A Fish Just Died How Do I Stop This In The Future

Ethan30

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I had a Blue Drarf GaramI (found out it was actually a drawf). I got and Albino Pleco and it just died. My dad whent our and got a new one and 3 shrimp. So I have 5 shrimp a pleco, guppy and a Garamis.

Update: 7 shrimp
 

Momgoose56

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PascalKrypt said:
You're going to have to provide us with some more information in order to tell you what went wrong. Try filling out the information on this template and post it here.

Alternatively, you can read up on the beginner guides in this thread, they have a lot of info.
Ethan, you have been struggling with sick fish for a month now. Your tank wasn't cycled at the beginning and your fish are probably dying because they are living in toxic water. Get your dad to test the water for pH, Ammonia, Nitrites and Nitrates. Write the results down and post them on here. Without ALL that information, we can't help you and your fish will keep dying. Fill out the form on the link provided by PascalKrypt above COMPLETELY. Better yet, have your dad fill it out since he is the one that is doing the testing. OR Read the directions on the test strip package and do the testing yourself. You should learn to do that anyway.
 
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Ethan30

Ethan30

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Thank you for the help. I will try and look for the water tests and try and get a water change done. Thank you for the help this past Mounth.

Edit: Added in stuff form the Acruel Water kit
 

Princethepurplebetta

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Please click on the blue link that PascalKrypt replied with and post the answers onto this thread. Otherwise We Cant Help.
 
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Ethan30

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Did water change. Ok.

I don’t have much info I’ll do what I can. What is the water volume of the tank? 10g
How long has the tank been running? A few weeks
Does it have a filter? Yes
Does it have a heater? Yes
What is the water temperature? 78of
What is the entire stocking of this tank? (Please list all fish and inverts.)
6 Ghost Shrimp
1 Blue Drawf Garamis
1 Albino Bushynoise Pleco
1 Guppy

Maintenance
How often do you change the water? Every few weeks
How much of the water do you change? 30%
What do you use to treat your water? Acruel wave kit and Aquoen water treatment
Do you vacuum the substrate or just the water?
Neither

*Parameters - Very Important
Did you cycle your tank before adding fish? I ran it for on day
What do you use to test the water?
I lost the test strips
What are your parameters? We need to know the exact numbers, not just “fine” or “safe”.
Lost test strips
Ammonia:
Nitrite:
Nitrate:
pH:

Feeding
How often do you feed your fish? 1 time a day for most plus Pleco feeding
How much do you feed your fish? 1 pinch Tropical Fish flakes and 1/3-1/5 of an alge wafer
What brand of food do you feed your fish? Aquion Tropical fish flakes, Tetra Pro Pleco wafers
Do you feed frozen or freeze-dried foods?

Illness & Symptoms
How long have you had this fish? A few weeks
How long ago did you first notice these symptoms? The entire time
In a few words, can you explain the symptoms?
Have you started any treatment for the illness?
Was your fish physically ill or injured upon purchase?
How has its behavior and appearance changed, if at all?

Explain your emergency situation in detail. Fish keep dying. Less now. But still happens

Edit: ran it for a few days
 

jennalynnj

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HI Ethan
Her are my thoughts:
See about getting a siphon hose/vacuum. They are a few bucks at Walmart or amazon. Start doing water changes daily for now. Someone may be better able to advise on how much water. I like to do 2.5 gallons treated with prime. I use a 5 gallon bucket for siphoning out water and poop. (Unplug your heater if you are going for a large water change or it could break) then I rinse the bucket in the bathtub and fill it halfway. I have a thermometer to check but try to get the temp close to tank water. (Bring bucket by tank and check with same hand if there is much difference?) Get SEACHEM PRIME when you get that siphon hose vacuum. One bottle will last a looong time. You can dose a bit higher right now since you probably have high ammonia in your tank BUT you don't need much Prime for 2.5 gallons. I will try to find small dosage amounts for you. If the fish has been showing symptoms from the very beginning it could be something else but water changes everyday with Prime to temporarily bind ammonia until you get a bacteria colony is going to help everyone in the tank! I hope this helps. If you can, get an API test kit, and start testing to see if your tank is cycling at all yet. If you can't get one, your cheapest and best way to help your fish is, as I said, daily water changes dosed with Prime.
 
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Ethan30

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Thank you for all the recommendations. I will try and water change. More often.

Also do you think the GouramI died because of Ammonia spike due to fish swap? And would daily water changes shock the fish. Mabye 10% changes slowly
 

PascalKrypt

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Ethan30 said:
Thank you for all the recommendations. I will try and water change. More often.

Also do you think the GouramI died because of Ammonia spike due to fish swap? And would daily water changes shock the fish. Mabye 10% changes slowly
Doing a 'fish swap', whatever you mean by that, has nothing to do with ammonia being in your tank. But yes, that is what in all likelihood killed your tank. I know chemistry may seem a little daunting, especially at your age, so I will try to keep it simple. Please do take the time to read and carefully think about what is written below. If you still do not understand, you may want to ask someone to help you, as this is really critical information in order to keep fish as pets for any length of time.

Everything living in your aquarium, including fish and plants, creates waste. Think of it as all that stuff that you have to throw away or flush down the sink/toilet daily. Same goes for fish, and for plants. In your aquarium, all this waste has nowhere to go, so it sits at the bottom of your tank or dissolves and mingles with your water. It then breaks down over time. This is how ammonia is produced and ends up in your aquarium. This is also why, as long as you have things living in your aquarium, or toss organic matter in your aquarium (like fish food), it will produce ammonia over time. Your filter does not 'sift' this out of the water mechanically. Your filter contains medium (usually sponges or similar material, sometimes called 'cartridges' in shops) where bacteria grow and live that turn your ammonia into nitrites (also toxic). Another type of bacteria which also live in your filter break this down into nitrates, which is not (very) toxic.
The thing is, when you buy a brand new filter or medium it will not have these bacteria in them. These require weeks to start growing in sufficient numbers to keep up with the waste produced in your aquarium. When you have sufficient numbers, your aquarium is considered 'cycled'. If toxic ammonia and nitrites stay in your water, they will damage and kill your fish's organs, gills, etc. This is why if your aquarium is not cycled (like yours is), you have to do daily water changes. Tap water (usually) does not contain ammonia and nitrites and so swapping out toxic tank water with fresh water will keep the levels of toxic stuff in your tank down (but do keep in mind chlorine in tap water is also toxic so you will need to treat for that every time you use tap water!).
How will you know when you tank is 'cycled' as explained above? There is really only one way to tell, and that is to use tests (strips or liquid) to measure the levels of ammonia, nitrite and nitrate in your tank. If you do not do this, it will be impossible to tell if your water is no longer toxic to your fish because you cannot see/taste/smell ammonia and nitrite.

Daily water changes are, as you said, perhaps not the most pleasant experience for your fish. However, if you do not do them, or only change small amounts of water, your fish will continue to sit in toxic water which is way, way worse! So yes, even if it may potentially shock your fish it is still best to do them.
Water changes don't have to shock your fish though. Just make sure the water you use for the changes has the same parameters (this means similar hardness, PH, etc., all that other stuff on the test strips/kits - see, this is why you really need these) and temperature as the water already in your tank. If so, your fish probably won't mind too much.

As for the amount of water change, the bigger the better (due to math, which again may be daunting but is really important): If you change half of your water, the concentration of anything that was in it but that is not present in the new water is reduced by half. So water with 1 mg/L ammonia of which half is changed with fresh tap water should have 0.5 mg/L ammonia after the water change, which is way better. If you only change 10% of that water, the concentration only goes down by 10%, so after the change your tank would still have 0.9 mg/L ammonia, which is not really any better than the 1 mg/L. So yes, you do really have to do large water changes, 10% does not cut it.
 

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