A new study on marine fish & artificial lighting released, what are your experiences?

pagoda

A new study into the lifespan of coral inhabiting fish has discovered that those who live closer to the shoreline, and night time artificial lighting, have shorter lifespans and tend to be smaller than those who live far out at sea

Obviously those on the forum with saltwater aquariums use artificial lighting, so what are your thoughts on this study and have you noticed any behavioural differences or have you found fish dying off faster or not growing as big as you expected?

https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2021.0454

It is quite a long but interesting read and as someone who has not and unlikely to have saltwater aquatics, I thought it would be interesting to see if anyone has experienced these sort of findings in their aquariums too.
 

ChrissFishes01

A new study into the lifespan of coral inhabiting fish has discovered that those who live closer to the shoreline, and night time artificial lighting, have shorter lifespans and tend to be smaller than those who live far out at sea

Obviously those on the forum with saltwater aquariums use artificial lighting, so what are your thoughts on this study and have you noticed any behavioural differences or have you found fish dying off faster or not growing as big as you expected?

https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/10.1098/rspb.2021.0454

It is quite a long but interesting read and as someone who has not and unlikely to have saltwater aquatics, I thought it would be interesting to see if anyone has experienced these sort of findings in their aquariums too.
Most fish we keep in aquariums are going to be smaller than the largest wild specimens - it's very difficult to get them same variety (and quality) of foods that a fish will have access to in a natural reef. The size difference shouldn't be significant, but yes, I'd say that's to be expected. I don't think it's to do with light, but I haven't done a study, either.

I don't run my lights at night (no moonlights) on any of my tanks, so it's usually nearly pitch-black in the room overnight. But even if I did (and so did everyone else) most hobbyists would never have an issue with artificial lighting killing their fish. Most people are still losing fish to disease, tank hazards (jumping, equipment failure, etc.), and aggression long before they reach old age. Even the people that do have some old saltwater fish - I wonder just how far down the list lighting is. I'm sure there are a million things we can improve in our aquariums to prolong our fish's life before we get to lighting.
 
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Jesterrace

Honestly I think the "research" is more than a little silly since there are so many factors that could affect life spans and size of fish besides lighting (ie more pollutants closer to shore, fish that have inherently shorter life spans by nature living closer to shore, or simply the fact that big fish don't spend a lot of time right near the shore line). I can honestly say I don't think fish give a hoot about lighting as long as it isn't really intense or some really odd spectrum (ie someone putting a hydroponic grow light over their tank).
 
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