Add warm or cold water?

moogie25

Member
when adding new tap water, do you use cold or warm? does it matter?

reason why i asked because it takes hours to warm up to the same tank temp. so to speed thing up, is it OK if i use warm/cool water instead?

i read warm/hot water contain contaminants and maybe unsafe?

thx
 

grac3

Member
just use normal room temp water, do smaller changes more often if you find it takes a while to reach the same temp again
 

TClare

Member
I mix hot and cold from the taps to get approximately the right temperature. But many years ago when I used to keep fish in the UK, I never used water from the hot tap, I think we were told that the hot pipes were copper or something, but if the hot and cold pipes are the same type I don't think it makes any difference.
 

ValkyrieLips

Member
As long as you're adding a water conditioner, any containments in the water should be neutralized. I temp match WC water as closely as I can to the exact temperature of the tank and I'm usually only off by a degree, max 2. You can mix hot and cold water to get to the desired temperature.
 

Kymopoleia

Member
I use room temp and I never had a heater. But today I’m getting one for the first time so I’m pretty excited.
 

Dennis57

Member
I always match the same temp. within a degree or 2.
 

RayClem

Member
I try to keep all my tanks at 77 degrees F +/- 1 degree. I keep a 32 gallon heavy-duty trash can in the basement in which I store water for water changes. It has a heater that keeps it at 77 degrees as well.

I doubt that adding water that is slightly warmer or cooler is going to hurt, but I would never want to do a large water change using water than was significantly cooler than the tank. However, I will add small amount of room temperature water to replace evaporation that might be 8 degrees cooler than my tank, but I am talking about 2% of the water volume or less, not water changes that require a larger volume.

The reason use of hot water is not normally advised is that hot water heaters contain a sacrificial anode normally made of aluminum, magnesium or zinc/aluminum alloy to minimize corrosion of other parts of the system. The "sacrificial" part means that the anode slowly dissolves in the hot water requiring replacement every few years.
 
  • Thread Starter

moogie25

Member
thanks, guys for the feedbacks...
 

ForceTen

Member
I use warm water in the winter. I mean I try to get the tap water close to the tank temp. No measuring. I can feel if its close. And thats what goes in.
 

Shambhalaubie

Member
I always try to replace my water at about the same temperature as my aquarium is currently. I usually judge with my hand, slightly warm but not too warm, I mix some cool water in as well, to try and mimic the temperature of the aquarium as much as possible. You never want to drastically change the temperature of the water, whether that's hot or cold. It can harm your fish and other inhabitants, gradually increase or decrease the temperature is my rule of thumb.
 

Latest threads

Top Bottom