20 Gallon Long Fowlr

Foobie97

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is a 20 gallon long a good start out tank? I’m new too saltwater and I’ve kept freshwater , I got a 20 long from Petco and was hoping this is a good choice
 
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Foobie97

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JLeeM

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I’m thinking of using the 10 gallon I got as a sump too, any stocking suggestions I want personal fish
You'll want a bigger tank than a 10 for a sump. By the time you get all your equipment in it, if it would even all fit in there, then you won't have much room for your hands or water.

I'm literally no help on much SW stuff, including stocking.

The ones I tagged above should be along in due time to help you out. Oh and @Lchi87 is another good one. I believe she has a........tailspot blenny that's pretty neat in her 10 gallon nano reef tank. She can tell you more.
 
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Foobie97

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You'll want a bigger tank than a 10 for a sump. By the time you get all your equipment in it, if it would even all fit in there, then you won't have much room for your hands or water.

I'm literally no help on much SW stuff, including stocking.

The ones I tagged above should be along in due time to help you out. Oh and @Lchi87 is another good one. I believe she has a........tailspot blenny that's pretty neat in her 10 gallon nano reef tank. She can tell you more.
I want a setup less then 300$ I’m doing a fowlr And only plan on doing a few fish
 

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A 20 Long is a good size starter tank for saltwater and it maximizes the dimension that matters most (length) when it comes to fish. As for the $300 budget that is a bit tight once you factor in all the odds and ends items you will need to get it setup it will be closer to $400 to get it ready for fish. If you want a sump you will need to add another $200-$300 cost to the setup. You don't need a sump on a tank that small, so I would go sumpless and just do frequent water changes, watch your feeding and use a clean food source (ie LRS Reef Frenzy. It will save you a fair bit of money. I recommend checking out this video as it discusses the components needed to setup a 20 Long FOWLR. Also it is strongly recommended that you get an RODI (Reverse Osmosis with Deionizer) system or get it from your LFS as tap water tends to cause problems with saltwater tanks.

 
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Foobie97

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A 20 Long is a good size starter tank for saltwater and it maximizes the dimension that matters most (length) when it comes to fish. As for the $300 budget that is a bit tight once you factor in all the odds and ends items you will need to get it setup it will be closer to $400 to get it ready for fish. If you want a sump you will need to add another $200-$300 cost to the setup. You don't need a sump on a tank that small, so I would go sumpless and just do frequent water changes, watch your feeding and use a clean food source (ie LRS Reef Frenzy. It will save you a fair bit of money. I recommend checking out this video as it discusses the components needed to setup a 20 Long FOWLR. Also it is strongly recommended that you get an RODI (Reverse Osmosis with Deionizer) system or get it from your LFS as tap water tends to cause problems with saltwater tanks.

Any good stocking suggestions
 

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I do love my tailspot blenny, he’s very outgoing and I always see him hovering around the rock and nipping at any algae or hanging out in his little cave. Clownfish are pretty common choices too. Check out LiveAquaria’s nano fish section, they’re actually pretty on point with stocking suggestions there.
 
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Foobie97

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I do love my tailspot blenny, he’s very outgoing and I always see him hovering around the rock and nipping at any algae or hanging out in his little cave. Clownfish are pretty common choices too. Check out LiveAquaria’s nano fish section, they’re actually pretty on point with stocking suggestions there.
Any good beginner corals that could go with a cheap light?
 

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Any good beginner corals that could go with a cheap light?
I guess it would depend on the light. I thought you only wanted to do a fowlr?

With corals, a budget light would still run you about $100 (black box lights from China) but you also get what you pay for imo. If that light malfunctions or breaks, I would not expect any help from the seller. If you spend the extra cash and get a decent light, you’ll find that the quality is way better and you won’t have to worry about the customer service aspect of it either

If you’re going to attempt corals, it will inevitably cost more though. Corals themselves are not cheap, and then you’ll have to either dose nutrients to keep them healthy and growing, or manage that with weekly water changes. Depending on how fast they consume nutrients, you may have to dose anyway.

My advice is not to skimp. If corals are something you are interested in, it makes more sense to save up for the good stuff than try to make do with lesser quality equipment.

That being said, softies tend to be easier to care for ime. Mushrooms, zoas, and the like.
 

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Corals and cheap lighting rarely go well together. One of the reasons many people start with FOWLR is because corals and lighting add significant expense. The cheapest light I could recommed for a 20 Long that would grow corals would be the Mars Aqua chinese black box for around $110 and that would still not give the greatest growth on the sides since it only covers a 24 inch spread. If you want full coverage an Ocean Revive Artic T-247B would be the way to go but that will push you closer to $200. Individual coral frags start at around $15 each and can go upwards of $100 for a single frag. So even if you only put a handful of the cheapest frags in there you would be over $100 just in corals. As mentioned above you would be way past your budget between the corals and lighting.
 
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Foobie97

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I guess it would depend on the light. I thought you only wanted to do a fowlr?

With corals, a budget light would still run you about $100 (black box lights from China) but you also get what you pay for imo. If that light malfunctions or breaks, I would not expect any help from the seller. If you spend the extra cash and get a decent light, you’ll find that the quality is way better and you won’t have to worry about the customer service aspect of it either

If you’re going to attempt corals, it will inevitably cost more though. Corals themselves are not cheap, and then you’ll have to either dose nutrients to keep them healthy and growing, or manage that with weekly water changes. Depending on how fast they consume nutrients, you may have to dose anyway.

My advice is not to skimp. If corals are something you are interested in, it makes more sense to save up for the good stuff than try to make do with lesser quality equipment.

That being said, softies tend to be easier to care for ime. Mushrooms, zoas, and the like.
Can a dottyback live in a 20 long? How about any other colorful fish I want something that pops

Corals and cheap lighting rarely go well together. One of the reasons many people start with FOWLR is because corals and lighting add significant expense. The cheapest light I could recommed for a 20 Long that would grow corals would be the Mars Aqua chinese black box for around $110 and that would still not give the greatest growth on the sides since it only covers a 24 inch spread. If you want full coverage an Ocean Revive Artic T-247B would be the way to go but that will push you closer to $200. Individual coral frags start at around $15 each and can go upwards of $100 for a single frag. So even if you only put a handful of the cheapest frags in there you would be over $100 just in corals. As mentioned above you would be way past your budget between the corals and lighting.
Ahhh okay so I’m just wait on the coral, I’m looking for some fish that will pop together
 
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Lchi87

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Can a dottyback live in a 20 long? How about any other colorful fish I want something that pops
You can do a dottyback but I’ve heard mixed reviews on aggression level. I suggest planning out your stocking, and add fish starting from least aggressive and working your way up to most.

Do a little research on fish you are interested in first and foremost. It will really pay off to arm yourself with as much information as you can when it comes to salty keeping. As always, fish have individual personalities and there are always exceptions to the rule but really, take some time and read up. Nothing good happens fast in saltwater tanks!
 
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Foobie97

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You can do a dottyback but I’ve heard mixed reviews on aggression level. I suggest planning out your stocking, and add fish starting from least aggressive and working your way up to most.

Do a little research on fish you are interested in first and foremost. It will really pay off to arm yourself with as much information as you can when it comes to salty keeping. As always, fish have individual personalities and there are always exceptions to the rule but really, take some time and read up. Nothing good happens fast in saltwater tanks!
Ok how’s 1 fire fish
1 clownfish
A watchman goby
And a cleaner shrimp
 

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Ok how’s 1 fire fish
1 clownfish
A watchman goby
And a cleaner shrimp
I think that could work! Don’t forget that there are other inverts to consider as well that can be part of your cleanup crew. Hermits, conches, trochus snails etc. They help keep the tank tidy and are often just as enjoyable to watch!

In terms of order, I would do: firefish and shrimp, goby, then clownfish. Space out the additions so your biological bacteria can catch up.
 
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Foobie97

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I think that could work! Don’t forget that there are other inverts to consider as well that can be part of your cleanup crew. Hermits, conches, trochus snails etc. They help keep the tank tidy and are often just as enjoyable to watch!

In terms of order, I would do: firefish and shrimp, goby, then clownfish. Space out the additions so your biological bacteria can catch up.
Thank u so much for your help!!!! Also is a fuzzy dwarf lionfish ok in a 20 long?
 

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I agree that the dottyback should definitely be avoided. Personally I am not a fan of firefish since they tend to be ultra cowardly and are easily bullied. If you want color and a fish that is more bold without being ultra agrrlessive I would suggest a Royal Gramma Basslet. It will give you a similar shape and color to a dottyback but is much more likely to co-exist.

I recommend spending some time over at as they are pretty accurate for minimum tank sizes, tempeament, whether or not a given fish is reef safe, ect.
 

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Thank u so much for your help!!!! Also is a fuzzy dwarf lionfish ok in a 20 long?
Definitely too big. If you look on LA it is listed as a 50 gallon minimum. The tank is too narrow and shallow for a fuzzy dwarf lion. They get about 7 inches long plus the length of their spines.
 
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Foobie97

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Definitely too big. If you look on LA it is listed as a 50 gallon minimum. The tank is too narrow and shallow for a fuzzy dwarf lion. They get about 7 inches long plus the length of their spines.
There any lionfish in a 20 long

Of course! Hmm not sure. I’m not too familiar with lionfish in general but what info have you found so far?
Some sites say a 29
 
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