29 gallon algae/bottom fish

Boot2

Hello,
We have a 29 gallon fresh water tank at the office. Currently it has 6 tiger barbs and one very tiny crayfish.
The tank used to have a Twig Catfish and a Common Pleco to keep everything tidy, but I relocated those to my home tank. There are a couple of plastic plants, and a larger center decoration for a reef and one small hiding place for the crayfish.

I would like to add a fish to clean up things, but also be happy with the tank. We only have a PetSmart near us and they don't have many options, but I want something that will stay small and be happy in a 29gallon. It also has a black sand bottom if this is of concern/comfort to a fish.

Any suggestions?

pic attached.
 

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Seasoldier

Hi, I'd add a few Nerite or Military Helmet snails, they don't breed in freshwater, have a small bioload & are voracious algae eaters, they'd clear any algae in no time at all.
 
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86 ssinit

Nerites are great for algae and corys for eating the excess food.
 
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Boot2

Do Coreys like to be by themselves or do they like being in groups of 2, 3 ? Do they like hiding places?
 
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86 ssinit

For me I’ve had 1,2, and many in a tank. Never had a problem. I like 2 of whatever so I go with a minimum of 2. For your 29g you can add as many as 6.
 
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Boot2

Thanks 86 ssinit
 
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Seasoldier

Do Coreys like to be by themselves or do they like being in groups of 2, 3 ? Do they like hiding places?
If you're going for corys they do like to be in groups, you could get a nice school of 6 to 8 dwarf corys or pygmy corys, they both get to about 1 to 1.5 inches.
 
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Ouse

Hi there.

To me, those don’t look like tiger barbs; more like a species of tetra.

If you’re looking for algae eating fish cories are a no no. They can’t digest algae and it shouldn’t be fed to them. They won’t eat it and they shouldn’t. They’re a nice shoaling fish, but they won’t solve your problem. They will eat excess food that sinks to the substrate, but they shouldn’t be confused with algae eaters.

It’s a good thing the common pleco is out of there because a single common requires an enormous tank. Also, it was creating more algae, not lessening it.

Don’t get fish to eat algae; all this will do is encourage it’s growth further. More fish: higher nitrate produced: more algae. Live plants will outcompete algae for nutrients (such as nitrate) so using live plants is the better option. Then there’s also manually removing it during every water change. Using snails can work, but ones that do hatch in freshwater will multiply in the thousands. Good if this is what you‘re looking for but some don’t like the look of it. Nerites breed in freshwater, their eggs just don’t hatch in it.

Unless algae is spiralling out of control or there is no algae at all, there’s no issue with algae. I don’t see any algae in the tank anyway?

Your aquarium details states you’re unfamiliar with the nitrogen cycle BTW.
 
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Wouldratherwatchaquarium

If you are still considering a bottom feeding fish you can't go wrong with a BN pleco. I've found juveniles are pretty effective algae eaters but they have a high biobload and poop allot so long term not a good solution to an algae problem.
 
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Boot2

Thank you everyone. And yes I am new to this, and I was told they were Barb's. But I believe you are correct and they are tetras.

I was basically looking for something to keep that tank a bit cleaner on the bottom, but something that that little crayfish wouldn't bother either. And of course a fish that got along with the others, and was not lonely being by itself. If it needed a couple of them then fine but I can't imagine 6 in that tank. It's only 29 gallon. thank you as well for the algea tips. since removing the large Pleco it does not seem to be an issue any longer.
 
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Spudsssy

What species of crayfish is it? If it isn't a dwarf crayfish you will be very limited to what you can add to the tank.
 
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Boot2

Hello, I'm new really not sure. My boss put one in there and later told us that they can reproduce on the own. Not what I would have wanted it all but.. it's about 1 in to 1 and 1/2 in, with a very slight blue tint.
 
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BigManAquatics

Bn plecos are great too. 1 fish, eats some algae, acts like a hoover vac on leftover food on the substrate. Least mine do.
 
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Pictuscats

Algae issue.. snails, otocinclus or smaller BN.
Scavengers .. a hamdful of cories
 
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Ouse

Algae issue.. snails, otocinclus or smaller BN.
Scavengers .. a hamdful of cories
Belated reply, but I didn’t see this until now.

Otocinclus aren’t algae eaters and only target algae for the microfauna that settle on it, often described as aufwuchs. A tank has to be several months running for a few otos to have enough aufwuchs to survive. They are slow to accept commercial foods as food, often causing them to starve.

By adding a bristlenose pleco you’re increasing the bioload substantially with a fish that doesn’t eat much algae if fed properly. If anything it creates much more than it will remove.

You’re right with what you said about the snails and cories.
 
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