AcornTheBetta's 29g build! - Page 2

  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Is this just normal melt and algae?

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86 ssinit
Member
What ferts are you giving the plants. The Java fern looks like algae or diatoms on it and may just need to be rinsed off. The hole in the sword could be many things. Even a fish eating it. For your sword put a root tab under it. They do eat through there root system.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
86 ssinit said:
What ferts are you giving the plants. The Java fern looks like algae or diatoms on it and may just need to be rinsed off. The hole in the sword could be many things. Even a fish eating it. For your sword put a root tab under it. They do eat through there root system.
I am giving aquarium co op ez green. Their currently aren't any fish in there. It's a dirted tank and there is a root tab right under where it is so I think the sword has enough. I was going to wash the jern of and do a water change today. We'll see how that goes.

86 ssinit could those have been caused by too much oxygen in the water?
EDIT: I was running an air pump in the tank so that there was surface agitation while I was on vacation and waiting for my filter.
 
DarkOne
Member
Isn't this a dirted tank?

Most new plants need time to adjust to a new tank and can "melt" in the process before growing new, healthy leaves. With a dirted tank, you don't need to add any ferts at all. The dirt is nutrient rich and can support the plants for 3-5 yrs.

New tanks can also have brown diatom (algae) until it balances.

You don't have to cut the sponge. The mulm (brown stuff) in the sponge should have some BB so just squeezing it into the new tank will seed with some BB. It doesn't look great with the brown cloudy water but it should clear or settle in a few hours to a day. I would start with the WCMM first and the panda cories last (they're the most sensitive to a new tank). I would say wait at least 6-8 weeks before adding panda cories.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
DarkOne said:
Isn't this a dirted tank?

Most new plants need time to adjust to a new tank and can "melt" in the process before growing new, healthy leaves. With a dirted tank, you don't need to add any ferts at all. The dirt is nutrient rich and can support the plants for 3-5 yrs.

New tanks can also have brown diatom (algae) until it balances.

You don't have to cut the sponge. The mulm (brown stuff) in the sponge should have some BB so just squeezing it into the new tank will seed with some BB. It doesn't look great with the brown cloudy water but it should clear or settle in a few hours to a day. I would start with the WCMM first and the panda cories last (they're the most sensitive to a new tank). I would say wait at least 6-8 weeks before adding panda cories.
Would that timeline be the same with bronze corys?
It's a dirted tank. Shouldn't I add ferts for moss cuz they feed from the water column?
 
DarkOne
Member
AcornTheBetta said:
Would that timeline be the same with bronze corys?
It's a dirted tank. Shouldn't I add ferts for moss cuz they feed from the water column?
Bronze cories (Aeneus) are a little more hardy but they're also bigger than Pandas. I think you'd be fine with either but I would still wait to add any corydoras.

I would lay off the ferts for the first few months at least. There should be more than enough nutrients in the water column for moss.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
DarkOne said:
Bronze cories (Aeneus) are a little more hardy but they're also bigger than Pandas. I think you'd be fine with either but I would still wait to add any corydoras.

I would lay off the ferts for the first few months at least. There should be more than enough nutrients in the water column for moss.
Should I cut the dead/melting leaves?
 
86 ssinit
Member
Yeah if there dead cut them off. They won’t come back. On my iPad now and I can see the fern has melted leaves and the sword has like a hair algae growing on it. I would either tank it out and rinse it off or because that will probably make a mess with the dirt. Add another filter with just filter floss and wipe the leaves clean in the tank with your hands.
I’ve had great luck with bronze Cory’s. Mine have been good to go when the tanks were ready. Shame your on the west coast. DarkOne has some great strebai Cory’s.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
86 ssinit said:
Yeah if there dead cut them off. They won’t come back. On my iPad now and I can see the fern has melted leaves and the sword has like a hair algae growing on it. I would either tank it out and rinse it off or because that will probably make a mess with the dirt. Add another filter with just filter floss and wipe the leaves clean in the tank with your hands.
I’ve had great luck with bronze Cory’s. Mine have been good to go when the tanks were ready. Shame your on the west coast. DarkOne has some great strebai Cory’s.
Yeah. I was just going to rub the algae off and then let my Fluval 207 take care of it.

Updates:
  1. There is a lot of melt and algae
    20201015_204935.jpg
  2. My tank is super dirty
    20201015_204920.jpg
  3. I installed my Fluval 207 today
    1. I modded this filter so that the layers of the media bins go (from bottom to top): Course sponge + quick clear pad, Marineland filter floss + Biomax, Lava Rock
Questions:
  1. 86 ssinit what should I do about the plant with the hole in it?
  2. Should I trim all my plants to encourage new plant growth?
  3. Should I revise my lighting schedule (currently 4 on, 4 off, 4 on)?
Thanks!
 
86 ssinit
Member
I wouldn’t worry about the hole. I hate to take off leaves on swords till they start growing good. Than I will take off the outside leaves as they start dying.
I like your lighting schedule. It keeps algae from growing like crazy. Are you using or plan to use co2. I don’t use it but do use the api co2 booster. It’s more of an algeside than co2 but it does help. Just has to be used daily.
05AD30CD-E65D-48C9-8C9F-DF76E375AD6F.jpeg
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
86 ssinit said:
I wouldn’t worry about the hole. I hate to take off leaves on swords till they start growing good. Than I will take off the outside leaves as they start dying.
I like your lighting schedule. It keeps algae from growing like crazy. Are you using or plan to use co2. I don’t use it but do use the api co2 booster. It’s more of an algeside than co2 but it does help. Just has to be used daily.
05AD30CD-E65D-48C9-8C9F-DF76E375AD6F.jpeg
I do not use CO2. My dad does have this thing that carbonates water... It takes the tap water and the carbonates it. Could I add that to the tank if I added declorhinator to it? Thanks!
 
86 ssinit
Member
No I wouldn’t. If it worked everybody would be using them . But maybe someone here has tried it. Again I don’t use co2.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
86 ssinit said:
No I wouldn’t. If it worked everybody would be using them . But maybe someone here has tried it. Again I don’t use co2.
Probably not considering that the thing cost more than a CO2 system would cost you.
 
86 ssinit
Member
Lol yes just looked them up and some are pricey. No clue how you would regulate something like that. But I think it’s like apples and oranges.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
86 ssinit said:
Lol yes just looked them up and some are pricey. No clue how you would regulate something like that. But I think it’s like apples and oranges.
I mean with my water change I could just add a cup full in... I'll look into it a bit more.
 
86 ssinit
Member
I don’t know but messing with co2 could have bad results. You don’t need it yet. Just enjoy where you are. Are you interested in plants. I have many I could send you.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
86 ssinit said:
I don’t know but messing with co2 could have bad results. You don’t need it yet. Just enjoy where you are. Are you interested in plants. I have many I could send you.
I may want some plants for my 5g... How much are you charging and what do you have? I'm not going to mess with it.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
UPDATE:
I added the 2 White Clouds to the 29g to keep the tank cycled while I get some more money for fish.
 
LilyPipeDreams
Member
Lovely project! Will be following and watching
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
LilyPipeDreams said:
Lovely project! Will be following and watching
Thanks!
 
AP1
Member
AcornTheBetta said:
Updates:
  1. There is a lot of melt and algae
    20201015_204935.jpg
Basic idea is that planting fast growing plants that use up available nutrients from the tank will reduce or eliminate the nutrients available for algae.

I am not much more than a beginner aquarist, but I have achieved good success in a dirted aquarium (miracle gro substrate capped with play sand) by using fairly heavy planting to suck up nutrients before they can be used to grow algae--I have had basically zero algae problems and good (though not spectacular) plant growth overall. Of course, a nerite snail and mystery snail and reasonable stocking load also help. Others with more experience may chime in with thoughts, but I wonder whether it would be too late to plant some fast-growing plants to suck up nutrients/battle the algae? (I had originally posted a link to a very good article on this subject, but I guess there is a no links rule, so you will have to do some searching on your own on the subject)
 
LilyPipeDreams
Member
Like the above post, my experience is somewhat limited and largely based on what I’ve read. There are a few things you could try:
  • Reduce the overall strength of light to 70-80% but keep the same photo period. I’m currently running a 6.5 hour period that ramps up to ~85%. Encountering diatoms now but that’s to be expected.
  • If you can reduce the strength of the blue spectrum on your LED - not familiar with your light - that may help? I’ve read and seen some videos where people will reduce it down to about 25% or less with good results It may largely be coincidental however. Blue spectrum does penetrate the deepest however but if your only using low-medium light plants, it should be fine
  • Algaecide such as Excel or API CO2 Booster. Although it does take some experimentation in its approach and the recommended dosing may not necessarily be enough based on how planted your tank is
  • Intro some faster growing plants like crypt wendtii or lutea, or sagittaria. That may help some?
  • And cut back heavily on the ferts? I can’t remember if your dosing but if you’ve got a nutrient rich substrate, it will leech into the water column and could contribute to heavier algae outbreaks. I know that too many ferts will not necessarily cause algae but if things are out of balance, it will make any problem worse no doubt.
Those are a few of my thoughts. It can definitely be frustrating but I’m sure it will work out with some determination
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
AP1 said:
Basic idea is that planting fast growing plants that use up available nutrients from the tank will reduce or eliminate the nutrients available for algae.

I am not much more than a beginner aquarist, but I have achieved good success in a dirted aquarium (miracle gro substrate capped with play sand) by using fairly heavy planting to suck up nutrients before they can be used to grow algae--I have had basically zero algae problems and good (though not spectacular) plant growth overall. Of course, a nerite snail and mystery snail and reasonable stocking load also help. Others with more experience may chime in with thoughts, but I wonder whether it would be too late to plant some fast-growing plants to suck up nutrients/battle the algae? (I had originally posted a link to a very good article on this subject, but I guess there is a no links rule, so you will have to do some searching on your own on the subject)
LilyPipeDreams said:
Like the above post, my experience is somewhat limited and largely based on what I’ve read. There are a few things you could try:
  • Reduce the overall strength of light to 70-80% but keep the same photo period. I’m currently running a 6.5 hour period that ramps up to ~85%. Encountering diatoms now but that’s to be expected.
  • If you can reduce the strength of the blue spectrum on your LED - not familiar with your light - that may help? I’ve read and seen some videos where people will reduce it down to about 25% or less with good results It may largely be coincidental however. Blue spectrum does penetrate the deepest however but if your only using low-medium light plants, it should be fine
  • Algaecide such as Excel or API CO2 Booster. Although it does take some experimentation in its approach and the recommended dosing may not necessarily be enough based on how planted your tank is
  • Intro some faster growing plants like crypt wendtii or lutea, or sagittaria. That may help some?
  • And cut back heavily on the ferts? I can’t remember if your dosing but if you’ve got a nutrient rich substrate, it will leech into the water column and could contribute to heavier algae outbreaks. I know that too many ferts will not necessarily cause algae but if things are out of balance, it will make any problem worse no doubt.
Those are a few of my thoughts. It can definitely be frustrating but I’m sure it will work out with some determination
Ok. Thanks for the suggestions! How long should I light this tank for? 8 hours? I am thinking of adding my nerite snail from my betta tank cuz I will be converting my betta tank to blackwater and I don't think he will thrive in that environment.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Ugg! I'm starting to get algae! What do you guys think my lighting schedule should be?
 
Pfrozen
Member
AcornTheBetta said:
Ugg! I'm starting to get algae! What do you guys think my lighting schedule should be?
I can help what's your lighting schedule? I also need your light specs, list of frets, fert schedule, and list of plants. Also what type of algae is it
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Pfrozen
Member
AcornTheBetta said:
Ok.
Lighting schedule: 9am-5pm
Light specs:
Ferts: None (It's a dirted tank)
Plants:
  • Crypt wentii
  • Crypt parva
  • S. Repens
  • Java Fern
  • Java Moss
  • Amazon Sword
  • Anubias Nana Petite
High lighting with no ferts or CO2 is a recipe for disaster my friend. You need a proper balance of all 3. Otherwise you'll continue to have algae problems. Fortunately having no CO2 makes it easier to balance out the lighting and nutrients.

you can either choose moderate lighting with liquid ferts and root tabs or reduce your lighting to the upper end of low lighting with root tabs only. if you dont want to change much i would recommend the root tab only route. unfortunately you cant have high lighting without also having co2 and regimented nutrient dosing. even diy co2 with high lighting is questionable... im making it work in my tank but its taken 2-3 hours of work every day for the past month to get the balance right
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Pfrozen said:
High lighting with no ferts or CO2 is a recipe for disaster my friend. You need a proper balance of all 3. Otherwise you'll continue to have algae problems. Fortunately having no CO2 makes it easier to balance out the lighting and nutrients.

you can either choose moderate lighting with liquid ferts and root tabs or reduce your lighting to the upper end of low lighting with root tabs only. if you dont want to change much i would recommend the root tab only route. unfortunately you cant have high lighting without also having co2 and regimented nutrient dosing. even diy co2 with high lighting is questionable... im making it work in my tank but its taken 2-3 hours of work every day for the past month to get the balance right
I already have root tabs in the substrate along with the dirt. I think I'll do the liquid fert and moderate lighting. How many hours per day should I do for moderate lighting? Should I add the recommended number of ferts or less or more?
 
Pfrozen
Member
AcornTheBetta said:
I already have root tabs in the substrate along with the dirt. I think I'll do the liquid fert and moderate lighting. How many hours per day should I do for moderate lighting? Should I add the recommended number of ferts or less or more?
If your light is dimmable I would reduce it to moderate now.. if you can control the RGB separately then go ahead and reduce your Blue setting by an additional 10% on top of that.. for now just follow the recommended dosing, your root feeders are getting enough from the tabs and your column feeders are slow growers. I recommend adding another column feeder or two actually. water wisteria is an excellent option that I always recommend. no need to follow EI dosing in your case as thats only for high tech and other situations

your lighting schedule should be fine. 7-8 hours is perfect in most cases. if you keep having problems then reduce it to 7.5, see what happens, then 7 if you need to. some people have success with a siesta schedule where they do 4 on, 2 off, 4 on.. or 3.5 on, 2 off, 3.5 on.. etc. that can also help to alleviate algae

when choosing a fertilizer make sure you pick something that has all 3 macros in it, ie. N P and K. some, like leaf zone or thrive s, only contain K plus micros. Believe it or not, my biggest issue with regards to algae was not enough P. a lot of people say that P causes algae... that is not true. not enough P or too much P will cause algae, but that is also true with N and K lol. People often add extra K because it helps your plants absorb other macros and micros. I myself follow 50% of EI dosing but dose K at 75%. most fertilizers on the market have extra K over other macros as a standard and this is why

every type of algae is there for a slightly different reason... green spot is usually too much light, bba is usually because your co2 is too low (although people dont usually get bba under 10 ppm co2 either), staghorn is not enough trace (including iron) or too much iron as well as too much light, hair is usually too much co2 and light combined with not enough macros to support high co2 and high light.. you get my drift. if you have any questions about algae in the future I can help because I spent 2-3 hours every day for the past month dealing with it myself LOL
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Pfrozen said:
If your light is dimmable I would reduce it to moderate now.. if you can control the RGB separately then go ahead and reduce your Blue setting by an additional 10% on top of that.. for now just follow the recommended dosing, your root feeders are getting enough from the tabs and your column feeders are slow growers. I recommend adding another column feeder or two actually. water wisteria is an excellent option that I always recommend. no need to follow EI dosing in your case as thats only for high tech and other situations

your lighting schedule should be fine. 7-8 hours is perfect in most cases. if you keep having problems then reduce it to 7.5, see what happens, then 7 if you need to. some people have success with a siesta schedule where they do 4 on, 2 off, 4 on.. or 3.5 on, 2 off, 3.5 on.. etc. that can also help to alleviate algae

when choosing a fertilizer make sure you pick something that has all 3 macros in it, ie. N P and K. some, like leaf zone or thrive s, only contain K plus micros. Believe it or not, my biggest issue with regards to algae was not enough P. a lot of people say that P causes algae... that is not true. not enough P or too much P will cause algae, but that is also true with N and K lol. People often add extra K because it helps your plants absorb other macros and micros. I myself follow 50% of EI dosing but dose K at 75%. most fertilizers on the market have extra K over other macros as a standard and this is why

every type of algae is there for a slightly different reason... green spot is usually too much light, bba is usually because your co2 is too low (although people dont usually get bba under 10 ppm co2 either), staghorn is not enough trace (including iron) or too much iron as well as too much light, hair is usually too much co2 and light combined with not enough macros to support high co2 and high light.. you get my drift. if you have any questions about algae in the future I can help because I spent 2-3 hours every day for the past month dealing with it myself LOL
Ok. Thanks for the help. I am using Aquarium Co-Op EZ Green Fertilizer. My light is not dimmable, but I think I'll change the schedule. What are some other column feeders?
 
Pfrozen
Member
AcornTheBetta said:
Ok. Thanks for the help. I am using Aquarium Co-Op EZ Green Fertilizer. My light is not dimmable, but I think I'll change the schedule. What are some other column feeders?
Cool if your light isnt dimmable then heres exactly what I would do:

Raise the height of your light
follow a siesta schedule
plant a water wisteria somewhere
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Pfrozen said:
Cool if your light isnt dimmable then heres exactly what I would do:

Raise the height of your light
follow a siesta schedule
plant a water wisteria somewhere
Ok. Are there any plants that I could sub for water wisteria since I don't think it really fits my scape? How should I raise the light (It's one of those that attaches to the frame of the tank)? Would it be bad for the fish if I did 4 on 4 off 4 on?
 
Pfrozen
Member
AcornTheBetta said:
Ok. Are there any plants that I could sub for water wisteria since I don't think it really fits my scape? How should I raise the light (It's one of those that attaches to the frame of the tank)? Would it be bad for the fish if I did 4 on 4 off 4 on?
4 off is a long time, standard siesta is 2 off

mine just has a screw that you loosen and the whole frame moves up by a few inches, im not sure how yours is though

by the way, im only suggesting liquid ferts because you have some column feeders (java fern, java moss, anubias). you dont really have enough in there to justify dosing your whole tank by the label, which is why i was suggesting adding more plants. if you dont want to add more plants you can probably get away with just dosing less than the recommended amount. all those plants are slow growers
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Pfrozen said:
4 off is a long time, standard siesta is 2 off

mine just has a screw that you loosen and the whole frame moves up by a few inches, im not sure how yours is though

by the way, im only suggesting liquid ferts because you have some column feeders (java fern, java moss, anubias). you dont really have enough in there to justify dosing your whole tank by the label, which is why i was suggesting adding more plants. if you dont want to add more plants you can probably get away with just dosing less than the recommended amount. all those plants are slow growers
Ok. 4 on 2 off 4 on?
 
Pfrozen
Member
AcornTheBetta said:
Ok. 4 on 2 off 4 on?
start with that for now. keep in mind you might continue to have algae problems even if you raise your light to the maximum height and use a siesta schedule. your light is even more powerful than mine and you have a low light tank with no co2 (unless you count the sword which is moderate light). if thats the case then I would buy a controller and dim your lights plus reduce the blue setting by an extra 10%
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Pfrozen here is the algae. What type is it? How do I stop it?

20201020_094732 (1).jpg
 
DarkOne
Member
No ferts with a dirted tank! The whole purpose of a dirted tank is so you don't need ferts at all, especially root tabs.

Lighting at 4 on, 2 off, 4 on is good to start with and you can adjust YOUR tank from there.

Algae happens in all new tanks and YOUR tank will need time to get adjusted/balanced before you don't get algae.

The algae in the pic is hair algae. You have to pull it out to get rid of it. You have too much nutrients in the water which is why you're getting hair algae. Stop using any and all ferts. Do a 50-75% water change and leave it alone for a month other than water changes. Balance can take months, not days so you need patience.

STOP USING FERTS.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
DarkOne said:
No ferts with a dirted tank! The whole purpose of a dirted tank is so you don't need ferts at all, especially root tabs.

Lighting at 4 on, 2 off, 4 on is good to start with and you can adjust YOUR tank from there.

Algae happens in all new tanks and YOUR tank will need time to get adjusted/balanced before you don't get algae.

The algae in the pic is hair algae. You have to pull it out to get rid of it. You have too much nutrients in the water which is why you're getting hair algae. Stop using any and all ferts. Do a 50-75% water change and leave it alone for a month other than water changes. Balance can take months, not days so you need patience.

STOP USING FERTS.
Ok. I didn't use ferts in my last water change. I'll do a 50% today.
 
Pfrozen
Member
I disagree completely with the no ferts in a dirted tank thing. that only works if you use aquasoil. the dirt in my tank contains no nutrients at all, its only peat and compost.

also, non-root feeders will not pull nutrients from root tabs.

in my dirted tank WITH root tabs my root feeders are already showing N+trace deficiencies.

If i remember correctly, OP is using potting mix (or am i wrong? i very well could be.)

remember I am not an expert, i am following the advice of Tom Barr and it has been a godsend to me so far. he is regarded as one of the authorities on planted tanks

to answer your question, that is hair algae caused by too much light with no co2 and no nutrients in the water column. you need to lower your light significantly to reduce it. manual removal will work for now, literally just pull it out with your hands

DarkOne said:
No ferts with a dirted tank! The whole purpose of a dirted tank is so you don't need ferts at all, especially root tabs.

Lighting at 4 on, 2 off, 4 on is good to start with and you can adjust YOUR tank from there.

Algae happens in all new tanks and YOUR tank will need time to get adjusted/balanced before you don't get algae.

The algae in the pic is hair algae. You have to pull it out to get rid of it. You have too much nutrients in the water which is why you're getting hair algae. Stop using any and all ferts. Do a 50-75% water change and leave it alone for a month other than water changes. Balance can take months, not days so you need patience.

STOP USING FERTS.
Op is not using ferts right now. he just happens to have a bottle of EZ green

imbalances arent always caused by too much of something, a lot of the time its due to having not enough. there are no nutrients in Ops water column right now, he is currently running high light with no ferts and no co2
 
DarkOne
Member
A dirted tank with potting mix (which is what she's using) will leech nutrients into the water column. I have started 3 small dirted tanks with potting mix and all 3 had an initial bout of algae or brown diatom for the first few weeks to a couple of months. This is because the tank is new and still trying to maintain a balance of nutrients, light, O2, etc. I've had root and water column feeding plants.

OP stated that she's using root tabs. That will leech into the water column and cause too much nutrients and promote green algae. Imbalances are always too much of something and not enough of another. One of the reasons for big water changes in the beginning is to get rid of the excess nutrients in the water column that can and usually does cause algae and diatoms.

I recommended the light to her as it would be considered med-high for her 29g tank. It would be considered high light on a 10g or 20g long but not a 29g that's 6" taller. Light needs to be exponentially stronger to get thru water. That's one of the reasons I recommended her to keep the water level lower for the first few weeks so the rooted plants can get the light they need to grow strong roots initially.
 
Pfrozen
Member
DarkOne said:
A dirted tank with potting mix (which is what she's using) will leech nutrients into the water column. I have started 3 small dirted tanks with potting mix and all 3 had an initial bout of algae or brown diatom for the first few weeks to a couple of months. This is because the tank is new and still trying to maintain a balance of nutrients, light, O2, etc. I've had root and water column feeding plants.

OP stated that she's using root tabs. That will leech into the water column and cause too much nutrients and promote green algae. Imbalances are always too much of something and not enough of another. One of the reasons for big water changes in the beginning is to get rid of the excess nutrients in the water column that can and usually does cause algae and diatoms.

I recommended the light to her as it would be considered med-high for her 29g tank. It would be considered high light on a 10g or 20g long but not a 29g that's 6" taller. Light needs to be exponentially stronger to get thru water. That's one of the reasons I recommended her to keep the water level lower for the first few weeks so the rooted plants can get the light they need to grow strong roots initially.
4500 lumens is high light for any tank, thats well over 100 PAR even with OPs tank height. You recommended high light for a low tech tank with no ferts and no CO2?

Lets agree to disagree here friend. Fishlore is a magical, wholesome place and I don't come here to argue

I would like to encourage OP to look into this herself as well as get opinions from others aside from myself and the other commentors in this thread
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
DarkOne said:
A dirted tank with potting mix (which is what she's using) will leech nutrients into the water column. I have started 3 small dirted tanks with potting mix and all 3 had an initial bout of algae or brown diatom for the first few weeks to a couple of months. This is because the tank is new and still trying to maintain a balance of nutrients, light, O2, etc. I've had root and water column feeding plants.

OP stated that she's using root tabs. That will leech into the water column and cause too much nutrients and promote green algae. Imbalances are always too much of something and not enough of another. One of the reasons for big water changes in the beginning is to get rid of the excess nutrients in the water column that can and usually does cause algae and diatoms.

I recommended the light to her as it would be considered med-high for her 29g tank. It would be considered high light on a 10g or 20g long but not a 29g that's 6" taller. Light needs to be exponentially stronger to get thru water. That's one of the reasons I recommended her to keep the water level lower for the first few weeks so the rooted plants can get the light they need to grow strong roots initially.
Lol. It's he just FIY. Do you think I should get another root feeder to help with the excess nutrients?
Pfrozen said:
4500 lumens is high light for any tank, thats well over 100 PAR even with OPs tank height. You recommended high light for a low tech tank with no ferts and no CO2?

Lets agree to disagree here friend. Fishlore is a magical, wholesome place and I don't come here to argue

I would like to encourage OP to look into this herself as well as get opinions from others aside from myself and the other commentors in this thread
I will see if anyone else wants to chime in.
 
DarkOne
Member
Pfrozen said:
4500 lumens is high light for any tank, thats well over 100 PAR even with OPs tank height. You recommended high light for a low tech tank with no ferts and no CO2?

Lets agree to disagree here friend. Fishlore is a magical, wholesome place and I don't come here to argue

I would like to encourage OP to look into this herself as well as get opinions from others aside from myself and the other commentors in this thread
You might want to take your own advice and look into how lumens are rated before posting misleading statements. You might also want to research how PAR is recorded. Most people parrot this info w/o knowing how to apply it to certain tanks.
 
LilyPipeDreams
Member
I think that given everything here you need to pick one course of action and stick to it for a couple weeks. Everything I’ve read and seen tells me that going around making little changes here and there will really lead you down the rabbit hole.

Are you using an algaecide? Excel perhaps? You could do spot dosing on heavily effected areas, change water 2-3x a week (30% each time) and run with your plan of siesta’d light sched.

You probably have nutrient rich water because your algae is coming in hard. Right now the algae has the upper hand and is soaking up that excess. It didn’t cause it; it’s just feeding on it.

As far as fert/no fert, you’re always going to hear some that do and others that don’t. Figure out what works for you.

I use ADA AS, and I read from some that they didn’t fert for the first month. I started right away, I chose to dose the upper level of what’s recommended but spread it out over the week. I also change 15-20% twice a week. I also happen to use ThriveS, which has lower N and P, so I’m not driving my Nitrates and Phosphorus up, I also happen to have a lot of fast-medium growing plants (mix of WC and root feeders) which are feeding like crazy on it

I guess what I’m trying to say is figure out what your plants need, based on their requirements. I built my whole tank around high-light and CO2.

If you roll it back a bit, heavily clean, use Excel and change frequently, you’ll probably ride it out. And if you decide not to use ferts for say, two weeks, the worse case is you start to see some plant deficiencies and you can go from there. They won’t die, they’re not CO2, light hungry fiends.

#endrant lol
 
Pfrozen
Member
The Beamswork DA full spectrum light for planted tanks would give OP a PAR of around 50 in his tank, which would be perfect. I applaud you for that recommendation if that is the one you meant to recommend. This is data coming from the company



however, the one OP actually purchased is not the full spectrum version. OP bought the 10000k version meant for reef tanks. It is a marine light that is much brighter. It also contains way too much blue light because its a marine light not meant for freshwater setups.

That being said, the 6500k version that OP should have purchased comes in at 2700 lumens. Not 4500 lumens like the 10000k version he has. If you don't think 4500 lumens is high light then I'm not sure what else to say lol. Its not even meant for plants.

Thank you for your concern, but I understand PAR and lumens. No need to be rude. I will take your advice and suggest that you do the same.

Either way you slice this situation, OPs light is giving him algae. Like everyone here I am simply trying to help. I didn't "want" to argue, but please don't call my statements misleading. OP is trying to grow plants with a coral light and I'm not the one who said it was a good idea. So, again, lets agree to disagree here

PS: OP did you send me the wrong link when I asked btw? If you just sent me the wrong one and you actually do have the 6500k version meant for planted tanks then this whole conversation is meaningless haha. please let me know
 
DarkOne
Member
I'm sorry you took my post as being rude but that wasn't my intention. I do stand by what I posted though.

I recommended the 10,000k light over the 6500k because I was getting better growth with it. I have 16 tanks with lights from Aquaneat and shop lights (6500k) to Fluval 2.0 and 3.0 and a few Beamswork DAs. Most of my planted tanks are 6500k but a couple with 10000k lights seems to grow low tech plants the best, especially swords. Even with minimal ferts and some root tabs. I've also killed off fish and plecos because I followed the recommended dosage of ferts and water changes.

10000k lights also look better, IMO.
 
Pfrozen
Member
DarkOne said:
I'm sorry you took my post as being rude but that wasn't my intention. I do stand by what I posted though.

I recommended the 10,000k light over the 6500k because I was getting better growth with it. I have 16 tanks with lights from Aquaneat and shop lights (6500k) to Fluval 2.0 and 3.0 and a few Beamswork DAs. Most of my planted tanks are 6500k but a couple with 10000k lights seems to grow low tech plants the best, especially swords. Even with minimal ferts and some root tabs. I've also killed off fish and plecos because I followed the recommended dosage of ferts and water changes.

10000k lights also look better, IMO.
Eh its okay, I was probably a bit grumpy yesterday lol. My apologies as well. I've seen your tanks and there's no denying that they look beautiful!

I do wonder about OPs algae problem though. That amount of green hair algae is pretty excessive and likely does point to an extreme excess of light. Could there be another imbalance somewhere that we aren't thinking of maybe?
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Pfrozen said:
Eh its okay, I was probably a bit grumpy yesterday lol. My apologies as well. I've seen your tanks and there's no denying that they look beautiful!

I do wonder about OPs algae problem though. That amount of green hair algae is pretty excessive and likely does point to an extreme excess of light. Could there be another imbalance somewhere that we aren't thinking of maybe?
Maybe substrate, but IDK.
 
DarkOne
Member
AcornTheBetta said:
Maybe substrate, but IDK.
I'm almost certain that it's the 8hrs of non-stop light and ferts. The one thing I didn't address was the lighting period. Most of my tanks have 3h on, 3h off, 5-6h on. 4-2-4 is good too. I use smart plugs for all my lights. They're controlled with a free app (Smart Life) and also connected to Alexa so voice controlled either individually or groups.

https://www.amazon.com/Outlet-Required-Gosund-Upgraded-Version/dp/B07GRLQV47/

Also, the substrate will leech excess nutrients into the water column. It happens in almost all new dirted tanks. Plants usually take a month to acclimate in a new tank and some melting is normal. Cut the melting leaves and new leaves will grow.
 
  • Thread Starter
AcornTheBetta
Member
Ok. Question: Do you think I should get shrimp for this tank?
BTW here is a video of me unboxing plants for the 29g and my 5g.
 
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