40g Breeder Sw Stocking Ideas

Mbross325

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In November I decided to take a break from fish keeping since I was gonna be finishing college this year, my associates degree will arrive in August and after that I hope to get a good paying job, a good apartment and a better car. This is when I’ll truly have the freedom to do whatever I want, and lately I’ve been wanting to start my first saltwater tank. My dad had saltwater tanks most of his life, and my younger brother already started a 20gallon saltwater tank himself. The 40gallon breeder is currently under my brother’s care, I let him use it since it was sitting empty at the time but it has lots of Java fern, a pair of amazon sword, several driftwood pieces, and some cherry shrimps. At one point it was a saltwater tank but it was too much work for my little brother so he transferred everything to the current 20 gallon he has now.

This is what I was thinking:
-A pair of Ocellaris clownfish
-Three green chromis
-A pair of cleaner shrimp
-A watchman goby
-A six line wrasse

I wanted to do a pair of maroon clownfish but my research showed me that those kind tend to want the tank to themselves, and also a yellowtail damselfish. Anything else I could possibly add? Besides the pair of cleaner shrimp, what would my CUC look like?
 

Jesterrace

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Mbross325 said:
In November I decided to take a break from fish keeping since I was gonna be finishing college this year, my associates degree will arrive in August and after that I hope to get a good paying job, a good apartment and a better car. This is when I’ll truly have the freedom to do whatever I want, and lately I’ve been wanting to start my first saltwater tank. My dad had saltwater tanks most of his life, and my younger brother already started a 20gallon saltwater tank himself. The 40gallon breeder is currently under my brother’s care, I let him use it since it was sitting empty at the time but it has lots of Java fern, a pair of amazon sword, several driftwood pieces, and some cherry shrimps. At one point it was a saltwater tank but it was too much work for my little brother so he transferred everything to the current 20 gallon he has now.

This is what I was thinking:
-A pair of Ocellaris clownfish
-Three green chromis
-A pair of cleaner shrimp
-A watchman goby
-A six line wrasse

I wanted to do a pair of maroon clownfish but my research showed me that those kind tend to want the tank to themselves, and also a yellowtail damselfish. Anything else I could possibly add? Besides the pair of cleaner shrimp, what would my CUC look like?
Skip the following fish:

Damselfish
Maroon, Cinnamon, Tomato, or anything but an Occ or Percula Variety Clownfish
6 line wrasse (Beautiful fish but so many reports of them turning into unholy terrors that literally destroy everything in the tank and many reports are from people with 100+ gallon tanks)
Chromis (some people have good luck with them but many have the Chromis kill each other off and there is a real problem these days with them shipping with diseases)
I would stick to one cleaner shrimp. I have just one in my 90 gallon and it is plenty

Instead I would look at one or more of the following:

Royal Gramma Basslet
Captive Bred Orchid Dottyback (not to be confused with the Purple Dottyback)
A bit of a stretch if you want coral, but you could try a Pygmy Angel (aka Cheubfish) that could work and definitely would give you something more unique than you find in a standard tank:
 
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Mbross325

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Jesterrace said:
Skip the following fish:

Damselfish
Maroon, Cinnamon, Tomato, or anything but an Occ or Percula Variety Clownfish
6 line wrasse (Beautiful fish but so many reports of them turning into unholy terrors that literally destroy everything in the tank and many reports are from people with 100+ gallon tanks)
Chromis (some people have good luck with them but many have the Chromis kill each other off and there is a real problem these days with them shipping with diseases)
I would stick to one cleaner shrimp. I have just one in my 90 gallon and it is plenty

Instead I would look at one or more of the following:

Royal Gramma Basslet
Captive Bred Orchid Dottyback (not to be confused with the Purple Dottyback)
A bit of a stretch if you want coral, but you could try a Pygmy Angel (aka Cheubfish) that could work and definitely would give you something more unique than you find in a standard tank:
Thanks, I’m well aware of green chromis killing each other and generally not surviving for long. As for the six line wrasse, I was looking for colorful fish that had different colors than the ones I had on the list. For example, a tank that has two orange and white fish, a yellow fish, a red and white shrimp, a purple fish, a blue/green fish, etc.

Would the cherub angelfish be fine in the 40 gallon breeder? The minimum tank size listed is 55 gallons

Is there such a thing as a dwarf flame angelfish? My little brother claimed he bought one but I didn’t really believe him. What other fish would be perfect for the 40 gallon breeder?

What kind of cleanup crew should I get? I don’t plan on having any corals or anemones for at least a year after the tank is cycled.
 
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Mbross325

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Here’s my new stocking list:

-Pair of ocellaris clownfish
-Cleaner shrimp
-Brittle star
-Yellow watchman goby
-Orchid dottyback
-Chalk basslet

Then I would like to set up a 10 gallon refugium that will house a tisbe copepod colony so I could get a green mandarin in the future.

Are the goby, dottyback and the chalk basslet compatible with each other or no?
 

Jesterrace

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Only time will tell for sure on the compatibility. As for the mandarin, they really need a tank that can handle about 75lbs of live rock with a thriving copepod population (been established for many months/years). Simply breeding pods in a 10 gallon tank will not be enough to keep up with a mandy. It is estimated that a single mandarin goes through roughly 5000 pods in a week and the pods tank about a month to breed as I recall. They constantly feed as they have a very short intestinal track (about the only time they don't is when they sleep at night) . Take it from a guy who had one die in less than 3 months despite spending $250 or more on pods, teaching it to eat frozen mysis, frozen reef frenzy and even target feeding it. Mandarins are very slow methodical eaters and other fish beat them to the punch for food.

As for the cherubfish it should be fine in a 40 gallon with the breeder dimensions (often times it is the horizontal length that is most important for fish to swim). As for the Flame Dwarf Angel? He is either referring to the Flame Angel (Dwarf Angel that maxes out about 4 inches in length):


Or he is referring to the Flameback Pygmy Angel (Pygmy Angel maxes out about 3 inches in length)


In both cases the fish are pretty but are generally more aggressive (I had to remove the Flame Angel above for aggression and coral nipping). The Pygmy Angels tend to be less prone to coral nipping.
 
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Mbross325

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Jesterrace said:
Only time will tell for sure on the compatibility. As for the mandarin, they really need a tank that can handle about 75lbs of live rock with a thriving copepod population (been established for many months/years). Simply breeding pods in a 10 gallon tank will not be enough to keep up with a mandy. It is estimated that a single mandarin goes through roughly 5000 pods in a week and the pods tank about a month to breed as I recall. They constantly feed as they have a very short intestinal track (about the only time they don't is when they sleep at night) . Take it from a guy who had one die in less than 3 months despite spending $250 or more on pods, teaching it to eat frozen mysis, frozen reef frenzy and even target feeding it. Mandarins are very slow methodical eaters and other fish beat them to the punch for food.

As for the cherubfish it should be fine in a 40 gallon with the breeder dimensions (often times it is the horizontal length that is most important for fish to swim). As for the Flame Dwarf Angel? He is either referring to the Flame Angel (Dwarf Angel that maxes out about 4 inches in length):


Or he is referring to the Flameback Pygmy Angel (Pygmy Angel maxes out about 3 inches in length)


In both cases the fish are pretty but are generally more aggressive (I had to remove the Flame Angel above for aggression and coral nipping). The Pygmy Angels tend to be less prone to coral nipping.
Thanks, I’ve decided not to get any angelfish. I’m hoping to succeed where my dad and younger brother failed, which is keeping a green mandarin. I loved seeing one in their tanks but they didn’t last long. So, I hope to establish a copepod colony and wait a year before I attempt to keep a green mandarin.

I’m just not sure about the chalk basslet so I think between the orchid dottyback and the yellow watchman goby that it’s too much of a risk to add a chalk basslet with those two.

Anybody have experience with a small brittle star and/or emerald crabs?
 

Jesterrace

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The problem is that it would be virtually impossible to get enough rock in your 40 to sustain them. IMHO a Mandy needs 75lbs of rock with a well established copepod population to support them. They feed non-stop other than when they sleep because their intestinal tract is super tiny. It is estimated that a single mandarin will consume 5000 pods in a week. It is possible that it will learn to eat frozen foods (mine did), but even then it's tough to keep them fed as other fish beat them to the punch since they take about 5 steps to lock onto and consume a piece of food that is only an inch or two from it's face where other fish zip in and gobble it up. Imagine an underwater hummingbird in slow motion and that is a Mandarin to a tee. This explains the difficulty of keeping a Mandarinfish:


Here is the one I had in my 36 gallon:



 
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