75 Gallon Vs 125 Gallon

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Jim1990

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I have been doing a good amount of research. I have been researching freshwater and saltwater.

As for fresh water I am interested in the angelfish. Mostly the black and white ones. I think they are marbled? I was going to have 2 or 3 of them. The reasoning behind this is because I hear that once they pair up that they CAN become aggressive towards other angelfish?. With that said what can I keep with them for tank mates? I love black or dark colored fish or very bright vibrant ones. Like the rounder size tetra GloFish.

* I am wanting to do a moderate planted aquarium with live plants.

* I was going to use the FX4 as I hear it's best to use a filter that's for larger tanks than what you have. For example if a filter is for 60 gallons then buy a filter that is for 100 gallons.

- Is the 75% rule applied to how many fish I can keep in the tank?

- What do you guys recommend for tank mates?

- Am I on the right track?

- Is the 125 gallon overkill?
 

Crispii

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A larger size aquarium would be better. As for angelfish, you don't want to keep 3 or 2. Try keeping 1 or a 6 angels in the same tank. As for tank mates, they are compatible with most freshwater species such as large size Corydoras, tetras, plecos, and other peaceful cichlids.
 
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Jim1990

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Crispii said:
A larger size aquarium would be better. As for angelfish, you don't want to keep 3 or 2. Try keeping 1 or a 6 angels in the same tank. As for tank mates, they are compatible with most freshwater species such as large size Corydoras, tetras, plecos, and other peaceful cichlids.
Does not the Angel fish eat tetras?
 

Nick72

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Jim1990 said:
Does not the Angel fish eat tetras?
It's possible with Neons but not with larger Tetra
 
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gray_matter16

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Don't get a filter based on what the box says it's good for. Just because the filter box says it's for a 60 or 100 gallon tank, usually doesn't mean that's an appropriately rated filter for your sized tank. What's more important is the filter's gallon per hour (gph) rate. A number to shoot for is a filter with a flow rating that is 5-10x the size of your aquarium. So, for the 75 gallon's case, a good filter would be one that has a GPH between 375gph and 750gph. For a single canister filter that's a lot, so you might need to use multiple canisters, or a sump.

But it's also nuanced like all things. I have a 75 gallon heavily planted tank and mine does fine with 2 canisters that total 265gph, which is about 3.5x. I've also heard large tanks do completely fine with a big sponge filter, so it's going to be based on your needs.
 
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Jim1990

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gray_matter16 said:
Don't get a filter based on what the box says it's good for. Just because the filter box says it's for a 60 or 100 gallon tank, usually doesn't mean that's an appropriately rated filter for your sized tank. What's more important is the filter's gallon per hour (gph) rate. A number to shoot for is a filter with a flow rating that is 5-10x the size of your aquarium. So, for the 75 gallon's case, a good filter would be one that has a GPH between 375gph and 750gph. For a single canister filter that's a lot, so you might need to use multiple canisters, or a sump.

But it's also nuanced like all things. I have a 75 gallon heavily planted tank and mine does fine with 2 canisters that total 265gph, which is about 3.5x. I've also heard large tanks do completely fine with a big sponge filter, so it's going to be based on your needs.
Good to know!. The FX4 does 700 gallons per hour. Took me a min to find lol.
 

gray_matter16

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Jim1990 said:
Good to know!. The FX4 does 700 gallons per hour. Took me a min to find lol.
The other part of that is the filters advertise the highest possible rating. So it's common practice to cut whatever rating is on the box in half (should have mentioned that before). The two canisters I have are both rated at 265gph. Since I cut both of these in half, then total them, the grand total comes back to 265gph.

This is done because when testing to get the gph rating, companies will run the filters brand new out of the box, using no filter media, with completely clean water, with the tubing at a horizontal. This is totally unrealistic in normal aquarium setups where we pack our filters to the brim with media, have plant, food, and waste debris in the water, and normally have our canisters above or below our tanks (meaning it has to work against gravity). Not to mention normal wear and tear of using a mechanical product.

So your estimated gph for the FX4 would be 350gph, which I think, coupled with a moderate amount of live plants, will do just fine. As long as you're keeping up with normal aquarium maintenance (water changes weekly, filter cleanings monthly or bi-monthly, removing large pieces of waste, etc.)
 
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Jim1990

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gray_matter16 said:
The other part of that is the filters advertise the highest possible rating. So it's common practice to cut whatever rating is on the box in half (should have mentioned that before). The two canisters I have are both rated at 265gph. Since I cut both of these in half, then total them, the grand total comes back to 265gph.

This is done because when testing to get the gph rating, companies will run the filters brand new out of the box, using no filter media, with completely clean water, with the tubing at a horizontal. This is totally unrealistic in normal aquarium setups where we pack our filters to the brim with media, have plant, food, and waste debris in the water, and normally have our canisters above or below our tanks (meaning it has to work against gravity). Not to mention normal wear and tear of using a mechanical product.

So your estimated gph for the FX4 would be 350gph, which I think, coupled with a moderate amount of live plants, will do just fine. As long as you're keeping up with normal aquarium maintenance (water changes weekly, filter cleanings monthly or bi-monthly, removing large pieces of waste, etc.)
What about a sump set up? What is the best way of going about having a sump tank?
 

Islandvic

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Welcome to the forum!

If room and funds permit you getting a 125g, then go bigger the first time. It will give you a long more options long term.

We have a 75 gallon, and it was HUGE for a couple of months. Now it looks average sized. Ha. I don't have the room for a 6ft tank, but if you do, I suggest trying to make that happen.

You could easily add some non-abrasive South American cichlids to live happily with the Angelfish you want, such as some geophagus like Red Head Tapajos for example.

Asking what is the best way to set up a sump is a loaded question. You've got performance versus cost versus DIY ability versus all pre-assembled and ready to go. Depends on your threshold for each, although better performance doesnt have to mean more expensive if it's all properly planned out. After you pick your tank and you want to go with a sump, I suggest starting a new thread specifically for the sump build.

Easiset way to go about having a sump, is buy a tank that already is pre-drilled and has internal overflows built in. An Aqueon 125g with dual corner megaflows would be an example.

Next best option is to drill the tank's back glass for bulkheads and if thevoverflow box has 3 drains, run a "bean animal" style set up.

Last option, is to use a hang-on-back style overflow w/ an AquaLifter pump to ensure it's always primed. There are pre-made styles available and tons of DIY types on YouTube.

You can even run a sump + a canister if you want.

Either way you go, building your own stand is always optimal. That way, you can pre-plan your plumbing, electrical cord management and shelving.

As for pumps, look into DC type pumps, as opposed to AC type pumps.

Pumps that use low voltage DC are way more efficient, their output can be adjusted up or down with an included controller, and many have "Feed" mode where ot slows down the pump for 5-10 mins when its time to feed. Some even have wi-fi connectivity so they may be controlled through an app and monitored remotely. The better DC pumps have built in shut off safeguards if it detects no water running though the pump.

If you go with a sump, search YouTube and Google for "Dr. Novak anoxic biocenosis clarification baskets" or "Dr. Novak anoxic sump". It's an easy to make anoxic filter that uses a submerged basket(s) filled with 2 substrates that is designed to drastically reduce nitrates and phosphates.

With freshwater sumps, keep it simple without a ton of baffles.

For example, ive already sketched out a sump build, whenever I get around to adding one to our 75 gallon. I was going to have the water pass through some vertical sheets of progressively denser Poret foam from Swiss Tropicals (10ppi - 20ppi - 30ppi) , then go through a chamber with some Dr. Novak style biocenosis clarification baskets (BCB's) with your heater, then finally a chamber with the return pump.
 
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