Air For 2.5g Tank

W.L.
  • #1
Hi, does anybody know how much surface agitation is required for a small 2.5gallon tank with one small goldfish? The dimensions of the tank are 12 x 6 x 8 and I have a small PENN PLAX World Aquarium Filter running but the air coming out of the top is making a bit of noise so I was wondering if can block it with something to dampen the bubbles but worry that it might also remove the surface agitation of the water. Is surface agitation needed or would the water circulation (caused by the filter) be sufficient?
 
tocandesu
  • #2
Well as long as the surface is moving, you'll have enough agitation. However, there is a bigger issue with your stocking. I wouldn't keep a goldfish in a 2.5 gallon.
 
FlipFlopFishFlake
  • #3
Hi, does anybody know how much surface agitation is required for a small 2.5gallon tank with one small goldfish? The dimensions of the tank are 12 x 6 x 8 and I have a small PENN PLAX World Aquarium Filter running but the air coming out of the top is making a bit of noise so I was wondering if can block it with something to dampen the bubbles but worry that it might also remove the surface agitation of the water. Is surface agitation needed or would the water circulation (caused by the filter) be sufficient?
Water circulation isn't your biggest concern right now. A 2.5 gallon isn't suitable to hold a goldfish in, even a juvenile. Goldfish grow huge, with the fancy goldfish growing 8 inches and singletails can reach over a foot and a half. They produce huge amounts of waste, and need massive tanks (or even ponds) if they are common or comet goldfish. I would recommend either rehoming or returning the fish before problems much more serious than those attributed to lack of water circulation begin to occur.
 
EbiAqua
  • #4
Hi,

If you bought this goldfish I would return it. If you won it at a fair or carnival see if your neighbors have a fish pond, or take it to an LFS. The only fish that you can realistically keep in 2.5 gallons is a betta.
 
W.L.
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
In terms of visible movement, it is moving very very little (tiny vibrations) so I was wondering if circulation would be enough.

As for stocking, it's a small injured goldfish (a little over an inch) that is missing a fin and can't swim very well. Before it was in a regular size tank with other fishes but it kept staying stationed under a plant in the bottom back corner and couldn't go up to the surface for food so I separated it into its own tank where it can eat sinking pellets and move around safely.
 
BReefer97
  • #6
Ah! Ignore this as I just say your reply
 
EbiAqua
  • #7
In terms of visible movement, it is moving very very little (tiny vibrations) so I was wondering if circulation would be enough.

As for stocking, it's a small injured goldfish (a little over an inch) that is missing a fin and can't swim very well. Before it was in a regular size tank with other fishes but it kept staying stationed under a plant in the bottom back corner and couldn't go up to the surface for food so I separated it into its own tank where it can eat sinking pellets and move around safely.

If the 2.5 is just a recovery tank and not long term, may I suggest, instead, a large Rubbermaid tub? Cheap, easy to find and you can get one over 20 gallons. Just put your filter on it and keep the water clean.

Recovery in the 2.5 will be difficult because such a small volume of water is hard to keep stable and clean, especially with a goldfish.
 
W.L.
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
And of course, I'll monitor its emotional and physical recovery to see if it can be returned to the regular tank.
 
tocandesu
  • #9
In that case, I recommend a breeding net. It'll let you monitor the goldfish while it's in the main tank where you can keep the water quality stable.
 
BReefer97
  • #10
I agree with Fahn. It’s going to be really hard to have a goldfish with a missing fin recover in such a small tank. Purely because they produce massive amounts of waste and it would require multiple water changes a day to keep the ammonia build up from causing further damage. I can’t imagine being able to hold a cycle in a 2.5 gallon with a goldfish; of any size. A larger tank offers a chance to dilute their waste so there’s less of a need for so many frequent water changes.
 
W.L.
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
I've been testing water quality every other day for the past few weeks and so far have had no issues and change water frequently with prime. The breeding nets I've seen are rather small but I'll look into trying a divider. Any other ideas are welcomed!
 
BottomDweller
  • #12
How big is the main tank?
 
W.L.
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
It's 35 gallons and I've had goldfish in it for 15+ years.
 
SpaceKitten
  • #14
Your biggest issue is having a goldfish in a 2.5G
25 for one goldfish minimum and an extra ten for each extra goldfish.
 
W.L.
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
There may be a lot of "guides" online but there is no exact rule on how many X gallons is needed for X goldfish as long as the tank does not hinder their need for space and movement (I'll go into water quality later). For ex. if you have a very active fish then you obviously should have a large tank for them to swim freely. But if you have a fish that is stationary and hiding, the goal is to provide them a space that makes them feel safe, comfortable, and in control before moving them to a bigger space. And you can determine this by how often and how far they venture out of their stationary zone each day.

The size of a tank does not ensure "water quality." Water quality is based on the chemical makeup of the water itself. For large tanks, cycling is needed for bacteria to reduce bad chemicals in the water because it's expensive and labor intensive to change water all the time. But if you can monitor and change small amounts of water frequently then you can still achieve good water quality without relying on bacteria which is the logic behind a lot of trickle water change systems - which is probably an ideal system if you have the tools/resources to do it.

Ultimately, it is a matter of how much care and attention is given to the tank and its inhabitants. For most tanks and their owners, the goal is to set it up in a way that requires minimal maintenance and effort but that doesn't apply to every tank and owner.
 
Sh899y
  • #16
There may be a lot of "guides" online but there is no exact rule on how many X gallons is needed for X goldfish as long as the tank does not hinder their need for space and movement (I'll go into water quality later). For ex. if you have a very active fish then you obviously should have a large tank for them to swim freely. But if you have a fish that is stationary and hiding, the goal is to provide them a space that makes them feel safe, comfortable, and in control before moving them to a bigger space. And you can determine this by how often and how far they venture out of their stationary zone each day.

Ultimately, it is a matter of how much care and attention is given to the tank and its inhabitants. For most tanks and their owners, the goal is to set it up in a way that requires minimal maintenance and effort but that doesn't apply to every tank and owner.

If you never give a fish the opportunity to be active then how would you know what its preference is?

I also think the last statement is a sweeping generalisation of fish tank owners.
 
W.L.
  • Thread Starter
  • #17
A 2.5 gallon tank is a feet long which is much bigger than a breeder net as someone suggested here (which is what a lot of people use for something like this). So the fish does have space to swim and have been moving around vs staying in one place in the 35 gallon tank.
 

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