How Do I 40g Saltwater Setup

  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #21

TheGouramiGuy

New Member
Messages
47
Reaction score
9
Points
8
Just me but a sump of 20 gallons or more is really recommended as is a pre-drilled tank if you go with a sump. To me a 10 gallon sump doesn't provide enough extra flow to be worth the effort, nor does it offer enough room for decent equipment (ie good skimmer and return pump, which are generally larger in size), furthermore it's super cramped for equipment when you need to work on it/clean it. I have a 29 gallon sump on my 90 gallon and definitely wish I had a 40 breeder for a sump on it. As mentioned above, the other issue is that if the tank isn't drilled you will be likely be looking at an overflow box which can be a pain as their siphons can become clogged and are more prone to overflow issues. With a predrilled tank the sump is as simple as the plumbing, a filter sock (if you chose to use one) a return pump and the skimmer. Honestly if it were me, I would actually bump it up to a pre-drilled 75 gallon tank as it will give you more useable space for your fish and open up your stocking options considerably. 55 gallon tanks are good for length but are too skinny on the width for many fish.
My bad about the forum topic, I had decided on going down to a 40g to make it easier to light the tank, and for the rock placement, etc. I believe sumps are supposed to be 10% of the volume at minimum, so I think when I measure everything out, I'll make sure to get the sump last, and to adjust what size sump based on how much room everything else takes up.
 

Jesterrace

Well Known Member
Messages
2,904
Reaction score
1,102
Points
198
Experience
1 year
My bad about the forum topic, I had decided on going down to a 40g to make it easier to light the tank, and for the rock placement, etc. I believe sumps are supposed to be 10% of the volume at minimum, so I think when I measure everything out, I'll make sure to get the sump last, and to adjust what size sump based on how much room everything else takes up.
As mentioned though, sumps are best suited for pre-drilled tanks, so it's not something to simply add later. It's best to either go sump from the get go or HOB. If you want a refugium there are many folks who mod their Fluval HOBs into fuge's so that could be a route to go. Personally with a 40 gallon I would go sumpless and maybe just get something like an HOB skimmer (ie the Eshoppes PSK-75H, I only recommended the 100H because I thought you were talking about a 55 gallon). Or you could simply go without a skimmer and go light on the feeding and more regular with the water changes. The 40 breeder does give you quite a bit of flexibility with what you can do.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #25

TheGouramiGuy

New Member
Messages
47
Reaction score
9
Points
8
My bad, by getting the sump last, I meant physically getting all of the pumps and skimmers and whatnot first, then laying them out and measuring them to decide on what size sump I would need, then to get the tank for the sump and set it all up to start cycling.

Also, I went over the sump idea with my dad (who has a 55g freshwater with a sump and inline UV sterilizers, heaters, the whole gig.) He drilled his tank himself and siliconed his overflow into place, and he said that he would be happy to do it with my tank. Turns out, he used to do lots of saltwater tanks years and years ago. He had a bunch of different reverse osmosis setups, the whole deal really. He knows all about topics such as properly dosing reefs, so I can always refer to him for some local help if need be. He also said that he would be happy to grab some acrylic and help silicone all of my sump's different sections. The reason I plan on sticking with using a sump, is so that I can do in-line UV sterilization and an inline heater along with the normal sump filtration media, refugium, and protein skimmer all in one giant ultimate filter setup.

This is definitely going to be on the pricey side, but I feel that it will definitely help with minimizing maintenance, and making my tank's water great. With this setup, I also may consider doing a 45g or 50g instead, depending on how I like the tank's measurements. I saw a few pics and the 45g looked pretty tall, which might be a concern as far as finding better lights to penetrate deeper into the water, but I'm not 100% sure on that topic. The 50g also looked a little thin, which would affect how I can place the rocks. Let me know if any of you have experience with 45g/50g tanks, and tell me how they worked out for you as far as lighting, rock placement, room for the fish to swim, etc.

Thanks!
 

McRib

Valued Member
Messages
105
Reaction score
82
Points
38
I’m sure you already knew this, but make sure you get a tank that isn’t made with tempered glass (at least the panel that you’ll be drilling), otherwise you’ll just end up with a lot of little pieces of glass.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #27

TheGouramiGuy

New Member
Messages
47
Reaction score
9
Points
8
Definitely, I'll be double checking everything through research and my dad before ordering it. Thanks for the tip!
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom