A 75 gallon ???

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Isabella

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I have been doing a lot of thinking lately ... because I love my baby angels so much, you know, lol. I wanted to wait with my next big planted tank (which would be something around 125 gallons) until I get my own place so that I wouldn't have to struggle with the transfer of such a big tank. Plus, I wouldn't have the time for a heavily planted 125G now anyway.

BUT ... I love these angles so much that I think I will get a 75 gallon in a few months. This doesn't mean I won't get the heavily planted 125G that I always wanted because I will, just not now. In the meantime, maybe I could get the 75 gallon tank which would be definitely less work than a 125G planted, and it would enable me to keep at least some of the 11 angels that I have. Maybe I could even get some other fish to live in the 75 gallon with the angels. It wouldn't be anything that I would consider beautiful in terms of appearance, but it will provide more space for my fishies. So it would essentially be an economical tank.

So ... do you think that would be a good idea? Carol, like I said, I'd like to keep some of these angels, or at least one pair. Could I put all of these little angels, when they're a bit bigger, in the 75 gallon tank and let them grow up there and pair up? Then, when I have selected a pair or two pairs perhaps, could I put my old 2 angles together with these new pairs in the 75 gallon tank? Or will they all fight? How many angelfish pairs do you recommend for a 75 gallon tank? I wouldn't keep more than 6 angels in that 75 gallon. But it would have to be at least 4 angels because I'd like to keep my current pair of angels with the new pair of angels in that 75 gallon tank - they'd all have so much more space. Or should I keep all 11 angles in a 75 gallon tank? (Not really, right?)

Looks like my MTS is progressing to ever more severe stage, lol. By the time I am like 50 years old, I'll probably have my house run over by tanks, lol. (Plus, cats and dogs of course!)
 

Butterfly

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Isabella I have five male angels in my 75 gallon You could probably put all of them in there until their larger and then when they pair up Move them around/give some away. That would allow you to choose and pick for your self.
When I had a female in the 75 gallon the pair kept everybody really upset and everybody was always fighting so now the sexes are seperated.Hope that helps.
Carol
 

ncje

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Isabella this might be my old head talking here, but I absolutely NEVER pair SIBLING fish. Well I try my hardest to not do it. Like buying angels with a slight age difference a month is good (if they come from the same supplier). In Japan I have two LFS and this saturday I will buy two of same angel from one (they currently have two sizes) and one from the competitor. This is one of the reasons I am reluctant to buy from home sellers, because of possible inbreeding. Inbreeding leads to higher rates of deformed offspring and offspring whom are less likely to survive a bout of anything serious.

Anway this is a rule I have always tried to adhere to.
 
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Isabella

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Ncje, that makes sense. It is indeed unhealthy to inbreed siblings of ANY species, right? But I don't want to pair my angels for the purpose of breeding them. I wanted to pair them up so that there are no "outcasts" bothered by the rest - as it often happens with angelfish. I just want to keep some of my babies and ensure that whichever ones I keep won't fight with each other. The only way for them not to fight is to pair them up. I don't really want to breed them. So if it happens that some siblings pair will lay eggs, they'll probably be quickly eaten before they even hatch.

However, if this still poses a problem, please let me know what to do. Is it common for breeders to breed siblings? Has anyone who's reading this ever bred any fish whose parents were siblings? Carol, have you ever selected a siblings pair and bred them? Ncje, what are the chances of deformities occurring with inbreeding? And what kind of deformities are they? Is it still unadvisable to have sibling pairs even if one doesn't intend for them to breed?
 

Jason

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I dont like the idea of inbreeding, but I think people who wanted certain characteristics of fish, inbred them form a good colour variety etc. They have to introduce outside parent fish as otherwise most of the fish will be weak genetically etc. etc. I think you should keep just the best of the bunch, so to speak, if you were to breed the babies and introduce outsiders. 75gal would b cool! ;D
 

Butterfly

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Isabella I was told by a breeder that it was ok to breed the siblings once but not sibs to parents.
The fighting is why I have all males in one tank and all females in another until I want to breed them. They do real well, of course the males spar a little but no damage or real aggression. You could try that and see how it works out.
Carol
 
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Isabella

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I don't care if my "pairs" will be all males, all females, or mixed, as long as I can get some fish that will be all peaceful with each other and with my current breeding pair in a 75 gallon. But I think only a male and a female can be really peaceful with each other. But, we'll see what happens. The reason I want an even number of fish is that there will be no outcast this way (what having an odd number of angels would eventually lead to).
 

ncje

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The other thing as well if you keep some angels together that way, and just let nature take its course when the sibs pair and spawn, most likely someone else in the tank will take care of the eggs (dinner a la carte) for you. So there is no issue at all keeping them in the same tank from that perspective. Others here have experience specifically with angels who could most likely give you great advice as to how to get them living more sociably together.
 

atmmachine816

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Personally I think it's possible that you can keep 10 of them in there possibly 11 but the eleventh might get beat up on because my grandpa kept 6 angels in a 29 gallon and they lived over 10 years in there with 3 corys and I have two of them and my aunt has two but the other two didn't survive the move. It's probably not likely they would do that but if you keep them all together from now on then they might be ok, however if one of them dies then you will have problems. When one of mine got sick the other picked on the other two and I had to get rid of it and now they are fine.
 

fish_r_friend

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i found this i thought you might find it interesting
 
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Isabella

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WOW ... the plants seem to grow like crazy in that tank! And what a beautiful tank it is I knew Diana Walstad's method works. This is not the only successful Walstad tank set-up. I have seen many other people's tanks doing very well. Thanks for the link
 
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