5 Gallon Paludarium Stocking

Sauceboat

Hello! So I’ve recently gotten into paludariums, I’ve built a few miniature ones that are too small for ever a single red cherry shrimp but I have an interest in making a bigger one. However, I only have space for a 5 gallon maximum because I’m shutting down a 5 gallon aquascape to be moved to my mom’s classroom as a class pet (only shrimp). So I’d like to set up a Paludarium/Riparium in that area. My question is whether or not I could have fish or amphibians in the small space. I’m assuming there’d be 2.5 gallons of water half filled, probably 2 gallons with all the rock and wood for the earth part. I could make it a shrimp tank but I already have a few of those and I think I’d rather have fish if possible. Any thoughts as to if stocking this build would be possible?
 

Ghelfaire

What about a crab? They're cute and fun to watch. They'll use both the water and land.
 

Joshaeus

Some small killifish may be OK in that setup - killifish keepers regularly keep pairs of small killifish species in such small setups. Smaller Rivulus species (some species can hit 4-6 inches, and obviously those would not be too happy in there) in particular would have no trouble in such a setup (I remember reading somewhere online of an aquarium keeper whose Rivulus leaped out of their tank into a puddle on his concrete floor that did not even cover their bodies...not only did they survive but they bred there, in spite of only receiving baby brine shrimp accidentally dripped onto the floor. Not to say you should keep any fish like that...just saying the things are tough). Heterandria formosa and Leptolucania ommata (a livebearer and a killifish from Florida, respectively) have both been successfully kept in breeding colonies for multiple generations in 2.5 gallon tanks; a pair or trio of pygmy sunfishes (Elassoma sp.) would also work, but they are more territorial than the above two fishes and - if a colony developed - only a single male would likely show the black and blue colors for which they are famous. Pygmy sunfishes will need live food, at least at first (they often, but not always, transition to frozen foods); L. ommata is also somewhat picky but will often take high quality dry foods, while H. formosa will eat anything and are amongst the easiest fishes in the hobby.
 

Similar Aquarium Threads

Replies
1
Views
261
richiep
Replies
2
Views
192
AquaticQueen
Replies
4
Views
327
Ipman37
Replies
13
Views
4K
Ihaveacactus
Replies
12
Views
967
NikkiHill0509

New Aquarium Build Threads

Latest Aquarium Threads

Top Bottom