75 Gallon Tank "Add and Wait" Method

chrisw1639

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ok this what going on, started live fish cycle about 7 weeks ago and all the fish went bye bye. will never ask local fish store that ? again.so when the last fish passed. I read about the"Add and Wait" Method so started that took ammonia up to 8ppm and took a week to drop to 0 then started takeing it up to 4ppm it would take a day or so to drop 0 now its been two weeks and 4ppm drops to 0 in 12-14 hr. but still no nitrites but nitrates are off the chart. so my ? is do I keep going with the ammonia at 4ppm and waite for nitrites or big water change and call it cycled
 

blkdeath75

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First off I wouldn't cycle ever with live fish. It takes a bit longer to do it empty but it won't kill anything either . I'm not sure about the add and wait method? I know in an established aquarium your ammonia and nitrite should be extremely low if not zero and nitrates no higher than 20ish(lower after water changes). Your Ph looks pretty high also in your AQ info, is it like that from the tap?

7 weeks though with water changes should give you solid numbers. If not I think you may have a filter or filter media issue? There are no fish in here anymore correct?
 
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chrisw1639

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no fish/ the numbers you looked at are old. I had to switch to ro water to get nitrates down . and I think I stall cycle. so then I went to "Add and Wait" Method
ammonia is droping to 0 in 12-14 hr. from 4ppm nitrites are 0 and nitrates are off the charts. but I new that would happen! but I never saw a nitrite change ??
 

blkdeath75

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I'm confused I guess. I thought ammonia and nitrite was something that was produced by fish waste/beneficial bacteria in an aquarium with fish and eventually the bacteria converts everything to nitrate which you lower with regular water changes(right?). You're saying you are getting ammonia and extremely high nitrates in an unpopulated tank with zero nitrite AND you are doing water changes regularly?
 

claudicles

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You may have missed the nitrite spike. It can be brief. So if you have nitrates your tank is cycled. Time for a big water change them some new fish! Congrats.
 

Aquarist

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Good morning,

As Claudicles has mentioned, the nitrites can come and go quickly and you may have missed it. It does sound like your tank will be cycled with a good water change to bring down the nitrates.

Have you tested your water right from the tap to see if it contains any nitrates?

Ken
 

jdhef

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I agree, It sounds like you are cycled. Since you started out cycling with fish, you may have had some nitrite converting bacteria forming prior to going fishless. That could be why you didn't see a nitrite spike.

So in that case...Congratulations!
 

flyin-lowe

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I'm confused I guess. I thought ammonia and nitrite was something that was produced by fish waste/beneficial bacteria in an aquarium with fish and eventually the bacteria converts everything to nitrate which you lower with regular water changes(right?). You're saying you are getting ammonia and extremely high nitrates in an unpopulated tank with zero nitrite AND you are doing water changes regularly?
One method of cycling a tank is to add pure ammonia (10 % solution) to the tank which simulates fish waste. This will begin to grow the bacteria that you know about. The bacteria will then turn the ammonia into nitrites and then to nitrates. After this happens it is safe to put fish in the tank.
 

*Hannah*

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Correct me if I am wrong. I think you have to keep adding a ammonia source, until you add your fish or you loose you cycle.
 

Prince Powder

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You are correct Hannah. Without a consistent ammonia source the bacteria will not survive.

chris- It also sounds to me like you are cycled. Congratulations! I would do a large water change to lower the nitrates as the others have suggested. If you do not plan on getting fish within the 24 hours after the water change then I would suggest you continue to feed your tank with ammonia to keep your bacteria well fed and going strong. Then just before you go to pick up your fish, do another water change to lower the nitrates some more, especially if they are very high. Have you decided on stock yet?
 
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chrisw1639

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yes did 50 % WATER CHANGE today and nitrate are still off the charts, so t'll do another 50% in the morning and check. not sure if I'll get true reading because of useing prime !! but will keep adding ammonis at lower levels like 2ppm.
 
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chrisw1639

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as for stock it's rea;y not up to me LOL, this tank belongs to the wife. She left the cycle part up tp me,she wants 2 tiger ocars so thats what it will be im but in a year this tank will be mine, because the tigers must get a bigger tank like 200 gl.and since I will have a cycled tank it will cut my time down a lot on the next cycle. because I will get filter moth ahead of time and run it off this tank. then I will take over the 75 gl. tank.
 
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