A Good Carbon

Coradee

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Giving this a bump up for you hope our salty members can help answer your question today
 

ystrout

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I used to use Imagitarium carbon in one of the trays of my canister filter. This was for freshwater. It worked well and kept my tank very clear. I stopped using it as I actually like how the tannins look as they leach out of my driftwood.

If I was going to use it in a saltwater tank where the system is super sensitive to phosphates, I'd go with SeaChem products. I've had nothing with good experiences with their stuff, so I trust that their MatrixCarbon has the lowest phosphates on the market.
 

kallililly1973

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Honestly there is really no main reason for carbon aside from getting rid of smelly water or removing meds once a treatment is finished. Personally i would add some polyfill or ceramic type media or even a sponge in place of the carbon cause honestly if you did need to add carbon for some reason those mesh bags can usually be stuffed into an already stuffed filter. Just my thoughts. Good luck!
 
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DavidFishMan

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Using carbon seems too make the water cleaner in my tank. It can remove organics so why wouldn’t you use it. I read the just a little cloud in the water can greatly reduce light penetration to the bottom of the tank not good if you have corals. I know some people do not use it but I wonder why not use it if will help clean the water.
 

kallililly1973

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Using carbon seems too make the water cleaner in my tank. It can remove organics so why wouldn’t you use it. I read the just a little cloud in the water can greatly reduce light penetration to the bottom of the tank not good if you have corals. I know some people do not use it but I wonder why not use it if will help clean the water.
Oppps sorry hahahah i was referring to a freshwater setup i'm sorry didn't see it was in the saltwater section... ( whistling and slowly walking away )
 

ystrout

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Ya I agree it's really not necessary in freshwater, unless you are removing meds.

Is it pretty common in saltwater?
 

Lchi87

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It’s pretty common in saltwater but especially useful when you have corals. When they start to encroach on eachother’s space, they battle it out by releasing toxins into the water, like underwater chemical warfare. The activated carbon helps soak that up, along with odors, general contaminants etc. Hope that helps.
 

ystrout

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It’s pretty common in saltwater but especially useful when you have corals. When they start to encroach on eachother’s space, they battle it out by releasing toxins into the water, like underwater chemical warfare. The activated carbon helps soak that up, along with odors, general contaminants etc. Hope that helps.
Oh interesting! Are the coral toxins harmful to fish or people? Or just the other corals?
 
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DavidFishMan

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It’s pretty common in saltwater but especially useful when you have corals. When they start to encroach on eachother’s space, they battle it out by releasing toxins into the water, like underwater chemical warfare. The activated carbon helps soak that up, along with odors, general contaminants etc. Hope that helps.
That does help. Thank you.
 

NC122606

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Oh interesting! Are the coral toxins harmful to fish or people? Or just the other corals?
Actually yes! Palytoxin comes from Zoanthids, it mostly happens when you are going hard on it like fragging it too much. If you do not have Carbon this can get into the air and affect humans but not fish, corals, and inverts. This can be fatal to humans if there is no help within time and there is tons of symptoms for this.
 

ystrout

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Actually yes! Palytoxin comes from Zoanthids, it mostly happens when you are going hard on it like fragging it too much. If you do not have Carbon this can get into the air and affect humans but not fish, corals, and inverts. This can be fatal to humans if there is no help within time and there is tons of symptoms for this.
Oh wow that's pretty crazy! I didn't know that.

I never thought fish keeping could be dangerous haha.
 
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