37 Gallon Tank

Ghost pepper

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So I found a used Eshopps wet dry filter for 40 bucks for my 75gal FW tank. When I went to pick it up I was told I would have to take everything which was a 37gal tank with old live rock and what I was told is everything I would need to start a saltwater tank. Some substrate lights a big piece of dried out live rock and lights. I would still like to use the filter for my 75 if possible but I will turn it into a fuge if need be, just might need some guidance. I guess my question is do you guys think I can bring the rock back to life and get a circulation pump to start a Fowler? I have no problem waiting and only want a pair of clowns as of now. With my research so far I do realize I need a protien skimmer daily water top offs a salinity tester and weekly water changes which I do with all my FWs also, im pricing rodi systems now because buying water for them is starting to add up anyways. I've always wanted a SW and it doesnt sound as complicated as I once thought, but I still have a lot of research to do before I jump in so any information or criticism is greatlt appreciated.
 
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Ghost pepper

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I dont have to. I could do freshwater and be completely happy about it. I more or less am just asking questions to find out if I truely want to. Im not set one way or the other. Knowledge is is power though and if I discover its something I really want to then I would like to have the information needed
 

Jesterrace

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Crafty Cichlid said:
Why do you have to do saltwater?
Why do you have to go down to the section devoted to saltwater and ask silly questions?

@The OP for a 37 gallon tank an HOB filter would be very cost effective (The Fluval 70 or the Seachem Tidal 75 would be great choices for that tank). They are both relatively inexpensive and easy to clean and maintain (and provide you the option to either use them as a fuge or add beneficial filter media to them). You will need a powerhead/wavemaker of some form Jebao makes one you can get from Amazon for about $50 or you can go with a Hydor Koralia 3rd gen if you want more flow. As for the protein skimmer, I would skip it if you plan on doing weekly water changes as you really won't get that much benefit from it, but a significant added cost if you want a decent one (runs between $150-$200 for a decent HOB unit). Your food source and not overfeeding will be your two biggest allies (Stick with frozen foods for a cleaner tank).

As for other equipment, you will need the following:

An RODI system or you will need to purchase RODI from your LFS
Something like Instant Ocean Salt Mix
A Refractometer (DO NOT WASTE YOUR MONEY ON A HYDROMETER) as it will measure the salinity of your water
Substrate
Live Rock or Dry Rock and you will want 30-40 lbs of it to handle the tank when fully stocked
A source of Ammonia that is safe for fish tanks (Dr. Tims is a popular choice)
A Source of Bacteria to help seed the dead rock and bring it back to life
Buckets and Drain Hose (I assume you already have these)
A Screen top or some form of top for your tank if you don't already have one (ALL FISH WILL JUMP AT SOME POINT)
A Digital Thermometer (I am partial to the Zacro Digital Thermometers on Amazon as they are cheap, but relatively accurate)
Rolling Trashcans for you to mix your own water and a spare jug or two for top offs of RODI water. Remember that water evaporates but salt doesn't so you will need to add fresh RODI water to your tank as water evaporates to keep the salinity stable.
 

HarryPotter

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:emoji_candle:
Ghost pepper said:
I dont have to. I could do freshwater and be completely happy about it. I more or less am just asking questions to find out if I truely want to. Im not set one way or the other. Knowledge is is power though and if I discover its something I really want to then I would like to have the information needed
Saltwater is amazing. The colors from properly cared for corals are second to none. Those freshwater punks are just jealous

Skimmers are not mandatory at all, they remove surplus nutrients. Don’t feed so much, and you won’t have those to begin with.

Pretty good info from J above to get started
 

Jesterrace

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@HarryPotter, I have to agree that I do find it amusing that a number freshwater individuals spread misinformation or claim that saltwater is overrated, yet when you look at their tanks you see the pirate chest bubbler, plastic/rubber anemones, rubber clownfish or blue tangs, and other various marine/oceanlife inspired themes.
 

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HarryPotter said:
Because it’s so much better than freshwater?

We get more colors than green and brown
To be fair Bettas, Dwarf Gouramis, Some Mollies and Endlers, Cardinal and Neon Tetras and Electric Blue Cichlids offer more than that. My biggest gripe is that the colors are generally more muted than with saltwater. Glofish are about the only Freshwater Analog to Saltwater Fish in terms of bright vibrant colors that pop.
 

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Jesterrace said:
@HarryPotter, I have to agree that I do find it amusing that a number freshwater individuals spread misinformation or claim that saltwater is overrated, yet when you look at their tanks you see the pirate chest bubbler, plastic/rubber anemones, rubber clownfish or blue tangs, and other various marine/oceanlife inspired themes.
Absolutely. 99.99% of them either have dull colors, or are plasticky and amateur.
 

HarryPotter

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Jesterrace said:
To be fair Bettas, Dwarf Gouramis, Some Mollies and Endlers, Cardinal and Neon Tetras and Electric Blue Cichlids offer more than that. My biggest gripe is that the colors are generally more muted than with saltwater. Glofish are about the only Freshwater Analog to Saltwater Fish in terms of bright vibrant colors that pop.
Lol, neon tetras if you want your tank under a blue light. Bettas? Can’t have more than one in your tank. Sure, blue cichlids look nice. But overall, I can’t think of any freshwater tank that would even remotely compare to a healthy reef.
 
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Ghost pepper

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All the amazing colors are what inspired me to try to be honest. It will be a long time before I attempt any coral but from what I gather the life rock is the first step anyway. Thank you very much for the help @Jesterrace Im sure Ill have plenty of questions as I continue the process
 

HarryPotter

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Ghost pepper said:
All the amazing colors are what inspired me to try to be honest. It will be a long time before I attempt any coral but from what I gather the life rock is the first step anyway. Thank you very much for the help @Jesterrace Im sure Ill have plenty of questions as I continue the process

Corals aren’t particularly hard either! To begin with, keep on top of your salinity and temperature, and have lots of lighting and flow. Later on, certain species of corals want more specific parameters but there are plenty of beginner friendly ones.

My 72 gallon display- I know, too crowded. Need to ship out more frags

VkhYf5R.jpg
 

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HarryPotter said:
Corals aren’t particularly hard either! To begin with, keep on top of your salinity and temperature, and have lots of lighting and flow. Later on, certain species of corals want more specific parameters but there are plenty of beginner friendly ones.

My 72 gallon display- I know, too crowded. Need to ship out more frags

View attachment 437671
You got me beat for coral. Very impressive. As for corals being hard? That depends. For some odd reason I can't grow zoanthids or soft leather mushrooms to save my life but I have no problem with Euphyllia Corals (ie Hammer, Frogspawn). Two small feedings of reef frenzy a day, weekly water changes, good lighting and regular filter maintenance keeps them happy.
 

FishLoverEmma0

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HarryPotter said:
Corals aren’t particularly hard either! To begin with, keep on top of your salinity and temperature, and have lots of lighting and flow. Later on, certain species of corals want more specific parameters but there are plenty of beginner friendly ones.

My 72 gallon display- I know, too crowded. Need to ship out more frags

View attachment 437671
Its nice to actually see some eautiful and healthy corals! What kind of light do you use? And those are some nice clowns!
 

HarryPotter

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FishLoverEmma0 said:
Its nice to actually see some eautiful and healthy corals! What kind of light do you use? And those are some nice clowns!
I use an ATI 8x54w, eight T5 bulbs. Need a ton of lighting for my hard coral!
 

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HarryPotter said:
No, there are a few other fish in there too. Wrasses hid when I took out the camera. I mainly like my corals though
What kind of wrasses do you have.? My Juvie Melanurus is a ham and loves to come out and perform for the camera as long as I am not making quick jerky movements (as seen in my Euphyllia Corals video when it repeatedly inserts itself into the vid).
 
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