20 gallon high stocking advice

Brnick

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I have a planted 20 gallon high that has been running for about two months now. I currently have 6 rummy nose tetras in there and am thinking about what to add next. I suppose a few more of these tetras, plus some bottom-dwelling fish, probably some type of cory. I was thinking of the salt and pepper cory because they are the only dwarf cory that stick to the bottom, or so I have read. Could another possibility be a smaller shoal of panda corydoras? They are a bit cheaper and easier to come by, but I am not sure if my tank's footprint is big enough for them.

At this point would my tank be pretty much stocked? Could I add anything else really? The tetras are black and white with that spot of red and the corys would also be black/white/gray. I would like to have another color there somehow, like blue or yellow. Maybe shrimp? Or could I get another fish species in there somehow? Thanks!
 

FishGirl38

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Well, salt and pepper corys aren't actually true dwarfs. They'll still get about the typical 1.5 inchs that most corydora do. The largest species of cory are cory brochus, and those max out around 4in. Most of the other species will get about 2In. The two dwarf corydora that I know of are corydora habrosus, and corydora pygmaus. These guys will only get about an inch. Panda cory also get about 1.5inch.

Perhaps it's the difference in region, but where I am, palatius corydora (salt and pepper is their common name) go for cheaper (3.99a pc) than panda corydora - which are considered more fancier and harder to come by at (5.99 a pc).

If you add another school of tetra and then a school of bottom feeders, than yes, the tank would be at about it's threshold.

If you only wanted one species of tetra in the tank, you could have a showcase type fish like a dwarf gouramI or other larger middle/top swimmer.
 
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Brnick

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JettsPapa said:
One possibility would be to add a few more of the rummy nose tetras, and then a school of ember tetras.
I do like ember tetras. Are they also mid-level swimmers like the rummy noses? I don't want to have the mid-section too crowded.
 

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I believe OP is referring to Habrosus Corys when calling them "Salt & Pepper". Sometimes they get confused with "Peppered" Corys, which are much larger.
The 3 'dwarf' Corys are Habrosus, Pygmy and Hastatus. They each go by a variety of 'common' names :)
 
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Brnick

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Hmmm, maybe I should have just stuck to the Latin names. By salt and pepper cory, I meant corydora habrosus. Apparently, palatius corydora is the peppered cory (I looked it up). Pretty, similar names!

The idea of a showcase fish sounds nice. Say a dwarf or honey gourami, or even a betta. I have an internal filter, but the flow at the surface seems pretty high. I don't know if these kind of fish will be able to handle it.

FishGirl38 said:
Well, salt and pepper corys aren't actually true dwarfs. They'll still get about the typical 1.5 inchs that most corydora do. The largest species of cory are cory brochus, and those max out around 4in. Most of the other species will get about 2In. The two dwarf corydora that I know of are corydora habrosus, and corydora pygmaus. These guys will only get about an inch. Panda cory also get about 1.5inch.

Perhaps it's the difference in region, but where I am, palatius corydora (salt and pepper is their common name) go for cheaper (3.99a pc) than panda corydora - which are considered more fancier and harder to come by at (5.99 a pc).

If you add another school of tetra and then a school of bottom feeders, than yes, the tank would be at about it's threshold.

If you only wanted one species of tetra in the tank, you could have a showcase type fish like a dwarf gouramI or other larger middle/top swimmer.
 

FishGirl38

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Algonquin said:
I believe OP is referring to Habrosus Corys when calling them "Salt & Pepper". Sometimes they get confused with "Peppered" Corys, which are much larger.
The 3 'dwarf' Corys are Habrosus, Pygmy and Hastatus. They each go by a variety of 'common' names :)
Huh, where I work we label plateaus cory as "salt and pepper" cory sometimes. We label cory habrosus as corydora habrosus. I've never heard of peppered cory. Sorry for the confusion but that's good anyway, you knew what you were doin. :).

I don't have any good recommendations then, I wanna say dwarf cichlids but that's not a good recommendation. peacock gudgeons or scarlet badis are cool but, I'm not thinking on the right plain for your tank at the moment...imo.
 

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I’m later than usual getting involved in a convo about cories, sorry about that.

I’d definitely recommend getting some cories, but make sure that you take care of the school of tetras that you already have first.
I’d recommend some corydoras pygmaeus. They’ll swim along the bottom of the tank and you’ll see them swimming in the mid to upper levels on occasion.
Personally, I can’t find any less common fish where I live (like rams, most cories and discus), so I have to have them shipped in to my house. I buy everything off aquahuna.com and aquaticarts
 

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corydoras pygmaeus are amazingly entertaining and fun little fish! I'd highly recommended these to anyone honestly. With how small they are you could keep 6-10 in there, they have a little yellow/green iridescent stripe on them) , they're very active with a low bioload and will utilize all areas of the tank but snuffle around on the bottom plenty during feeding. If you kept the school of tetra you currently have as is and have decent filtration capacity you could even add a pair of honey gouramI imo, 1 male and a female or two females , just add some tall large plants to calm down the filter flow if you feel its too heavy. Or you could add some filter sponge with slits in it as a baffle ( I do this on a 20h with a giant betta in it) Or you could do a betta, a plakat can tolerate a decent amount of filter flow in comparison to longer finned varieties :)
 
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Brnick

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Those are some great ideas! I would like to do the honey gouramis, but I have never seem them in any of the stores where I live. Maybe the plakat betta will be easier to find.

Falena said:
corydoras pygmaeus are amazingly entertaining and fun little fish! I'd highly recommended these to anyone honestly. With how small they are you could keep 6-10 in there, they have a little yellow/green iridescent stripe on them) , they're very active with a low bioload and will utilize all areas of the tank but snuffle around on the bottom plenty during feeding. If you kept the school of tetra you currently have as is and have decent filtration capacity you could even add a pair of honey gouramI imo, 1 male and a female or two females , just add some tall large plants to calm down the filter flow if you feel its too heavy. Or you could add some filter sponge with slits in it as a baffle ( I do this on a 20h with a giant betta in it) Or you could do a betta, a plakat can tolerate a decent amount of filter flow in comparison to longer finned varieties :)
 

Falena

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Brnick said:
Those are some great ideas! I would like to do the honey gouramis, but I have never seem them in any of the stores where I live. Maybe the plakat betta will be easier to find.
Ah, yeah I have that problem where I live too unfortunately :( . If you had your heart set on them you could always go online? But they are usually not sexed. Be careful not to accidentally purchase 'red honey gourami' or 'sunset gourami' by mistake too. I feel I have to warm everyone about these as they aren't honeys and are in fact a thick lipped gouramI color morph that get larger and more aggressive, too often these are mislabelled and I myself own a pair of thick lipped gouramI because of this lol I love them but they are fiery! A plakat betta shouldn't be hard to find :) there's lots of variation available in stores now too
 

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