About Neon Tetras

Discussion in 'Aquarium Stocking Questions' started by Reema, Jun 12, 2018.

  1. Reema

    Reema Valued Member Member

    So I finally got fed up with my slightly overstocked 10 gal and constant ammonia levels, and took back my 6 rasboras for a trade in. Kept only my betta and poof, ammonia gone within 2 days. Been fighting it for 2 months.
    Then, I ignored some sage advice, rolled the dice and got 2 common molly. Boy did that NOT go well with Itchy (that's what my son named the betta). He bullied those poor mollies all day long. He's not itching btw LOL. Sure enough, its back to the store to return the mollies. Lesson learned. Itchy got his domain back all to himself.
    Contemplating getting a school of neon tetras.
    Questions: How many can I comfortably stock in my 10 gal with the betta ? Are they delicate picky fish ? Why so many people say that they tend to die off a lot ?
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2018
  2. JoeCamaro

    JoeCamaro Well Known Member Member

    Most people agree that Neon Tetras should be housed in a 20G, because they are active and need a little more space.
    I am no stocking experte, so I hope somebody can help you with that pert of the question.
    I own Neon Tetras. This is my experience with them. They are good, easy to keep, not picky at all fish IF they manage to survive the first week or so. I had 2 batches of neon tetras die, one by one, but I didn't give up. 2 of them from the second group survived. After a month of staying alive I added more. I was lucky to get a good group. I now have 12 of them. They used to be shy and just stay in the same spot for the most part until I added more plants. The more plants they happier they look and the more active they are. They eat whatever I feed them. I feed them dried blood worms, flakes, decapsulated brine shrimp eggs, live brine shrimp, live grindal worms, dried shrimp, pellets, granules and they eat everything.

    You just have to get good stock. If you do, they will be fine.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Reema

    Reema Valued Member Member

    My tank is very well planted for a 10 gal.
    Lots of spaces to swim between, hide or explore. Water parameters also A+
    So it's like a hit or miss with these guys ?
     




  4. finnipper59

    finnipper59 Well Known Member Member

    Neon have honestly been difficult to keep over the past couple of decades. Some hobbyist claim that since they're easy to breed rather than catch from the wild that they have become too inbred to resist disease. They are not guaranteed to become diseased, but make sure your tank is fully cycled with good and clean water perameters before trying neons. Ask the place where you are buying them from what their water pH is an make sure that is no more than 0.2 degrees different for best results.
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Reema

    Reema Valued Member Member

    My current water PH is slightly below the neutral 7.
    I'm bleeding money on this tank. Fish keeping is like gambling. LOL
     
  6. IHaveADogToo

    IHaveADogToo Well Known Member Member

    1: Neon Tetras may nip at (and damage) your betta's fins
    2: 10 gallons is too small for neon tetras
    3: All these new fish going in and out of your betta's tank.... you're lucky one of them hasn't brought a disease into the tank yet. You should always quarantine new fish before introducing them to your existing fish. (You mentioned fish keeping is like gambling - just imagine if one of those failed tank mates brought a disease with it)
    4: I can't advise you to get neon tetras at this time because something is wrong with the neon tetra stock in North America right now - bad genetics - disease prone - short lived - unless you know a breeder, avoid neon tetras at this time. If you do get neon tetras, this makes the quarantine period even more important.
    5: Bettas in general aren't great with tank mates, especially other fish. They are much better with bottom dwellers as tank mates.
    6: Here are some compatible 10 gallon tank mates for a betta: Some Bigger Shrimp, Snails, Kuhli Loaches, Pygmy Cories.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Reema

    Reema Valued Member Member

    Thank you for the advice. Won't get any.
    Don't loaches get too big for a 10 gal ?
     
  8. IHaveADogToo

    IHaveADogToo Well Known Member Member

    Most loaches do, but kuhli loaches are the exception. They are like tiny little eels. They get up to 4 inches long but they are about as thin as a drinking straw. They have a very tiny bio load so the "one inch of fish per gallon" rule doesn't really apply with them.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Reema

    Reema Valued Member Member

    Thanks. Also about how many cory can I stock? Obviously the 6 harlequin rasboras that I had were to much load.
     
  10. finnipper59

    finnipper59 Well Known Member Member

    I agree, but if you go with pygmy corys, their cool, but get 8 to 10. I put 4 in my 10 gallon betta tank and barely ever saw the little critters. I wish now bought 10.
     
  11. IHaveADogToo

    IHaveADogToo Well Known Member Member

    Agreed - 10 pygmy cory would be good. Just make sure they're the pygmys, because other corys get too big for a 10 gallon tank.

    - or -

    6 Kuhli loaches would be good.

    Don't do both the loaches and the corys. Do one or the other.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    Reema

    Reema Valued Member Member

    Would 10 be ok for a 10 gal ? Not too much ?
     
  13. Smalltownfishfriend

    Smalltownfishfriend Well Known Member Member

    I have always heard that the minimum size for pygmy corydoras is 20 gallons..??
     
  14. finnipper59

    finnipper59 Well Known Member Member

    You can keep a school of 5 regular cories or 10 pygmies. If your substrate is gravel instead of sand, go with the pygmies. They don't dig and won't harm their little barbels.
     
  15. IHaveADogToo

    IHaveADogToo Well Known Member Member

    Keep in mind, if your betta does not work out with Kuhli Loaches or Pygmy Corys, then tank mates aren't for him. We cant guarantee any fish will be a good match with your betta, as bettas have individual personalities like people do. He might love tank mates. Or he might chase and flare at anything you put in his tank. Some bettas just don't work with tank mates. And that's okay. Corys and kuhli loaches are some of the most peaceful fish in the hobby so if he works with them, great, but if he doesn't that's a pretty good indicator he's meant to be a loner.
     
  16. finnipper59

    finnipper59 Well Known Member Member

    I own pygmy corys and they school happily in the 10 gallon tank with my betta.
     
  17. Smalltownfishfriend

    Smalltownfishfriend Well Known Member Member

    Ok very good!! I just remembe reading some other posts that the minimum size was recommended to be 20.. but let's be honest.. there are very few 'rules" to fish keeping!!:)
     
  18. finnipper59

    finnipper59 Well Known Member Member

    Yes. They're tiny and won't overload the filtration system. They will also take care of uneaten betta food that makes it to the bottom. Rotting uneaten food produces more toxins than fish poop.
     
  19. OP
    OP
    Reema

    Reema Valued Member Member

    He did well with the rasboras. Never even agnowledge them.

    I hand feed my betta 3 to 4 pellets and he gobbles them right up. No food waste there. :)
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 16, 2018
  20. finnipper59

    finnipper59 Well Known Member Member

    My betta and pygmy corys just ignore each other.
    Good. The pygmy corys prefer tiny crushed flakes that are shaken in a small pill bottle with tank water to make them sink.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jun 16, 2018
  21. IHaveADogToo

    IHaveADogToo Well Known Member Member

    My corys (granted they're not pygmys) LOVE algae wafers. IDK why. It doesn't even have all the nutrition they need. I drop one in my tank for my snail and my corys occupy it until it's gone.
     




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