Adf Sponge Filter

babiimoore
  • #1
so I bought a sponge filter, I didnt realize how big it was going to be and it takes up like 1/3 of my 5 gallon, but whatever. now that I have this hooked up I shouldnt have to really worry about toxins and such as long as I do biweekly water changes, right? I just don't see how this would work as well as the filter I have for my fish in my 10 gallon. just a little worried about my frogs.
 

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DuaneV
  • #2
What a lot of people new to the hobby don't realize is, filters aren't to suck out the "", theyre a place for beneficial bacteria to grow and live which will "clean" the water of toxins. First a type of bacteria grows that eats ammonia and produces nitrites, then another form grows that eats nitrites and produces nitrates. Once your tank has "cycled" (which means your filter has the proper amount of BB to convert all waste to nitrates) you will still need to do water changes to remove waste and lower your nitrates.

A sponge filter is a GREAT filter as it has a TON of surface that the BB can grow and thrive on. In addition a filter WILL remove SOME waste (but only if the waste is small enough to be sucked up) but its not really its main job (unless we're talking about powerful filters that move a ton of water).

So, you WILL still need to worry about toxins UNTIL the filter has cycled. Check your parameters daily, every other day, etc., and you'll see ammonia levels going down, nitrites going up, then nitrites going down and nitrates going up. Once you have 0 ammonia, 0 nitrites and lowish nitrates, you will need to do regular water changes. Once you're cycled water changes will still have to be done, but it will depend on your bioload. I have some tanks I change 50% weekly, some I change 20% monthly. It all depends.
 
babiimoore
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
how often should I do water changes while the filter cycles?

also, is the positioning of the filter right? the tube reaches very slightly below the surface and shoots out bubbles. is this how it should work? my dudes can't handle much current.
 
DuaneV
  • #4
The amount of water changes depends 100% on your tank. You NEED to know what you're parameters are at and do changes based on those. If you have almost no bioload, less frequent changes. If you have a bigger bioload, more frequent changes. If you don't have an API Master Test Kit to monitor your ammonia, nitrites and nitrates, get one now and start using it.

The tube that the bubbles are coming out of should be below the water. It will create a better back pressure, draw more water through the sponge and help with surface agitation.
 
babiimoore
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
well ive spent about $200 already. ill have to wait a little to get test strips. would it be bad to just keep it safe and do water changes often? and ****, the filters just too big for the tank then, I won't be able to put it any further under the water. will it still function alright how I have it?
 
Mazeus
  • #6
Without a test kit, in an uncycled tank I'd do daily water changes to keep the water clean until you can afford a kit.
 
bitseriously
  • #7
1. For best function, and to help manage circulation in the tank, the uplift tube should always be below the waterline. You can use a hacksaw to cut some length off if u need, just be sure to sand down the rough cut end, and then seat that end into the sponge, so the as-new end is the one in the water column.
2. You should add two pieces of hardware: first is a check valve, second is a ball valve. Both get installed in the airline between the pump and tank (i.e. you need to cut the airline in two separate locations – they can be close to each other – and add each of these devices in the cut sections). Working backwards from the tank you should have the check valve first, then the ball valve. If you can get a stainless steel 2-port gang valve, that would be ideal. Obviously, you’d only need one of the outlets. The ball valve or gang valve would allow you to choke the amount of airflow. Your filter will still work, but the rate of airflow, and hence the action of the water, can be tailored to your needs. If you’re on a really tight budget, you can also just bend back the air line and use a clothespin, spring clip or zip tie to achieve the same result.
 
Lucy
  • #8
Welcome to FishLore!
It might take up a lot of room but if your frogs are like mine they like to sit up top and also use it as a hiding spot. They squish underneath and between the wall and the sponge so it's all good.
 
DuaneV
  • #9
I wouldnt get test strips, theyve been known to be inaccurate. Get the liquid kit I mentioned. Its like $20 bucks and you'll KNOW if your water is okay or not. You can lose more than that in livestock if you don't know what the parameters are. Water changes won't help if your water has ammonia or nitrates in it.

The filter will work much better with the tube below the waterline. Just cut it an inch shorter.
 

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