75 Gallon Rebuild.

  1. boxtop Member Member

    So I am new to all this. I am still learning about the art of aquascaping and fish keeping. I inherited a 75G tank from a friend of my wife. After reading the thread KingD started about his 75G rehab I realized I need to take a closer look at what I was going to do with the new tank I have acquired.

    The tank is quite scratched but none are too deep. I believe I can buff them out. But I had never considered resealing the tank and on close inspection, the silicone in the corners of this tank is in terrible shape. There is next to none on the inside of the tank and the silicone in the seal is very brown and decayed looking. It makes me wonder how the thing even held water.

    So given all this I am left wondering, should I break this tank down into plate pieces and rebuild from the ground up? Would anyone else do that? Part of me wants to do just to see if i can since I have never done anything like it before.

    I bought a couple of different sized scraping tools and I am going to remove the top and bottom braces and start scraping this thing down. I will probably try and take it all to the way to plate pieces which would make buffing out the scratches easier.

    To reassemble, would I simply use silicone to bind all the pieces together and then reseal the inside joints? Should I do it all at once or should I let the bond cure before doing the inside? 1 week on the cure time? Any special way to reattach the braces or just silicone them in place?

    Any advise is appreciated.

    I will see if I can attach some pictures later this afternoon.

    Thanks all.
     
  2. DanB80TTS Well Known Member Member

    Breaking it down to the glass panes might be the best idea if the silicone is in that bad of shape. I've resealed up to 55g before and its really not hard at all but I have never broke it down to the pieces of glass.

    Is the effort worth not buying a new 75g? (not sure of the cost of a new 75g) One thing to bear in mind when resealing a tank though, if any part of it fails and you end up with a wet floor, it is 100% your fault. Depending how you look at it that could be a good thing or a bad thing.
     

  3. Shiloh Keller Initiate Member

    this is what i was thinking, you might be able to get a used one (in better shape) for cheap. but if you would enjoy the project, i say go for it! :^)

    i cant really help with advice about the actual project, but someone else can im sure.
     
  4. boxtop Member Member

    The tank has some sentimental value for my wife's friend. It belonged to her roommate who died. To be able to resurrect it and get it up and running would be a huge thing for my wife's friend to see.

    I am not scared of a project. I just need to figure out how to do it right so that I don't end up with 75 gallons of water on my floor.

    Thanks for the comments!