60g Tank Isn't Thriving

SLeroux
  • #1
I am about six months in on my planted tank and although there was definitely a learning curve, I think I have got the basics. Now I really do love this forum, it's great for inspo and learning along the way but I keep seeing all these posts about progress after a month or so and plants have a ton of growth and they make me so jealous! My current set up is definitely not the case, my java fern and anubias are doing well, new leaves quite often but that is about it. Could I be doing something wrong? Or do I need to add something to my regime?

A fellow planted tank hobbyist in my city sells a lot of plants as well as Macro and Micro pre-mixed liquid ferts as well as liquid CO2. He has a ton of planted tanks which he uses this on and they of course thrive. This is what I also use as it's much cheaper than Flourish but I just haven't seen results.

Since I have a moderately planted tank, I don't dose much. Maybe 3 pumps from the bottle once a week (on different days). I have attached his nutrient breakdown below. Any suggestions on how to improve things would be amazing.


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Fishlover832
  • #2
If it makes you feel any better, the plants in there look way healthier than mine. The scape isn't really my style but I'm a little confused how you don't think this is thriving. Can you elaborate please?
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #3
If it makes you feel any better, the plants in there look way healthier than mine. The scape isn't really my style but I'm a little confused how you don't think this is thriving. Can you elaborate please?
Sure! Basically the plants don't have that much growth over the time I have had them. I am again comparing to progress pictures over a month or two that I see and you can tell major growth has happened and it's been months here and I barely notice.
 
Fishlover832
  • #4
Well growth rate is determined by available nutrients, and the plant itself. This other hobbyist might be getting faster growth because he's using more light and nutrients (including co2). I would personally not change anything in your tank because it looks well balanced. If you really did want faster growth, try adding more of everything (light, co2, nutients). Even before doing that though, I would try adding some faster growing plants and see how you like them.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #5
Well growth rate is determined by available nutrients, and the plant itself. This other hobbyist might be getting faster growth because he's using more light and nutrients (including co2). I would personally not change anything in your tank because it looks well balanced. If you really did want faster growth, try adding more of everything (light, co2, nutients). Even before doing that though, I would try adding some faster growing plants and see how you like them.
Thanks! I'll look into that
 
_IceFyre_
  • #6
Java fern and anubias are known for being rather slow growing. If you’re looking for something that will fill up your tank more quickly, you might want to look into getting plants such as Ludwigia, hygrophila, vals, and Mexican oak leaf.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #7
Java fern and anubias are known for being rather slow growing. If you’re looking for something that will fill up your tank more quickly, you might want to look into getting plants such as Ludwigia, hygrophila, vals, and Mexican oak leaf.
Funny enough my Java fern and anubias seem to be growing the fastest rather than my rotala, bacopa and crypt.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #8
HI SLeroux

+1 that the java ferns and anubias will grow slowly. Looking at your stems of rotala and bacopa it appears that you changed your dosing somewhat recently.....when was that?
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #9
HI SLeroux

+1 that the java ferns and anubias will grow slowly. Looking at your stems of rotala and bacopa it appears that you changed your dosing somewhat recently.....when was that?
I started dosing macros on top of the micro 2 - 3 months back as my Bacopa and Amazon sword in particular we're really suffering. They bounced back from that quickly but have taken a bad turn again. I actually just had another thread on here where I had asked if my amano shrimp were eating my 'healthy' plants as there were little holes in the leaves. Turns out I think my dosing is off, low on potassium. So on top of my macro and micro I think I will add seachum potassium as well. Although any other insight you can provide would be great!
 
SeattleRoy
  • #10
HI SLeroux

Do you test any of your water parameters? pH, dKH, dGH, or ppm of NO3
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #11
PH yes, sits at about an 7.8 to 8, the colour is hard to tell but it's consistent. Nitrate at a consistent 20 so I got pothos to try to help with that. I haven't tested my GH in a while, last was when I added my amano shrimp to make sure it was at an optimal range for them to molt and it was right on the money from what I read but can't remember the actual reading, I could check again. Not sure on KH though, could also test for that tomorrow! What would I be looking for with those two specifically with this problem?
 
SeattleRoy
  • #12
HI SLeroux

Actually 20 ppm of NO3 is a good number for nitrates, I only take corrective action when it gets to 40ppm.

The high pH could be inhibiting the uptake of iron, depending upon what type of iron is used in the fertilizer you are using. Many fertilizers use EDTA chelated iron because it is less expensive than other types, unfortunately it becomes insoluble at a pH of about 7.2 or higher. The hardness, and specifically the dGH which provides information on the total amount of divalent (+2) nutrients (such as calcium and magnesium). Calcium is not often thought of as a 'macro nutrient' however it is long been known as a factor effecting plant growth because it is necessary for the formation of cells.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #13
HI SLeroux

Actually 20 ppm of NO3 is a good number for nitrates, I only take corrective action when it gets to 40ppm.

The high pH could be inhibiting the uptake of iron, depending upon what type of iron is used in the fertilizer you are using. Many fertilizers use EDTA chelated iron because it is less expensive than other types, unfortunately it becomes insoluble at a pH of about 7.2 or higher. The hardness, and specifically the dGH which provides information on the total amount of divalent (+2) nutrients (such as calcium and magnesium). Calcium is not often thought of as a 'macro nutrient' however it is long been known as a factor effecting plant growth because it is necessary for the formation of cells.
Apologies for the delay! This weekend was busier than expected. I did a full water test this morning before water change to see what it is like after a week. Below are my results. Do you think I am at a 20 or 40ppm for NO3? It's hard to see in the picture depending on your screen colours but it doesn't look as red as 40 but doesn't look as orange as 20.

Do these reading have anything to do with my plant deficiencies?

PH - 8
Ammonia - 0
Nitrite - 0
Nitrate - 20 - 40
GH - 100 - 200 ppm (10 drops)
KH - 100 - 200 ppm (7 drops)


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SeattleRoy
  • #14
HI SLeroux

The readings help a lot, thank you. Your NO3 ppm looks like about 30ppm.

Here are three pictures of plants from your tank (I downloaded your big picture, cropped, enlarged, and adjusted so the resolution is a little 'fuzzy')

First the Banana Plant (Nymphoides sp) from the left side

29881943848_bff52c475a_b.jpg
Do you see the lighter leaf veins surrounded by darker interveinal leaf material? Typically this is a symptom of a sulfur deficiency.

This is a picture of the Anubias (?) from the right side of your tank

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Do you notice the upper leaf on the anubias (just left of center) how the veins look darker than the remainder of the leaf? That is called interveinal chlorosis and is a symptom of insufficient iron if it occurs in newer leaves or a magnesium deficiency if that is one of the older leaves on the plant. IS THAT A NEWER LEAF OR AN OLDER LEAF? There are also some signs of leaf 'puckering'.

Last the anubias (?) in the center of the tank with leaves of a cryptocoryne (?) coming in from the right

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The anubias leaves show 'puckering' and the bottom anubias leaf appears to be showing signs of necrosis (dead tissue) forming (the dark areas). The cryptocoryne leaves seem to be curling along the leaf margins. The 'puckering' and margin curling could be a symptom of a magnesium deficiency.

Can you tell me if the leaf in center picture that I mentioned is an older leaf or a newer leaf?

Also, it would be helpful to know where you live (i.e. city) so I can check the local water utility and see if they do detailed water analysis.
-Roy
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #15
HI SLeroux

The readings help a lot, thank you. Your NO3 ppm looks like about 30ppm.

Here are three pictures of plants from your tank (I downloaded your big picture, cropped, enlarged, and adjusted so the resolution is a little 'fuzzy')

First the Banana Plant (Nymphoides sp) from the left side
View attachment 461626
Do you see the lighter leaf veins surrounded by darker interveinal leaf material? Typically this is a symptom of a sulfur deficiency.

This is a picture of the Anubias (?) from the right side of your tank
View attachment 461627
Do you notice the upper leaf on the anubias (just left of center) how the veins look darker than the remainder of the leaf? That is called interveinal chlorosis and is a symptom of insufficient iron if it occurs in newer leaves or a magnesium deficiency if that is one of the older leaves on the plant. IS THAT A NEWER LEAF OR AN OLDER LEAF? There are also some signs of leaf 'puckering'.

Last the anubias (?) in the center of the tank with leaves of a cryptocoryne (?) coming in from the right
View attachment 461628
The anubias leaves show 'puckering' and the bottom anubias leaf appears to be showing signs of necrosis (dead tissue) forming (the dark areas). The cryptocoryne leaves seem to be curling along the leaf margins. The 'puckering' and margin curling could be a symptom of a magnesium deficiency.

Can you tell me if the leaf in center picture that I mentioned is an older leaf or a newer leaf?

Also, it would be helpful to know where you live (i.e. city) so I can check the local water utility and see if they do detailed water analysis.
-Roy
Wow you're amazing! Thank you so much.

The two anubias (you were right) plants you mentioned are new to me so I'll do my best to answer your questions. When they came to me they were covered in black algae. I did a bleach dip with good success. The first picture, the brighter green leaf second from the right is new but the rest are old (before I owned it).

Second picture, there is still some grey (dead) algae on the bottom leaves so I think that's what your seeing but I'll take a look at the next water change and trim if not. The leaf in the centre from the crypt is old and has a few pin holes in it so I trimmed it during the water change this morning.

Based on the potassium, sulfur, iron and magnesium deficiency, should I increase my macros dosing overall?

I live in Toronto, Ontario Canada. Let me know if you need more specific than that. I really, really appreciate your help.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #17
HI SLeroux,

Thank you that water report does help.

Here is what I would suggest:

Add Seachem Equilibrium to your dosing schedule. Do an initial dose of 1 teaspoon per 10 gallons. Thereafter, when you do a water change add 1 teaspoon per 10 gallons of new water added.

Add Seachem Flourish Iron to your dosing schedule. Let's start with 1/8 teaspoon per 10 gallons once a week. Continue dosing the CSM+B as you have been.

Now the hard part..........wait two weeks. Continue everything else that you have been doing exactly as you have been, just make the two changes above. Watch the new leaves as they are formed (do not watch the existing leaves, they will change very little and may continue to go downhill). Do the new leaves look greener, maybe a little larger, have the stem plants started growing faster? If so we are on the correct path. Keep us posted and let us know how things go.

The Seachem Equilibrium will add calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sulfur (along with a little manganese) to your tank. The Seachem Flourish Iron is made from Ferrous gluconate which is much easier for plants to absorb and utilize when the pH of water is above 7.2. Hope this helps! -Roy
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #18
HI SLeroux,

Thank you that water report does help.

Here is what I would suggest:

Add Seachem Equilibrium to your dosing schedule. Do an initial dose of 1 teaspoon per 10 gallons. Thereafter, when you do a water change add 1 teaspoon per 10 gallons of new water added.

Add Seachem Flourish Iron to your dosing schedule. Let's start with 1/8 teaspoon per 10 gallons once a week. Continue dosing the CSM+B as you have been.

Now the hard part..........wait two weeks. Continue everything else that you have been doing exactly as you have been, just make the two changes above. Watch the new leaves as they are formed (do not watch the existing leaves, they will change very little and may continue to go downhill). Do the new leaves look greener, maybe a little larger, have the stem plants started growing faster? If so we are on the correct path. Keep us posted and let us know how things go.

The Seachem Equilibrium will add calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sulfur (along with a little manganese) to your tank. The Seachem Flourish Iron is made from Ferrous gluconate which is much easier for plants to absorb and utilize when the pH of water is above 7.2. Hope this helps! -Roy
I'm so sorry I forgot to respond! You have been so much help, I can't thank you enough. My equilibrium arrived in the mail today, just added it to the tank and will be picking up iron tomorrow. Will update here once the two weeks are up! Very excited to have everything in balanace.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #19
HI SLeroux,

Thank you that water report does help.

Here is what I would suggest:

Add Seachem Equilibrium to your dosing schedule. Do an initial dose of 1 teaspoon per 10 gallons. Thereafter, when you do a water change add 1 teaspoon per 10 gallons of new water added.

Add Seachem Flourish Iron to your dosing schedule. Let's start with 1/8 teaspoon per 10 gallons once a week. Continue dosing the CSM+B as you have been.

Now the hard part..........wait two weeks. Continue everything else that you have been doing exactly as you have been, just make the two changes above. Watch the new leaves as they are formed (do not watch the existing leaves, they will change very little and may continue to go downhill). Do the new leaves look greener, maybe a little larger, have the stem plants started growing faster? If so we are on the correct path. Keep us posted and let us know how things go.

The Seachem Equilibrium will add calcium, magnesium, potassium, and sulfur (along with a little manganese) to your tank. The Seachem Flourish Iron is made from Ferrous gluconate which is much easier for plants to absorb and utilize when the pH of water is above 7.2. Hope this helps! -Roy
One quick question, should I keep dosing the macro as well as the micro for the two weeks? I know you mentioned to stick with the CSM+B but was curious if the equalibrium would replace the macro for the time being?
 
SeattleRoy
  • #20
HI SLeroux,

Continue to dose both macro and micro nutrients as you have in the past; the only change is the addition of Seachem Equilibrium to the dosing routine. Keep us updated as things progress!

-Roy
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #21
HI SLeroux,

Continue to dose both macro and micro nutrients as you have in the past; the only change is the addition of Seachem Equilibrium to the dosing routine. Keep us updated as things progress!

-Roy
HI Roy!

Wanted to give you a bit of an update on the tank. Some plants like the bacopa and some of the rotala seem to be doing a bit better.

The banana plant isn't doing so hot, each new leaf doesn't survive and I have to trim it. Some of the Java fern is also dying but the new growth looks healthy. My Amazon swords haven't grown much at all.

Should I alter anything?


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SeattleRoy
  • #22
HI @SLeroux,

Looking at your pictures I would say your new growth is doing 'substantially' better....not just a bit better. In your first picture the new Rotala leaves look much healthier and I see healthy side shoots coming off the stems. Bacopa is a slower grower than Rotala but the new leaves look healthier there as well without the 'leaf hook' at the tips which would indicate a need for more calcium. Also the new leaves on the Alternanthera reineckiI looks much healthier and no 'hooking' at the leaf tips of the new leaves there either. As for the Banana Plant (Nymphoides aquatica) it should have shown improvement, Seachem Equilibrium contains sufficient sulfate that the plant should have responded. Please post a picture when you get a chance. Amazon Swords seem to do best after their root system is fully established; if they do not respond in the next couple of weeks we may look at supplementing your dosing with Seachem Flourish Tabs but lets see what happens first.

I usually indicate in my suggesting for changing nutrient dosing that 'existing leaves will not change and may continue to go downhill' but to watch the new leaves for signs of improvement so don't worry about the older leaves. I would not make any changes at this time and just continue your current dosing levels; I think you will be happy with the results.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #23
HI @SLeroux,

Looking at your pictures I would say your new growth is doing 'substantially' better....not just a bit better. In your first picture the new Rotala leaves look much healthier and I see healthy side shoots coming off the stems. Bacopa is a slower grower than Rotala but the new leaves look healthier there as well without the 'leaf hook' at the tips which would indicate a need for more calcium. Also the new leaves on the Alternanthera reineckiI looks much healthier and no 'hooking' at the leaf tips of the new leaves there either. As for the Banana Plant (Nymphoides aquatica) it should have shown improvement, Seachem Equilibrium contains sufficient sulfate that the plant should have responded. Please post a picture when you get a chance. Amazon Swords seem to do best after their root system is fully established; if they do not respond in the next couple of weeks we may look at supplementing your dosing with Seachem Flourish Tabs but lets see what happens first.

I usually indicate in my suggesting for changing nutrient dosing that 'existing leaves will not change and may continue to go downhill' but to watch the new leaves for signs of improvement so don't worry about the older leaves. I would not make any changes at this time and just continue your current dosing levels; I think you will be happy with the results.
Thanks so much for the detailed response! I will keep up this schedule and hope the swords catch up.

For the banana plant, I was trying to wait until the new leaf opened but it's taking forever so here it is. The leaf is almost transparent and dies very quickly after opening so I then cut it off. Happens about once every week/week and a half.


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SeattleRoy
  • #24
HI @SLeroux,


img_20180823_202929-jpg.jpg

Based upon your pictures we are on the right track but not totally done. The picture above is excellent, thank you! On the Nymphoides do you see how 'clear' the new leaf looks, almost "gelatinous" and I bet it is pretty much finished unfolding. That "gelatinous" is a classic symptom of a calcium deficiency. I grow a 'cousin' of Nymphoides aquatica - Nymphoides hygrophylla (aka sp. 'Taiwan') and it does exactly what you leaf above is doing when my calcium level has gotten low. I wanted to start dosing the Equilibrium slowly so as not to distress any fish or shrimp so my suggested dosing was what I would expect to be the 'minimum'. Based upon the photo above we are not quite there yet, even though most of the other species have responded and are doing better. Keep in mind each plant species evolved in different environments; some in hard water some in soft water. Nymphoides aquatica is native to the southeastern United States from Texas to Maryland so it evolved where calcium in the water supply is abundant.

Please add one half teaspoon (1/2 tsp) more of Equilibrium per 10 gallons to your tank now. Then at water changes change the Equilibrium dosing from 1 teaspoon per 10 gallons of new water added to 1-1/2 teaspoons of Equilibrium per 10 gallons of new water added. The leaf above will likely not change much, if at all. However, with the additional calcium the next leaf or two should look much better. Keep us posted!

Symptoms appearing first or most severely on new growth (root and shoot tips, new leaves

A. Terminal bud usually dies. Symptoms on new growth.

2. Necrosis occurs at tip and margin of leaves causing a definite hook at leaf tip.

Calcium is essential for the growth of shoot and root tips (meristems). Growing point dies. Margins of young leaves are scalloped and abnormally green and, due to inhibition of cell wall formation, the leaf tips may be "gelatinous" and stuck together inhibiting leaf unfolding. Stem structure is weak and peduncle collapse or stem topple may occur. Roots are stunted. Downward curl of leaf tips (hooking) occurs near terminal bud. ammonium or magnesium excess may induce a calcium deficiency in plants... calcium deficiency

Differentiating between calcium and boron deficiency symptoms: When calcium is deficient, there is a characteristic hooking of the youngest leaf tips. However, when boron is deficient, the breakdown occurs at the bases of the youngest leaves. Death of the terminal growing points is the final result in both cases.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #25
This is great!! Gelatinous is a great way to describe that leaf. Thank you will top up the equilibrium tomorrow and then increase the ration for my water change Sunday.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #26
HI @SLeroux,

If increasing the Equilibrium further does not resolve the problem we may have to look at other remedies.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #27
HI @SLeroux,

If increasing the Equilibrium further does not resolve the problem we may have to look at other remedies.
HI Roy! I was testing my GH and KH now that I've increased the Equilibrium and noticed my GH has gone up a bit and my KH has come down. Is this normal? Just want to be sure.

GH is now at 12 drops or about 200ppm and KH is now at about 100ppm. Hoping that's ok for my shrimp as they've been acting a bit weird lately.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #28
HI SLeroux,

Increase dKH will increase dGH because dKH is calcium carbonate however increasing dGH by using Equilibrium will not increase dKH because Equilibrium contains no carbonates. Shrimp will act 'weird' for many reasons, one of the most common I remember was when weather changes occurred and the barometer increased or decreased substantially. Had some weather changes lately?
 
Vince00
  • #29
HI SLeroux,

Increase dKH will increase dGH because dKH is calcium carbonate however increasing dGH by using Equilibrium will not increase dKH because Equilibrium contains no carbonates. Shrimp will act 'weird' for many reasons, one of the most common I remember was when weather changes occurred and the barometer increased or decreased substantially. Had some weather changes lately?

Just wanted to say I've been following this thread and impressed with all your knowledge, I'm in a similar situation and gathering all my water readings (just waiting for a few more test strips) once I have them and make a post I hope your ok if I tag you in it.

Thank you
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #30
HI SLeroux,

Increase dKH will increase dGH because dKH is calcium carbonate however increasing dGH by using Equilibrium will not increase dKH because Equilibrium contains no carbonates. Shrimp will act 'weird' for many reasons, one of the most common I remember was when weather changes occurred and the barometer increased or decreased substantially. Had some weather changes lately?
We had a heat wave yesterday so maybe that's it! Appreciate your fast response and echo the comment about all the info and help you've provided! Thank you
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #31
HI SLeroux,

Increase dKH will increase dGH because dKH is calcium carbonate however increasing dGH by using Equilibrium will not increase dKH because Equilibrium contains no carbonates. Shrimp will act 'weird' for many reasons, one of the most common I remember was when weather changes occurred and the barometer increased or decreased substantially. Had some weather changes lately?
Hey SeattleRoy!

Wanted to give a little bit if an update. Most plants are doing amazingly. I have noticed some real growth on my rotala and bacopa. Even my crinum calamistratum has taken off in inert soil because of the flourish tabs.

I just have a couple developments I would love your opinion on. My Java ferns seem to get brown/black markings on the older leaves. Wonder if that is a deficiency? Also you can see in one picture two leaves have turned a white/yellow with brown spots.


My swords are also a big question mark. The standard green one I have has grown but still has lines through the really elongated leaves. My red sword has had little growth but the leaves look a healthier shape. Both are now near two flourish tabs each but not much effect.

My banana plant also seems like it's toast. Since we started talking it hasn't sprouted a healthy leaf and since the last week and a bit has stopped sprouting leaves at all.

I was wondering if switching to powdered ferts with EI dosing might be the logical next step? Let me know!


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PonzLL
  • #32
I wish my java fern looked that good haha
 
SeattleRoy
  • #33
HI SLeroux,

Thank you for the update! (expand the quote below to see my responses)

Hey SeattleRoy!

Wanted to give a little bit if an update. Most plants are doing amazingly. I have noticed some real growth on my rotala and bacopa. Even my crinum calamistratum has taken off in inert soil because of the flourish tabs.

I agree, overall the tank is looking much better!

I just have a couple developments I would love your opinion on. My Java ferns seem to get brown/black markings on the older leaves. Wonder if that is a deficiency? Also you can see in one picture two leaves have turned a white/yellow with brown spots.

Remember, I said that the older leaves would not improve and if sufficiently damaged may continue to go downhill

My swords are also a big question mark. The standard green one I have has grown but still has lines through the really elongated leaves. My red sword has had little growth but the leaves look a healthier shape. Both are now near two flourish tabs each but not much effec

The green sword looks good, the veins are a little light colored but lets see how things go over the next several weeks. The red sword looks really good. Swords can take some time to respond to changes; my opinion is first the plant works on establishing the root system (which we can't see and then the leaves start emerging

My banana plant also seems like it's toast. Since we started talking it hasn't sprouted a healthy leaf and since the last week and a bit has stopped sprouting leaves at all.

If I recall correctly we are dosing the Seachem at 1/8 teaspoon per 10 gallons once a week; let's increase that to 1/8 teaspoon twice a week (but not at the same time as any fertilizers that contain phosphorus)

I was wondering if switching to powdered ferts with EI dosing might be the logical next step? Let me know!

Yes, it will be less expensive to change over to dry ferts but let's get the tank growing well first. When it is growing well then we can determine the ppm's of the various nutrients based upon the dosing levels of what you are currently doing.
 
Fishnite
  • #34
Great thread, thanks Seattle Roy for all the knowledge you’ve shared, so helpful to see such specific advice and thanks OP for all the follow ups.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #35
HI SLeroux,

Thank you for the update! (expand the quote below to see my responses)
Thank you so much! And for being so patient with me. Will increase iron as you mentioned and update you in a few weeks.
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #36
Hey SeattleRoy! Me again

I just noticed my Bacopa has last almost all it's leaves on the lower half of the stem. Should I prune the healthy top and replant and remove the bare stem?

Notices other are starting the same thing so wondering if I should try and replant them too?
IMG_20180923_175146.jpg
 
SeattleRoy
  • #37
HI SLeroux

Yes, I agree. The older leaves that were weakened prior to the changes you have made have served their purpose, they hung around long enough and provided sufficient nutrients and strength to the plant so it could put out the 'new and improved' (lol) growth you have now. I would cut off the healthy tops, remove the old stems, and plant the healthy tops and see how they do.

What are your thoughts about how things are progressing?
 
PonzLL
  • #38
Not to derail or anything, but I have those same plants in my tank, and they did the same thing, and your reasoning makes perfect sense. This is a helpful topic for all of us!
 
SLeroux
  • Thread Starter
  • #39
HI SLeroux

Yes, I agree. The older leaves that were weakened prior to the changes you have made have served their purpose, they hung around long enough and provided sufficient nutrients and strength to the plant so it could put out the 'new and improved' (lol) growth you have now. I would cut off the healthy tops, remove the old stems, and plant the healthy tops and see how they do.

What are your thoughts about how things are progressing?
I think things are progressing well! Getting some good height on things which is great. Tank seems balanced and less algae. I'd love to still fill things out a bit more. Get the back filled out and reach the top of the tank.

Still curious what dry ferts would do, especially in a low tech set up.
 
SeattleRoy
  • #40
HI SLeroux

I think after the stem tops that you plant grow out a bit (4" or so) you will be able to trim the tops again. But this time leave the original stems in place (they should branch and send out more stems) and plant the stem tops to give you a more dense plant thicket.

I forget, do you currently have dry ferts and if so which ones? Ideally you would want potassium nitrate (KNO3), potassium sulfate (K2SO4), mono potassium phosphate (KH2PO4), and Plantex CSM with boron added by the sell to make CSM+B. I have dosed dry ferts in my low tech tank for years.
 

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