Help Adopted Betta Health Questions

Eric S.

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Hello everyone,

I recently adopted a betta fish from a friend of a friend. She was originally planning on letting it die and had stopped feeding it and cleaning its tank. Luckily it is safe with me now, but I have a couple of questions that I figured you all might be able to help with since the original owner was not much help.

1. The betta was listed as a delta tail, which generally have larger tails though this one's looks small and injured. Maybe it isn't but I want to know what you guys think on how long it may take to heal.

Here is an image for reference. I have attached it too.

2. The size of the betta is abnormally large. I know there can be larger bettas sold but compared to the other betta tanks I have this one is twice-if not more-the size of the others. Could this be due to overfeeding or is it just the breed?

3. I don't have any other health concerns as I haven't noticed anything out of the ordinary, but is there anything I should look out for?

Thanks and I just joined these forums so I look forward to getting to use them and know some of you.

Eric S.
 

PeteStevers

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I'll let our Betta experts chime in. Just wanted to say thank you on behalf of your Betta! WTG!
 

KinsKicks

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Hello!

Congrats on saving the cutie! As for your questions

1) the tail had definitely rotted down; judging by the spread of thetail and the length of the other fins, it should be much bigger. However, concerning its previous care, the rotting of the tail is no surprises. Lots of water changes and good nutrition will help bring it back a little.

2) perhaps a king Betta breed; those guys can’t get quite large and make regular Bettas look teeny!

3) unless you notice any sort of weird symptoms occurring, you seem to be only facing the consequences of poor conditions from the previous owner. A nutritious diet and clean water will bring him back in no time

Edit; as an afterthought; is that white spot on his head seem fuzzy at all? Or simply looked like a scraped spot?
 

Rtessy

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I agree, it looks like it still has some severe finrot since the tail is lined, but luckily it's not life threatening and is relatively easy to fix.
What kind of test kit do you use for the water?
 
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Eric S.

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the tail had definitely rotted down; judging by the spread of thetail and the length of the other fins, it should be much bigger.
Gotcha, I'll keep feeding him a healthy diet and might use some light medication for him.

perhaps a king Betta breed
I had considered that, could have been put in the wrong container or something.

Edit; as an afterthought; is that white spot on his head seem fuzzy at all? Or simply looked like a scraped spot?
That's just a little bit of dried water on the outside of the tank, sorry the picture was not the best.

Thanks again for your help, I'll be sure to keep a watchful eye over this guy and monitor his fins, size, etc to see if there are any noticeable changes.
 

KinsKicks

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Gotcha, I'll keep feeding him a healthy diet and might use some light medication for him.


I had considered that, could have been put in the wrong container or something.


That's just a little bit of dried water on the outside of the tank, sorry the picture was not the best.

Thanks again for your help, I'll be sure to keep a watchful eye over this guy and monitor his fins, size, etc to see if there are any noticeable changes.
I see the spot on the container *facepalm*. Also! I wanted to add that finnage usually grow back clear initially; don’t panic. It can sometimes be a bit thinner, but eventually the tissue will thicken and the pigmentation often catches up later. Therefore, if you see new clear finnage tissue growing back, he’s doing well
 

Rtessy

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I have a some "tetra" brand test strips. All the parameters seem fine, buying a heater sometime soon, even though the temp is within the green too. Should I potentially upgrade to a better test kit?
Do those strips test for ammonia? Do you know the current temperature? And what are all the current readings?
Sorry to bombard you with questions, I just want a basic starting point to help you with
No rush to get things perfect if the water is bad, it's better to take things slow with this type of situation. It does look to have a face much more like a king betta (cross of two betta species) than the average splendens.
 

KinsKicks

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I have a some "tetra" brand test strips. All the parameters seem fine, buying a heater sometime soon, even though the temp is within the green too. Should I potentially upgrade to a better test kit?
The API master test kits are generally a bit more reliable on the long run. The test strips are nice on a budget and short on time, but general exposure to oxygen from opening and closing (sometimes forgetting to close it haha) can affect the accuracy of the strips and/or the ability of the chemicals in the strips to react properly. They also don’t test for ammonia generally

And tip with the heater, I suggest an adjustable one; for a healing fish focusing on growth, bumping the temp slightly up to 80 degrees is helpful. It’s also useful when you live in places that fluctuate in temps during the year!
 
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Eric S.

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Do those strips test for ammonia? Do you know the current temperature? And what are all the current readings?
I'm not sure if they do test for ammonia but I'm leaning towards that they don't.
The temp, last I checked, was around 76 degrees.
I don't have the current readings, but they were considered "Safe" on all the different tests. I won't be able to test again until later today as I am currently typing this from uni.
And no worries, I want whats best for all my fish and if I'm doing something wrong I want to know haha.
 
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Eric S.

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The API master test kits are generally a bit more reliable on the long run. The test strips are nice on a budget and short on time, but general exposure to oxygen from opening and closing (sometimes forgetting to close it haha) can affect the accuracy of the strips and/or the ability of the chemicals in the strips to react properly. They also don’t test for ammonia generally

And tip with the heater, I suggest an adjustable one; for a healing fish focusing on growth, bumping the temp slightly up to 80 degrees is helpful. It’s also useful when you live in places that fluctuate in temps during the year!
Thanks! I'll look into purchasing some a better testing kit and variable heater.
 

Repolie

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1- Looks like he was a delta tail, but fin rot ate away at it.

2- Some bettas can be larger than others with genetics and diet. Can you get some above pictures of him?

3- He definitely has fin rot so continue to keep the water clean to prevent other infections from setting in with daily partial water changes. Optional additives such as Indian Almond Leaves or Stressguard have therapeutic and antiseptic purposes which promote the healing process. Bettas can also be large if they have dropsy which causes them to retain fluids, want to see a picture of above him.
 
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Eric S.

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1- Looks like he was a delta tail, but fin rot ate away at it.

2- Some bettas can be larger than others with genetics and diet. Can you get some above pictures of him?

3- He definitely has fin rot so continue to keep the water clean to prevent other infections from setting in with daily partial water changes. Optional additives such as Indian Almond Leaves or Stressguard have therapeutic and antiseptic purposes which promote the healing process. Bettas can also be large if they have dropsy which causes them to retain fluids, want to see a picture of above him.
I can't get a picture of him right now but I'll send another reply when I do. I wouldn't rule out dropsy, but I don't believe he has it. I'll also be sure to look into almond leaves, etc. Thanks.
 
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Eric S.

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want to see a picture of above him.
Never replied, but here he is now. He looks amazing and it doing quite well. His fins still have a bit more growing to do but it is obvious he is a delta tail now. Thanks.
 
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