3 spot gourami with small schooling fish

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Mii

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Aqadvisor says blue/3 spot/gold/opaline gouramis are too aggressive to live with small schooling fish like neon tetras and cherry barbs. Is this true? I know the warnings on aqadvisor aren't always very accurate just wanted to check.
 

Crimson_687

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Depends on the personality. Sometimes it works, sometimes they’re just too aggressive. You can increase your chance of success by heavily planting your tank, having a larger tank, and trying to pick a gourami that seems the most docile, but it’s not a guarantee it will work. It’s definitely worth a try, and it should work, but have a backup if it doesn’t. I’d recommend having the tetras first, letting them settle, then adding the gourami last. If you add the tetras after him, he’s more likely to see them as threats to his territory. Again, have a backup plan if it doesn’t work.

Edit: you may want to consider a more docile gourami, like a pearl or honey
 

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Nameer Khan

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Aqadvisor often is wrong about fish’s temperamt, it should work fine
 

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Some individuals are spiteful. Luckily the female Gold Gourami (a colour form of the Three-spot) I have at the moment is not only a beauty but is also a model citizen. The Gold Gourami is a colour form of the Three-spot.
 

jinjerJOSH22

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I kept my male with Ember Tetra without any issues. I tried adding Harlequin Rasbora thinking it should be fine since the Embers were a similar size and he hunted and killed all three of them.
He’s killed every guppy I’ve tried keeping with him.
They’re big and capable of killing even large fish.
 
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Would they be ok with the indestructible black skirt tetra?

Will a female be less aggressive?
 

jinjerJOSH22

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Mine was fine for the short time I had him with them. Although they get a decent size themselves and could provoke a reaction as the Three Spot matures.
Males are typically more aggressive but females can be just as bad.
 
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jinjerJOSH22 said:
Mine was fine for the short time I had him with them. Although they get a decent size themselves and could provoke a reaction as the Three Spot matures.
Males are typically more aggressive but females can be just as bad.
Why only a short time was there a problem with them getting along or did you separate them for another reason?
 
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jinjerJOSH22

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Mii said:
Why only a short time was there a problem with them getting along or did you separate them for another reason?
He outgrew the tank, 28 gallons.
 
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jinjerJOSH22 said:
He outgrew the tank, 28 gallons.
But they got along fine?
 
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jinjerJOSH22

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Mii said:
But they got along fine?
They didn’t really interact so yeah in that sense.
The Tetra were still young and he still some growing to do. I imagine it would’ve changed had they stayed together too much longer.

Id still advise against keeping one in a small tank and on its own.
 
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jinjerJOSH22 said:
They didn’t really interact so yeah in that sense.
The Tetra were still young and he still some growing to do. I imagine it would’ve changed had they stayed together too much longer.

Id still advise against keeping one in a small tank and on its own.
About keeping it alone i know you said yours do better in groups, but I've also heard of them killing all the other gouramis, so even if there is some added benefit of keeping it with others, if it may kill them that doesn't sound worth the risk to me.
 
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Crimson_687 said:
Depends on the personality. Sometimes it works, sometimes they’re just too aggressive. You can increase your chance of success by heavily planting your tank, having a larger tank, and trying to pick a gourami that seems the most docile, but it’s not a guarantee it will work. It’s definitely worth a try, and it should work, but have a backup if it doesn’t. I’d recommend having the tetras first, letting them settle, then adding the gourami last. If you add the tetras after him, he’s more likely to see them as threats to his territory. Again, have a backup plan if it doesn’t work.

Edit: you may want to consider a more docile gourami, like a pearl or honey
I read mixed reviews on the pearl. What about dwarf females?
 
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Don't pearls get bigger than 3 spot? Would a pearl gourami be ok in a 30 gallon 36x12x16 inches (LxWxH)?
 
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Vivo said:
I read mixed reviews on the pearl. What about dwarf females?
Females can be hard to find, but otherwise the same. It’s personality dependent. The only real difference is size
Mii said:
Don't pearls get bigger than 3 spot? Would a pearl gourami be ok in a 30 gallon 36x12x16 inches (LxWxH)?
given the size of a pearl I would say they’re better off in a 50, but I’ve never kept them myself
 
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Mii said:
Don't pearls get bigger than 3 spot? Would a pearl gourami be ok in a 30 gallon 36x12x16 inches (LxWxH)?
I read they were aggressive. I also read that female dwarf gouramies were not as long as you have floating plants. Then, I had someone tell me they were murderers. Sigh... I've got neons and HR's and would like a centerpiece fish or two that isn't aggressive. I can't seem to find agreement myself.
 
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Vivo said:
I read they were aggressive. I also read that female dwarf gouramies were not as long as you have floating plants. Then, I had someone tell me they were murderers. Sigh... I've got neons and HR's and would like a centerpiece fish or two that isn't aggressive. I can't seem to find agreement myself.
Have u tried honey gourami? I don’t know if this is true for everyone, but in my area it is so much easier to find female honey gourami vs. finding female dwarf gourami
 
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Crimson_687 said:
Have u tried honey gourami? I don’t know if this is true for everyone, but in my area it is so much easier to find female honey gourami vs. finding female dwarf gourami
Why IS that??? I can't find females anywhere!!!
 
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Vivo said:
Why IS that??? I can't find females anywhere!!!
You can call your LFS and see if they can order for you. If you don’t have any good LFS, there are actually some Petco locations that carry them. From what I’ve seen it’s very few Petcos that carry them, maybe 1/10, and they carry the gold variety in both males and females. I know a lot of people don’t trust Petco, but some locations, particularly those with a larger aquatic department, don’t overstock, carry a large variety, care for the fish (and use the right to refuse selling a fish when needed), and the fish are always healthy. They carry sunset thicklips as well, but they don’t mix them.

Even if your petco location isn’t that great, they can still order it for you, but then the fish may be sick and what they order is what you get

Edit; with any type of gourami, it boils down to personality and tank conditions. I’m sure you could find aggressive sparkling gourami, which are the smallest of them all. Other times, the fish is perfect for a community setting, the tank is just too small or not planted enough, so of course they’re going to be aggressive
 
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jinjerJOSH22

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Ok, so the biggest argument for keeping Three Spots in a group is, they live in groups in the wild.
You say it’s not worth the risk but you’d be risking any other fish as well as the health of the lone social animal. It doesn’t seem right to me.
But I’m a Gourami nerd so eh. (Also have 2 years or so of keeping Three Spots)

Pearls stay smaller than Three Spots and I actually think a 29 is ok for a pair or trio. They’re typically much less aggressive than Three Spots and from my experience less active than them.

Only Dwarf Gourami(Trichogaster Lalius)females are hard to come by, Gourami females in general are usually sold mixed in with the males, since for the most part they are similar looking. Personally I would stay clear of Dwarf Gourami(Trichogaster Lalius) I’ve had 16 in the past 2 years and currently have 0. The health of these fish is abysmal and I didn’t find them particularly social when I kept a group(2 groups) of females.

Mii I don’t want you to think this is a personal attack or anything. Just know, I get nothing from you not keeping a Three Spot, in fact I would lose out, since there won’t be a fellow keeper to share experience with.
You’ve talked on other threads you’ve made about a getting a 55? I would wholeheartedly recommend that if you want to keep Three Spots(Trichopodus Trichopterus) and keep them in a group of 4 to 6 with 1 male. I think you’d enjoy them a lot. It would also be beneficial for the schooling fish you want with them and give you the opportunity to create something really special to look at.
 
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jinjerJOSH22 said:
Ok, so the biggest argument for keeping Three Spots in a group is, they live in groups in the wild.
You say it’s not worth the risk but you’d be risking any other fish as well as the health of the lone social animal. It doesn’t seem right to me.
But I’m a Gourami nerd so eh. (Also have 2 years or so of keeping Three Spots)

Pearls stay smaller than Three Spots and I actually think a 29 is ok for a pair or trio. They’re typically much less aggressive than Three Spots and from my experience less active than them.

Only Dwarf Gourami(Trichogaster Lalius)females are hard to come by, Gourami females in general are usually sold mixed in with the males, since for the most part they are similar looking. Personally I would stay clear of Dwarf Gourami(Trichogaster Lalius) I’ve had 16 in the past 2 years and currently have 0. The health of these fish is abysmal and I didn’t find them particularly social when I kept a group(2 groups) of females.

Mii I don’t want you to think this is a personal attack or anything. Just know, I get nothing from you not keeping a Three Spot, in fact I would lose out, since there won’t be a fellow keeper to share experience with.
You’ve talked on other threads you’ve made about a getting a 55? I would wholeheartedly recommend that if you want to keep Three Spots(Trichopodus Trichopterus) and keep them in a group of 4 to 6 with 1 male. I think you’d enjoy them a lot. It would also be beneficial for the schooling fish you want with them and give you the opportunity to create something really special to look at.
Well i really wanted a green terror cichlid for the 55, but maybe i could do a different tank for 3 spot, how many feet of tank do you think i need for 3 females? I don't want to do males to reduce aggression.are they super docile to each other like honey gouramis? Or are do they each need their own territory (like a thick lipped gourami that accidentally got put with honeys, but really doesn't get along with honeys)
 
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Mii said:
Well i really wanted a green terror cichlid for the 55, but maybe i could do a different tank for 3 spot, how many feet of tank do you think i need for 3 females? I don't want to do males to reduce aggression.are they super docile to each other like honey gouramis? Or are do they each need their own territory (like a thick lipped gourami that accidentally got put with honeys, but really doesn't get along with honeys)
At least 40” which is 3.3ft but ideally 4ft.
I would get 4, it’s a nice sweet spot for forming a social hierarchy.
Females can be just as aggressive as males but you won’t have to worry about a male building a bubble nest and guarding it. I personally think it’s a good idea to have a male, they’ll usually take charge of the group.
Aggression within the group is completely normal behaviour, you need to keep an eye on excessive fin nipping or fighting but they don’t often progress more than a chase.
 
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Crimson_687 said:
Have u tried honey gourami? I don’t know if this is true for everyone, but in my area it is so much easier to find female honey gourami vs. finding female dwarf gourami
i already have honeys in my 20 gallon i want variety.
 
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Vivo said:
Why IS that??? I can't find females anywhere!!!
you don't need to find females even the males are super docile as long as you get true honeys (trichogaster chuna) and not thick lipped gouramis(trichogaster labiosa) which can be kinda mean and are often mislabeled as honeys. if you get "golden"(yellow) honeys or the wild type one you should be safe red and "sunset" morphs of the thick lipped are often mislabeled as honeys so unless you look at lots of those color morphs online and can be 100% sure i'd steer clear of them unless you're prepared to house more aggressive thick lipped gouramis(which isn't that hard i just moved mine to an empty 10 gallon when she started attacking my honeys. the easiest way to tell them apart is a male honey gourami will have color on his tale (it varies with females) meanwhile a thick lipped gourami will have a clear/white tail, and the thick lipped will have a bigger forehead, thicker lips, stockier build, flatter back as opposed to a honey's more arched back, and the thick lipped gourami's dorsal fin will have more of a dip in it. also while both have some sexial dimorphism in the shape of the end of the dorsal fin, the male's being pointed and the female's rounded, it's a lot more extreme in the thick lipped, the male's fin is very pointed and longer, and the female's is very rounded, meanwhile the honeys will be harder to tell.
 
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