How Do I A lot to take in - Page 2

Stang Man

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zeeter said:
There's more of a need in Saltwater for RO/DI than in FW. As long as you condition for chlorine in Freshwater you're probably fine. But in Saltwater the fish are much, much more sensitive to the many different chemicals in the water. Plus the phosphate seeps into the live rock and causes huge algae problems and coral growth stunting. Even if you switch over to RO/DI after a few months the rocks will continue to leach out the phosphate for many months after that. For me it's been nine months since I switched over and I still get phosphate buildups to the point where I had to run a phosban reactor.
+1 Zeeter!!! Thank You!!!
 
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xxSTEPHENSxx

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hahaha! I went to the LFS and I may just get a 29gal Bio cube. Would this be a good starter tank?
 

zeeter

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That's not a bad place to start because everything you need is right there for you. Just know that the larger the tank, the easier the maintenance - even thought he equipment costs more.

Another disadvantage is that you can't keep most of the more popular Saltwater fish in a 29gl tank.
On the other hand, the biocubes don't require too much maintenance other than water changes.
 

Stang Man

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Jaime said:
hahaha! I went to the LFS and I may just get a 29gal Bio cube. Would this be a good starter tank?
IMO the Bio cube cost more then it really is worth if you want to spend that much you can get a standard tank that is bigger and do as much DIY to the tank as possible and you will spend less. If you decide on cube I would suggest that you get HQI lighting for corals and you will be much happier in the end!!!
 

zeeter

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Yeah that's the benefit of a larger traditional tank system. I got my tank set up and started thinking - why do I need to have a $40 fish tank under the tank as a sump when I can buy a $5 rubbermaid container? Why do I have to run my refugium through the sump when I can run it in another tank? There's so much that you can do - I still fall asleep at night designing new sump systems in my head.

That said, the biocubes do have the advantage of everything being there all neatly wrapped up in a nice package.
 
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xxSTEPHENSxx

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Ok. I really wanted to do a custom setup but I started looking and it looked like it would cost more than the $299 biocube. Since that is not the case I would like to do a custom. So I am going to put together a list and post it to see what I am missing and what you guys think of it.
 

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It's probably going to cost more than $299 unless you're finding some stuff used. That's one of the advantages to the cheaper brands of all in one tanks. Lighting is probably going to be the biggest part of the expense if you set up your own tank. The $299 Biocube is the power compact model. As Stang mentioned, you are going to be somewhat limited in your selection of corals. Rule out all sps corals pretty much. You might be able to grow birdsnest up near the top of the tank but that'll be about it. If you're good with being limited to soft corals and some of the easier LPS (euphyllia, caulastrea, acanthastrea, etc.) then you'll enjoy the Biocube. If you think you'll want to get into sps corals in the future, I'd go ahead and piece together your own tank now or you'll want to upgrade later.
 

Stang Man

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Like Harpua said it will cost a lot more than $299 to get started!!!If you want to start at that size you will be looking at at the very most 5 bills that doesn't include the better lighting. that is the whole setup not sure what you are looking at?
 
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xxSTEPHENSxx

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Ah ok. Well I really don't mind dropping a few hundred but I didn't really want to get into 800-1000 range if you know what I mean. But like zeeter said... I can cut corners with the rubber made sump and stuff like that. Is there a link or something I can get a run down of everything I need?
 
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xxSTEPHENSxx

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I watched the video under the Saltwater section on the homepage and I better understand what I need now.
 

Stang Man

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For now it is very basic equipment. By the way I have a sump for sale and will sell it cheap if interested. It is a basic sump but for a few more dollors I can do some cool stuff to it. I have some acrylic scrap laying around!! Ahh not sure for shipping how much that would be I would think not much?
 

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From TX to GA, you could probably UPS Ground it for less than $20 (depends a ton on size and weight). It'll probably be cheaper than USPS. My holiday job this year was the UPS store. LOL!
 

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1ea - 20 gallon sturdy, food grade Rubbermaid container that will fit in the bottom of the stand
2ea - Rubbermaid "shoe box" containers
1ea - Cat litter container - empty and cleaned and rinsed THOROUGHLY (the container the litter is purchased in - not the one the cats use)
1ea Drill
1ea large drill bit
1ea small drill bit (small enough that any loose materials cannot get through)
Several used panty hose legs - not the whole stockings

Make many, many, many small holes in the bottom of the "shoebox" containers using the small drill bit. Throw away the lids.
Using the large drill bit, drill several holes in sides of the litter container as close to the bottom as possible.
Place the two shoeboxes (these are plastic, remember - I'm not talking about real shoeboxes) into each other and then into the cat litter container. If the shoeboxes fit too tightly together use some rubber tubing to make stands so that the upper one sits about two inches above the lower one.

Place the cat litter container into the 20 gl rubbermaid container. Place the entire contraption under the tank so that the overflow feeds into the top container. You may need to put the large container in first and then add the filter containers second if space doesn't permit it all at once. Ensure that the pump back to the tank is ready to run.

Run your pump to check the flow. Turn the pump off and adjust the flow through the containers by adding additional holes. Too many holes is not a problem, so long as you don't screw up the structural integrity of the containers.
The top shoebox will be for floss; the bottom shoebox will be for activated carbon - placed into a stocking which is tied off and rinsed. The litter container will release the water that has gone through the filters into the larger rubbermaid. With the holes drilled as close to the bottom as possible it reduces the number of air bubbles that can get through.

Optional: Use a 3rd shoebox set up the same way and put phoslock in it. Phoslock does not leach phosphates or nitrates into the water after a while like other brands do. It also comes with a handy media bag.

Total cost: around $20 for the rubbermaid containers plus filter media. This assumes that you have a drill and drill bits and you know someone who has a cat. With any luck, that person with a cat also can be a steady source for stockings if the DIY person is not female (or a male who wears stockings - no judging going on here).

Come back tomorrow for ways to add a refugium to this setup (you may need to wait until your cat-friend uses up another kitty litter container).
 
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xxSTEPHENSxx

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Alright... I have a good grasp on the sump now. Waiting for the refugium info now!
 

Stang Man

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harpua2002 said:
From TX to GA, you could probably UPS Ground it for less than $20 (depends a ton on size and weight). It'll probably be cheaper than USPS. My holiday job this year was the UPS store. LOL!
Thanks Harpua!!! I bet you had fun standing in line!!! NOT!!!!
 

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