Air pump and air stone

kkw
  • #1
I am new to the whole aquarium world, but am very interested and wanting to learn. I am getting a 29 gallon tank soon and I have a question about air pumps and air stones. I know about cycling tanks and all that so no need to worry. I realize that with a tank that size aeration would be necessary. My question is, how exactly do you set it up? Obviously, the tube runs from the pump to the tank and the stone on the end of the tube. But where do you put it all? Do you run the tube down a corner and put the stone under the gravel? Put the stone on top of the gravel? What exactly does the stone do? Does the stone release oxygen? Any help would be greatly appreciated!
 
Alessa
  • #2
Ok, you can pretty much put it under the gravel so that it does not show. Air pumps and airstones work pretty much in two ways:

1) when the bubbles formed are small enough they introduce oxygen to the tank and take out carbon dioxide.

2) Nevertheles, this is not always enough because the bubbles sometimes aren't small enough and don't stay in the water a long time, so what they do is create some current in the surface, creating gas exchange and introducing oxygen to the tank.

Welcome to FL! you will get a lot of great advice in fishkeeping and great advice from awesome people!
 
pepetj
  • #3
HI kkw: Welcome to fishlore!
Airpump-Airstones are a nice looking complement for tanks. I personally use them in all my tanks, not only they look good, but fish tend to enjoy them. You could either let the tube hand in there, attach it to the corners with sylicon, or use ventose-clips that are sold for that purpose (the ones available down here are black). The major problem I've had is the noise they make. I have Elite 801 for 5.5 and 10gal , and Tetra Whisper 40 for the 29gal bow. The Whisper is definetly less prone to rattle. I place my pumps at the rear side, over a plastic platform (easy to find accesory); but have noticed that sometimes they are placed either hanging from the wall (hooked) or in a small shelf above the tank.

Most dissolved O2 comes from agitation of the water surface (e.g. HOB filters, powerheads). I do place them (buried) in the substrate (either gravel or sand, or both) and place them along the rear wall of the tank. I use a check-flow valve (to prevent water entering/damaging the pump) at the output of the pumt, and use a plactic distributor -two or three outputs- to regulate airflow. Some stones can be connected in serial, but I rather use individual lines for ease of maintenance (airstones should be replaced at some point).

Make sure you get a model of airpump that can handle multiple airstones. In my opinion, it's worth it.

Pepe
Santo Domingo
 
COBettaCouple
  • #4
Welcome to FishLore.

I like to run an air hose from the air pump to a gang valve. Then an air hose from the gang valve to the aeration device in the tank. Air stones, I like to put about 2/3 of the way down the tank wall but I mainly like to use flexible bubble wands.
 
michellem
  • #5
Hey everyone!! I was wondering, is there a big difference between gang valves and check valves. I have heard they basically do the same thing, is this the case? I am in the process of hooking up more aeration. Thanks!
 
soldieroffortune1974
  • #6
Gang valves allow you to hook up more than 1 line to 1 pump,(some as many as 10) and control the rate of air flow through each line.

Check valves,ensure 1 way directional flow;from the pump to the device.In the event of a power outtage (or something similar) the check valve will stop water from siphoning up the tube into the air pump.
 
sirdarksol
  • #7
Check valves,ensure 1 way directional flow;from the pump to the device.In the event of a power outtage (or something similar) the check valve will stop water from siphoning up the tube into the air pump.

They are also helpful when the cat decides to pull the tubing out of the air pump. They keep the line from creating a siphon and dumping ten or more gallons of brackish water in your sock drawer, from which it filters down into your pants drawer, and then into your wife's sweater drawer.
 
bluealuefish
  • #8
They are also helpful when the cat decides to pull the tubing out of the air pump. They keep the line from creating a siphon and dumping ten or more gallons of brackish water in your sock drawer, from which it filters down into your pants drawer, and then into your wife's sweater drawer.

LOL omg that would be horrendous.. but funny. rofl
 
Escobar
  • #9
Just something to also bear in mind that the bubbles released from the air stones are NOT oxygen. These bubbles will rise to the surface and break the surface tension which causes oxygen to enter the tank water.. Many people think the bubble released from the airstones are oxygen but this is clearly not the case.
 
ScarfaceShaz
  • #10
it is air, which will infact contain a % of oxygen, which then breaks the water tension at the surface of the water allowing more air to enter the water. ie increasing the waters dissolved oxygen level...
Its a nice feature as well as required if your fishes and swimmimg near the surface and gasping for air..
 
sirdarksol
  • #11
LOL omg that would be horrendous.. but funny. rofl

I am sure others find it funny. I, however, do not, as that took quite a bit of cleanup. ;D

Just something to also bear in mind that the bubbles released from the air stones are NOT oxygen. These bubbles will rise to the surface and break the surface tension which causes oxygen to enter the tank water.. Many people think the bubble released from the airstones are oxygen but this is clearly not the case.

How is this "clearly not the case"? The bubbles released are normal atmosphere: a mix of nitrogen, oxygen, CO2, and other gasses. Gas exchange is similar to osmosis; it tries to even out the different levels of gas on either side of the surface of the water. The speed at which this happens depends on how much surface area there is (among other things). This is where the bubbles come in.
Each individual bubble has very little surface area, but there are thousands of them in the water column at any time, and thus they present a lot of surface area (in my 35g, they present more surface area than the actual surface of the water). This speeds the gas exchange.

In addition, the bubbles stir the water, which helps keep the water fresh (no dead spots that build up CO2).
 
Lucy
  • #12
They are also helpful when the cat decides to pull the tubing out of the air pump. They keep the line from creating a siphon and dumping ten or more gallons of brackish water in your sock drawer, from which it filters down into your pants drawer, and then into your wife's sweater drawer.

LOL omg that would be horrendous.. but funny. rofl

I am sure others find it funny. I, however, do not, as that took quite a bit of cleanup. ;D

I giggled the first time I read it and it's still funny the second time I'm reading it.
Of course, if it happened to me, it wouldn't be near as funny.
 
michellem
  • #13
Ok guys, I just hooked up my air pump and I love it!! I think it looks great, I just hope my fish gets better and is able to enjoy the new addition. There hasnt been any change, he won't eat, he seldom moves, I think he kinda looks a little bloated now? I am just sick over it, I don't know what else to do? Water parameters are still the same, no changes. I am doing 25% water changes every day. STUMPED!!
 
Drew 43920
  • #14
The air has some O2...?

Just something to also bear in mind that the bubbles released from the air stones are NOT oxygen. These bubbles will rise to the surface and break the surface tension which causes oxygen to enter the tank water.. Many people think the bubble released from the air stones are oxygen but this is clearly not the case.

The air has some O2 in it ....
drew
 

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