stocking issues as well if you want to discuss them with anyone.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Anna94

    Anna94Valued MemberMember

    0 ammonia in my tap. I have a Beamswork tank light that was on 12 hrs. but I reduced it to 8 hrs. I feed my fish once every other day. My filter is an AquaClear 50 and I also have a sponge filter rated for up to 40 gallons that is being run by a powerhead.

    I know I have stocking issues, but I can't get rid of my horseface loach as my mom's work schedule is so busy that I can't get to my lfs to trade him in and the few friends I do have (if you want to consider them friends) don't have fish tanks and neither do any of my family members so I can't give him to them so right now I'm stuck with him. My one friend does have a few goldfish, but they're in a little pond outside and there is no substrate in it so the horseface loach would not fit in well there.

    I know I have stocking issues, but I can't get rid of my horseface loach as my mom's work schedule is so busy that I can't get to my lfs to trade him in and the few friends I do have (if you want to consider them friends) don't have fish tanks and neither do any of my family members so I can't give him to them so right now I'm stuck with him. My one friend does have a few goldfish, but they're in a little pond outside and there is no substrate in it so the horseface loach would not fit in well there.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 9, 2017
  11. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    Reduce your photoperiod to 6 hours and do 50% water changes weekly, should cut down on some of the algae. Is your tank planted?
     
  12. OP
    OP
    Anna94

    Anna94Valued MemberMember

    No, I was looking into putting plants in my filter, but I don't really have proper lighting.
     
  13. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    There are a lot of plants that will grow in low lighting. Do you know the color wavelength of your lighting (Kelvin)? It will be displayed as <number>K, such as 6500K.

    Plants will compete with algae while also making your water cleaner.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    Anna94

    Anna94Valued MemberMember

    I have no idea. It's a Beamswork EA FSpec. The other light is from my bedroom light.
     
  15. Fahn

    FahnFishlore VIPMember

    If you can find where it is sold online they may have specs for it.
     
  16. MikeRad89

    MikeRad89Well Known MemberMember

    Nerites did little to nothing for me except clean up diatoms in a newer tank.

    SAE will clean green algae and BBA, and in my experience is the only species to do so.
     
  17. OP
    OP
    Anna94

    Anna94Valued MemberMember

    What is SAE?
     
  18. BottomDweller

    BottomDwellerFishlore VIPMember

    A SAE is a Siamese algae eater
     
  19. Thunder_o_b

    Thunder_o_bFishlore VIPMember

    Ottos in my experence are hands down the best for algae and diatoms. BUT they are notoriously hard to keep alive.... Although we do have members that have no issues with them. I believe @DoubleDutch is one. BN are cool fish but are not realy that good at cleaning algae. We have several.
     
  20. adsm08

    adsm08Valued MemberMember

    I agree it is the tank owner's job to clean the tank. I don't generally consider algae control to be part of that. In almost every aquatic ecosystem in the wild there is going to be something that eats that algae, a fish, a snail, a shrimp, a homeless guy who needs sandwich condiments. IMHO a big part of building and having a tank is to try and recreate that ecosystem as closely as you can, which naturally means an algae eater of some sort. That makes algae control by a tank inhabitant a must-have. Just my opinion.
     






  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice