Aggressive Kribensis

Jamieb284
  • #1
HI there, in the shop they stated that a Kribensis is a peaceful fish and suited to a community tank... I spoke to a member of staff and they said the same thing.

However, I have purchased two and one keeps chasing my guppies, tetras and the other Kribensis (I have 2, the dominant one looks very fat and colourful, the other looks very colourless and quite skinny, bought like that).

Any advice please?


 
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nicole4434
  • #2
Are they both male and fighting for territory, or do you have a male chasing the female situation (which will make them more aggressive when they spawn towards your other fish as they will protect their young)
 
Jamieb284
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
Well I asked for a male/ female pair but the guy was young and I don't think he knows how to sex them. If I can get pics, I will show you them to see if you're able to possibly tell the difference.


 
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nicole4434
  • #4
Heres a quote from this site

"Sexing Kribensis cichlids is not difficult, because the female fish is smaller, has a larger belly and displays brighter colours. During the breeding season her belly will get the characteristic cherry red colour. Another way of sexing Kribensis is to look at the fins; the dorsal fin of the male ends in a point.
Kribensis will form monogamous pairs and once a couple has been established you can expect them to spawn and raise young over and over again. Many aquarists provide breeding couples with their own separate tank since they tend to defend egg and fry violently."
 
Jamieb284
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
These are the photos. The aggressive one is the most colourful one. The first pic of both of them on the first day I got them and the 2nd and 3rd pics are today. (Best pics I can get at the minute)


ImageUploadedByFish Lore Aquarium Fish Forum1441051964.404092.jpg


ImageUploadedByFish Lore Aquarium Fish Forum1441051996.319152.jpg


ImageUploadedByFish Lore Aquarium Fish Forum1441052011.871801.jpg


 
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nicole4434
  • #6
The 2nd photo looks to be a female, the 3rd photo could be a young male.

Overly aggressive Kribensis is usually a sign of the aquarium being too densely stocked, especially with bottom- and cave dwellers, or not being decorated in a way that forms territorial borders and plenty of hiding spots.
 
Dom90
  • #7
The one in the 2nd pic with the round purple belly is definitely a female. The one on the left in the first pic seems like a male.
 
Jamieb284
  • Thread Starter
  • #8
Maybe it is a male and female then. I have another cave arriving this week sometime to decorate my tank with and there are several plants on both sides.

I'll see what it's like after those are put in, if she is still aggressive then then I may have to look at rehoming her...


 
Dom90
  • #9
I have two kribensis in a 75g, one male and female. I asked for two females but I guess the store worker couldn't differentiate. I don't have aggression issues but my tank is moderately planted and lots of hiding spots. But my two swim together and don't bother anyone else.


 
Jamieb284
  • Thread Starter
  • #10
I have two kribensis in a 75g, one male and female. I asked for two females but I guess the store worker couldn't differentiate. I don't have aggression issues but my tank is moderately planted and lots of hiding spots. But my two swim together and don't bother anyone else.

What other fish do you have in your tank? Peaceful or aggressive?


 
Dom90
  • #11
What other fish do you have in your tank? Peaceful or aggressive?

The fish I have are in my profile. I've heard some ram cichlids can be aggressive but mine is peaceful. I also have a paradise fish in there but he's pretty mellow too.


 
ricmcc
  • #12
Heres a quote from this site

"Sexing Kribensis cichlids is not difficult, because the female fish is smaller, has a larger belly and displays brighter colours. During the breeding season her belly will get the characteristic cherry red colour. Another way of sexing Kribensis is to look at the fins; the dorsal fin of the male ends in a point.
Kribensis will form monogamous pairs and once a couple has been established you can expect them to spawn and raise young over and over again. Many aquarists provide breeding couples with their own separate tank since they tend to defend egg and fry violently."

Sexing adult Kribs, OK, with juvies not a chance. rick, but with best an all
 
AnnaOlk
  • #13
HI all!

As I have mentioned before, I’m a very beginner in aquatics...

The most trusted “teacher” was the seller at my local Pets@home store. He seemed really passionate about tropical fish.

He told me that combination 6 Rosy Tetras+Small Betta+pair of Kribensis for a 125litre / 33 gallons aquarium is fine and even said I will be able to introduce one more group of fish (like Rummynose or Neons).

My intention in keeping fish is very much fish well-being in first place.

But observing my tank I have feeling that only Kribensis are happy.
They (especially male) are chasing tetras most of the time, and nips the Betta.

2 days after I have introduced Kribensis - they spawned (Friday) but on Sunday eggs were gone. It was a week ago, so it wouldn’t be that they are preparing for spawning again?

What I should really do? Poor tetras look like they are more stressed than before Kribensis. Betta definitely needs holiday to regrow his fins...

Now, I really like our Kribs. But I’m not sure if this species is to be kept with tetras...

I’m considering reHoming some of them. But should it be Kribensis or rest of fish? Isn’t Such a big tank to small for just two fish? Will I be able to keep any other fish with Kribensis that are happy together?

Thanks for any suggestions.

Anna
 
david1978
  • #14
Check out their profile on here.
 
el337
  • #15
I've found kribs to be pretty aggressive among most dwarf cichlids. And probably more so if they are breeding. Sounds like you'll need to give them their own tank since they're stressing out your other fish.
 
sfsamm
  • #16
Yeah, betta is definitely not a good match with Kribs. Tetras maaaaaybe, I wouldn't due to the aggression when Kribs spawn.
 
Johnw220
  • #17
Hi all, I have added 2 kribs to my 130 litre tank that currently has 10 neon tetras, 2 lyretail hifin swordtails, 1 beta and 1 opeline gouram. I think both kribs are females and the larger of the 2 darts at all of the fish in the tank. At present I have 3 different caves in the tank so they have places to hide. I think that the larger female is getting ready to spawn as it looks like she is doing the belly dance. My question is would adding a Male krib calm the female down or will the aggressive behaviour calm down once she has spawned? I have added a pic of each of the kribs.

Thanks in advance

John
3ADD0C56-73C2-4B7A-8350-4E4634DEA355.jpeg
6610E809-45E9-4EC5-9C66-69953082EE99.jpeg
3ADD0C56-73C2-4B7A-8350-4E4634DEA355.jpeg
 
jake37
  • #18
I had a similar problem - i added 5 kribs (going to remove 3 tomorrow) to my 40 gallon tank. My tank has much denser set of hiding places being heavily planted and lots of caves (both wood and ceramic). These suckers killed 3 pygmy and 1 laser orange cory in the first week and tore the tail off two guppies (both guppies are now regrowing their tails). On the positive side since the first week i've noticed no more cory with missing tails (the one pygmy lost a tail but survived and the other male guppies have been untouched). Also the cory have learned to rest on the plants or with their tails against the wood. What can i say - everything i read suggested they would be passive 'cept when breeding but they are aggressive suckers.

Doesn't really help you other than confirm they are not passive fishes.

You can't see in the picture below but there is a ceramic cave to the far right just infront of the black sponge and another one left middle against the rear glass. Also there are two additional natural wood caves right middle against the rear glass in addition to the visible wood pieces front middle, right front and the long piece middle left (but the spots in the long piece are taken by some cory and clown pleco and the kribs now avoid that area).
--
Anyway the only thing i can say is after the first week they seem to calm down or at least there has been no obvious visible kills - but they still chase other fishes in the lower regions. Oddly while they did a number on the cory they do leave the 4 ottos alone.

My tank:

3.jpg
 
Johnw220
  • #19
I had a similar problem - i added 5 kribs (going to remove 3 tomorrow) to my 40 gallon tank. My tank has much denser set of hiding places being heavily planted and lots of caves (both wood and ceramic). These suckers killed 3 pygmy and 1 laser orange cory in the first week and tore the tail off two guppies (both guppies are now regrowing their tails). On the positive side since the first week i've noticed no more cory with missing tails (the one pygmy lost a tail but survived and the other male guppies have been untouched). Also the cory have learned to rest on the plants or with their tails against the wood. What can i say - everything i read suggested they would be passive 'cept when breeding but they are aggressive suckers.

Doesn't really help you other than confirm they are not passive fishes.

You can't see in the picture below but there is a ceramic cave to the far right just infront of the black sponge and another one left middle against the rear glass. Also there are two additional natural wood caves right middle against the rear glass in addition to the visible wood pieces front middle, right front and the long piece middle left (but the spots in the long piece are taken by some cory and clown pleco and the kribs now avoid that area).
--
Anyway the only thing i can say is after the first week they seem to calm down or at least there has been no obvious visible kills - but they still chase other fishes in the lower regions. Oddly while they did a number on the cory they do leave the 4 ottos alone.

My tank:
View attachment 706440
Thanks for the reply, your tank looks really good I got the kribs for the same reason, everything I read said they were good community fish. the smaller one is fine but the bigger more colourful one is the devil fish
 
jkkgron2
  • #20
Thanks for the reply, your tank looks really good I got the kribs for the same reason, everything I read said they were good community fish. the smaller one is fine but the bigger more colourful one is the devil fish
Female kribs will fight too the death. Adding a male will do pretty much nothing except increase the aggression. They are great community fish when they are kept without others of their species but if females are kept with females then they will become super aggressive and will NOT stop until one is hurt or dead. I had to separate mine due to this issue too. A large group of males can ( but not always) work but females do not work out with other females. I would separate them before any major damage is done. IME when a female is full of eggs they do become aggressive but I’m guessing she is being extremely aggressive because of the competition from the other krib.
 
jake37
  • #21
That might be true long term but at least when i watch the fishes it is always the one colourful male chasing everyone (including the colourful female). To date none of the other kribs chase each other or the other fishes. Naturally this during the day when the lights are on - i have no clue who is doing what at night.
-
I have 2 confirmed females and 2 confirmed male. The third i think is a female but is young enough i haven't confirmed it yet. The second male is showing a little colour and normally 'bows' when the alpha male shows up but he still get chased along with all three females by the alpha male. This male also chases everything else in the tank - though he has started leaving the cory alone and he has always ignored the ottos.

Female kribs will fight too the death. Adding a male will do pretty much nothing except increase the aggression. They are great community fish when they are kept without others of their species but if females are kept with females then they will become super aggressive and will NOT stop until one is hurt or dead. I had to separate mine due to this issue too. A large group of males can ( but not always) work but females do not work out with other females. I would separate them before any major damage is done. IME when a female is full of eggs they do become aggressive but I’m guessing she is being extremely aggressive because of the competition from the other krib.
 
jkkgron2
  • #22
That might be true long term but at least when i watch the fishes it is always the one colourful male chasing everyone (including the colourful female). To date none of the other kribs chase each other or the other fishes. Naturally this during the day when the lights are on - i have no clue who is doing what at night.
-
I have 2 confirmed females and 2 confirmed male. The third i think is a female but is young enough i haven't confirmed it yet. The second male is showing a little colour and normally 'bows' when the alpha male shows up but he still get chased along with all three females by the alpha male. This male also chases everything else in the tank - though he has started leaving the cory alone and he has always ignored the ottos.
Sometimes in large groups like that it is the male who is the aggressor, the larger male may be trying to mate or pair up with a female who is not interested in him, that could explain some of the chasing behavior. Tbh I’m a bit surprised that it’s the male who does all the chasing. He may just be and aggressive individual

Normally but not always it’s the female who is dominant. I’m guessing the reason they aren’t fighting is because they are too stressed out by the male. Since the male is attacking all the fish I’m guessing he’s just a mean individual. From what I’ve learned (and experience) it’s best to keep 3-5 males and one female to reduce fighting.

I did almost the same thing as the OP once where I had one male and two females. They wouldn’t stop fighting, no matter what. I was terrified they were going to kill each other. Also, your tank is pretty heavily planted and also pretty long, which may make it possible for the, to live with minimal fighting. Especially because they’re are two males so they don’t feel the need to fight over a mate.
 
jake37
  • #23
Hum. Maybe i should get rid of the aggressive male and keep the passive male and 2 non coloured females? You think the passive male will stay passive when the aggressor is removed ?
 
jkkgron2
  • #24
Hum. Maybe i should get rid of the aggressive male and keep the passive male and 2 non coloured females? You think the passive male will stay passive when the aggressor is removed ?
Probably? There will always be a top fish in the tank but I don’t think he will start attacking all the fish like the other male. When you do that make sure to monitor the females to make sure one doesn’t start becoming a bully to the others. Has the passive male been in there since he was a juvenile? The longer he’s been in there without attacking any fish the more likely he won’t when the other male leaves.
 
jake37
  • #25
All 5 were purchased at the same time approx 4 weeks ago. At the time neither males had much colour but they were close to adult age. About 14 days ago one of the males coloured up quite a bit but the second male dropped all pretense of colour (I think this is normal). Also i reread the above - what I meant was keep the passive male and colourful female - remove the two non-coloured female and aggressive male.
---
When i say remove i might just put them in the 120 or give them to lfs a bit undecided.

Sorry for the sidetrack Johnw220

Probably? There will always be a top fish in the tank but I don’t think he will start attacking all the fish like the other male. When you do that make sure to monitor the females to make sure one doesn’t start becoming a bully to the others. Has the passive male been in there since he was a juvenile? The longer he’s been in there without attacking any fish the more likely he won’t when the other male leaves.
 
jkkgron2
  • #26
All 5 were purchased at the same time approx 4 weeks ago. At the time neither males had much colour but they were close to adult age. About 14 days ago one of the males coloured up quite a bit but the second male dropped all pretense of colour (I think this is normal). Also i reread the above - what I meant was keep the passive male and colourful female - remove the two non-coloured female and aggressive male.
---
When i say remove i might just put them in the 120 or give them to lfs a bit undecided.

Sorry for the sidetrack Johnw220
Oh, that makes a ton more sense! That sounds like a great plan, just be aware that they may pair up and start breeding. In that tank since it’s so heavily planted with lots of hiding places I don’t think that should be an issue aggression wise. They may not even pair up. If the aggressive male goes in a 120 gallon I doubt he will feel the need to bully other fish, and if he does there is room to run away.
 
Johnw220
  • #27
Female kribs will fight too the death. Adding a male will do pretty much nothing except increase the aggression. They are great community fish when they are kept without others of their species but if females are kept with females then they will become super aggressive and will NOT stop until one is hurt or dead. I had to separate mine due to this issue too. A large group of males can ( but not always) work but females do not work out with other females. I would separate them before any major damage is done. IME when a female is full of eggs they do become aggressive but I’m guessing she is being extremely aggressive because of the competition from the other krib.
Thanks for the advice,
All 5 were purchased at the same time approx 4 weeks ago. At the time neither males had much colour but they were close to adult age. About 14 days ago one of the males coloured up quite a bit but the second male dropped all pretense of colour (I think this is normal). Also i reread the above - what I meant was keep the passive male and colourful female - remove the two non-coloured female and aggressive male.
---
When i say remove i might just put them in the 120 or give them to lfs a bit undecided.

Sorry for the sidetrack Johnw220
No problem . I moved the smaller krib into my daughters tank and moved all the tank decor round. Hopefully they will calm down now
 
chromedome52
  • #28
OP's fish are a pair, problem is that the male is smaller than the female. They don't like small males. Get some size on him, or get a bigger male.
 
jake37
  • #29
OP said it was a pair of females and in the picture they both look female to me - how about you ?

Having said that I recall that someone told me (don't know if it is true) that two mature females will hate each other and the stronger one will kill the weaker one. In my tank i've not seen the three females fighting (yet).

OP's fish are a pair, problem is that the male is smaller than the female. They don't like small males. Get some size on him, or get a bigger male.
 
chromedome52
  • #30
From the photo, I see the ventral(pelvic) fins are pointed. It's kind of a small image, I could be mistaken, but that's what I see. That is characteristic of a male. It is the very characteristic that the genus was named for (females have rounded pelvic fins). I know from experience, both mine and others, that females want males who are bigger than them. They will treat a small male as if it were another female.
 
yukondog
  • #31
When breeding kribs I will never put a smaller male with the female it always work out bad for the male.
 
bearbare666
  • #32
Hi all, I have added 2 kribs to my 130 litre tank that currently has 10 neon tetras, 2 lyretail hifin swordtails, 1 beta and 1 opeline gouram. I think both kribs are females and the larger of the 2 darts at all of the fish in the tank. At present I have 3 different caves in the tank so they have places to hide. I think that the larger female is getting ready to spawn as it looks like she is doing the belly dance. My question is would adding a Male krib calm the female down or will the aggressive behaviour calm down once she has spawned? I have added a pic of each of the kribs.

Thanks in advance

JohnView attachment 706438View attachment 706439View attachment 706438
did you say you had a betta in this tank? male or female? does the female krib fight with it?
 

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