2 out of 3 newish cories have died, concerned for the rest.

Mhamilton0911

Member
Last month I bought 3 more albino corydoras to complete my school. They were TINY at the store, so small. At the store, they all were very active, schooling around, generally being cories.

Fast forward a week or so after bringing home, 1 schools with the older 2 I already have, and 2 like to just hang by themselves. Jump ahead another week or so, the slower 2 seem to not be interested in food. When I throw a pellet in, the adults and one baby eagerly sniff it out and the other two are not really interested. They swim around, but will pass a pellet. Jump to a few days ago, one finally passed away. I noticed the body was very clear, I can see all the way through the little thing up to the head, where my other, thriving cories are very opaque, and pinkish creamy colored, can't see through them much at all. The dead one was clearly sunken in, but no apparent trauma or disease that I can spot. The other one, I caught (easily) and floated in a shallow dish in the tank. Not interested in food, but alive. This morning the little fella passed sometime in the night. Same look, very clear, sunken in. Much smaller than the thriving one.

Many other fish in the tank, no issues with any other fish. 0, 0, 30.

My remaining 2 original cories and the 1 lone survivor of the babies are thriving, active, eating, exploring, schooling, sleeping together. Did I just get a weak batch? I'm wanting a full school, but nervous about buying more. Is there a parasite or something else I'm not seeing?
 

mattgirl

Member
I am so sad to read this. :( It is very possible they just weren't healthy from the git go. Do you know if you have both male and female? the females are usually quite a bit bigger than the males. If you have at least one of each they should start laying fertile eggs before long. When they do you may want to collect some of the eggs and hatch them out. By doing so you can be pretty sure they will be healthy. Albino's and bronze (same species as albino, just a different color) are normally pretty prolific at laying eggs.

It is very easy to collect and hatch the eggs. I started mine off on micro-worms and they grew very quickly. Let me know when you get eggs and we can get into how I manage to hatch out and end up with way more corys than I need :D
 
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Mhamilton0911

Member
My adult 2 have spawned a few times before, but with guppies in the tank, they get to those tasty glass snacks before I can collect them. I once was able to collect a couple, but fungus appeared overnight, so none hatched.


I'm thinking they were possibly just weak to begin with, they never really settled, or thrived like the 3rd one that is still doing fine.

So now I have 3, 2 adults and one juvenile. Happy as a trio, but I know I need more.
 

mattgirl

Member
Yep, all the fish love to snack on cory eggs. :) I was having a problem with my cory eggs growing fungus. I can't say it was actually the problem but I noticed as long as I didn't expose them to the air at all it stopped happening or at least cut way down on the number of eggs that didn't hatch.

When I carried them from one tank to another without being under water I was losing most of them. Once I started scraping them off the glass straight into a small container held under water and then carried them to another tank I had much better luck with them hatching.

If you could rescue just a few eggs before the guppies and yes, even the corys eat all of them you can hopefully hatch all you want for this tank. If not then hopefully the next ones you buy will be as healthy as the one little survivor. :)
 

Pwilly07

Member
If you are able to get some eggs, use methylene blue in the container you put the eggs in and add an airstone. I l have done this with pleco eggs too and out of the fertile ones, I was able to hatch 100%. None of them fuzzed up, but the water was a cool blue for some time.
 
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