Advice on the high nitrite?

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Jbuds

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I believe my tank making progress. Amonia is staying at zero. The nitrites are staying very high now. I am changing water daily to dilute it as best i can and i am treating with prime and very very small amount of salt. Is there anything else i can do? I imagine i have to wait it out until the nitrite consuming bacteria multiplies. I am afraid of changing too much water in one day but these nitrites are making me very nervous. I do have some nitrate showing so i do have some of the bacteria for sure. The stress is causing other problems in my fish. I also suspect internal parasites. Bloating, white poop on one fish. Just noticed this morning that a second zebra is looking a little pineconed. I do have some api general cure but i am hesitant to treat anything because i am so new to this.

Advice on the high nitrite? Should i treat the suspected parasites with the general cure?

(Mystery snail is behaving weird as of this morning as well. I suspect he is either dead or sick. He hasnt moved since this morning.

Im really confused by all this. I test with my api master kit daily. I feel i am doing everything a responsible person should do. I hope it is just a water quality issue that the cycle will clear up.

I forgot to mention i had one danio pass that was really really skinny. (Wasting disease?) Basically i have a lot of symptoms on top of my water quality issue.

I would appreciate any guidance. I dont want to lose any more animals. Thanks

Update snail is out and moving around again thankfully. Still need guidance. Nitrite is off the charts and daily water changes aren't helping much.

I was so relieved to see this! I thought my mistakes killed this poor little space alien.
 

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Mazeus

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Bigger daily water changes +Prime is really all you can do. How much water are you changing each day?
 
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mattgirl

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This may put your mind to rest about the nitrites. I was out of the hobby for a few years. When I started my tank back up I had to cycle it all over again. I did a fish in cycle just as I have always done. When the nitrites spiked they spiked up off the chart. I handled it by changing out 50% of the water every day. Testing didn't show them dropping but after the 5th straight day of big water changes the nitrites dropped to zero. That is often what happens with this bacteria. One day high and the next day zero.

Daily water changes are the best thing you can do to protect your fish and snail during this cycling process. As long as you add your water conditioner to temp matched water before pouring it in there it isn't going to hurt your cycle or your water pets.
 
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Jbuds

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I have been changing water daily but only 20 to 30 percent. I was afraid to change too much at once and shock them. My partner learned the hard way when she did a 50 percent change and also thought cleaning the filter and substrate is what a good pet owner should do. So now i am kind of afraid to do large changes. Even in this emergency situation. Is it bad if i do 2 20 to 30 percent changes a day? I do not want to over correct. It just kills me to know how stressed these fish might be.

So just to reiterate? Is it ok to do multiple 20 to 30 percent changes a day? I have also stopped feeding since yesterday. I have vacuumed all gravel as well but i was careful not to harm any bacteria there. Pleco man is a lot lol.

I hope you guys are right. I would love to wake up soon and have 0 nitrites! And i know im anxious and overthinking but truly believe a couple of these fish atleast are also suffering from parasites. I guess we deal with that once the water is fixed.

Thank you everyone for trying to help my fish and i.
 
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Mazeus

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I know it can be nerve-racking when you are first getting started, but big water changes should be fine (if you are careful to add water that matches the tank temperature). I did an 80% change today in my 55g because I wanted to change some of the hardscape. Didn't harm the fish at all, although my clown pleco was quite displeased that I moved his favourite rocks!
 
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mattgirl

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I have to think it was something other than just a large water change that caused your partners problems. As long as the new water is the same temp and water conditioner has been added to it before putting it in the tank, big water changes should not hurt your fish or the cycling process.

To be perfectly honest I would think doing multiple smaller water changes instead of just one bigger one each day would cause more stress. I know how nerve wracking this can be when we are new to the hobby. We are going to make mistakes but big water changes while nitrites are high can only help protect your fish.

Do the water change. Don't test again for 24 hours. If the nitrites are still the same levle as it was the previous day do another water change. Do this daily until you run the test 24 hours after the last water change and you see 0 nitrites. If during this time the nitrites drop down low enough to where the total amount of nitrites plus ammonia is less than one you can skip the water change that day and just add Prime that day.
 
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Cinnabar

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Jbuds said:
I have been changing water daily but only 20 to 30 percent. I was afraid to change too much at once and shock them. My partner learned the hard way when she did a 50 percent change and also thought cleaning the filter and substrate is what a good pet owner should do. So now i am kind of afraid to do large changes. Even in this emergency situation. Is it bad if i do 2 20 to 30 percent changes a day? I do not want to over correct. It just kills me to know how stressed these fish might be.

So just to reiterate? Is it ok to do multiple 20 to 30 percent changes a day? I have also stopped feeding since yesterday. I have vacuumed all gravel as well but i was careful not to harm any bacteria there. Pleco man is a lot lol.

I hope you guys are right. I would love to wake up soon and have 0 nitrites! And i know im anxious and overthinking but truly believe a couple of these fish atleast are also suffering from parasites. I guess we deal with that once the water is fixed.

Thank you everyone for trying to help my fish and i.
Its totally ok to do big changes as long as the water source and the water in your tank are similar enough (pH, temperature, hardness, that kind of thing). Also when I'm doing big water changes, about 80 percent, I don't vacuum the gravel or touch the filter media. If I know I want to do a deep gravel vac, I usually change closer to 20 percent.
 
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Jbuds

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Mazeus said:
I know it can be nerve-racking when you are first getting started, but big water changes should be fine (if you are careful to add water that matches the tank temperature). I did an 80% change today in my 55g because I wanted to change some of the hardscape. Didn't harm the fish at all, although my clown pleco was quite displeased that I moved his favourite rocks!
Thanks for your input. I will do 50 percent tonight. Fingers crossed that can dilute this a little.
mattgirl said:
I have to think it was something other than just a large water change that caused your partners problems. As long as the new water is the same temp and water conditioner has been added to it before putting it in the tank, big water changes should not hurt your fish or the cycling process.

To be perfectly honest I would think doing multiple smaller water changes instead of just one bigger one each day would cause more stress. I know how nerve wracking this can be when we are new to the hobby. We are going to make mistakes but big water changes while nitrites are high can only help protect your fish.

Do the water change. Don't test again for 24 hours. If the nitrites are still the same levle as it was the previous day do another water change. Do this daily until you run the test 24 hours after the last water change and you see 0 nitrites. If during this time the nitrites drop down low enough to where the total amount of nitrites plus ammonia is less than one you can skip the water change that day and just add Prime that day.
Yes. Unfortunately, she didnt realize she was killing the beneficial bacteria by cleaning the filter and substrate. When we woke up the next morning her fish was gasping at the surface. If i had to guess, it must have been ammonia. She felt so bad. 30 years of life experience told her that pets like clean enviroments.
 
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Mazeus

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Jbuds said:
Yes. Unfortunately, she didnt realize she was killing the beneficial bacteria by cleaning the filter and substrate. When we woke up the next morning her fish was gasping at the surface. If i had to guess, it must have been ammonia. She felt so bad. 30 years of life experience told her that pets like clean enviroments.
It's such an easy mistake to make. Logic would tell you to clean the filter wouldn't it? And there is no issue with giving it a slight clean (to get mulme off) but always using declorinated water. Good luck!
 
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mattgirl

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Jbuds said:
Thanks for your input. I will do 50 percent tonight. Fingers crossed that can dilute this a little.

Yes. Unfortunately, she didnt realize she was killing the beneficial bacteria by cleaning the filter and substrate. When we woke up the next morning her fish was gasping at the surface. If i had to guess, it must have been ammonia. She felt so bad. 30 years of life experience told her that pets like clean enviroments.
Our tanks are the one thing in our homes we don't want to keep spotlessly clean. We can keep them looking clean without deep cleaning them to the point of removing all that good bacteria. The most important thing is keeping the water fresh and clean.

Sometimes lessons have to be learned the hard way. Often our fish pay the price but after we get over beating ourselves up we realize we are human and mistakes happen. We will be sure not to make that mistake again. Others, maybe, but not that one.
 
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