2.5 gallon betta tank

LyndaB

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Loads of people who keep multiple bettas do so in divided tanks. Your bettas would be much happier with 5 gallons each than 2.5 gallons.

Personally, I never recommend anything less than 5 gallons for a male betta, they need the room to display their finnage.
 
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kinezumi89

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I wish I could have a planted tank! I figure I should tackle one thing at a time, though. How many gallons is that?
 

soltarianknight

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10. And its not reallllly planted, i tossed in java fern and it did that on its own . I JUST installed lights and now i have apontagen and ludwiga in there, but not much.
 
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kinezumi89

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In that case each fish only has 3.33 gallons, which isn't too far off from 2.5...
 

soltarianknight

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Its still more then 2.5 exscuse me. Not to mention its cycled and stable. The diffrence bewteen the room in a 2.5 and a 3.3 divided section is still much bigger. And when it was only in half it was 5gals each.
 
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kinezumi89

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To be honest, I think it's partially a matter of opinion. I've seen plenty of posts on here even with people saying 2.5 is the minimum. If you google "betta minimum tank size" you'll get everything from one liter to 12 gallons. I haven't bought a fish yet (such a sad, empty tank on my desk) and I'm giving it plenty of thought. I would house another fish in there if there was one that would be happy. People have talked about shrimp tanks, but at $10 for a single cherry shrimp, I'm not sure I have the finances to stock a shrimp tank. (Plus I'm not sure about the minimum volume requirements.)
 

pirahnah3

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You could easily do a group of red cherry shrimp in there (and if there char gins $10 for RCS they should be shot, usually you can get them at $1 ea or about there). I think a 2.5 would be ok for a betta, yes they always want more room, I forget how large their territory is in the natural environment but it is bigger than a lot of tanks people use.

As for the cycle if you do a search for fish less cycle you will get a few diff ways to cycle the tank without using fish.
 
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kinezumi89

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I'd like to use TSS, but the smallest bottle I can find is for 30 gallons. I'd use a fraction of it, and I'm pretty sure once you open it, it only lasts for so long. I'll look and see if I can order a smaller bottle from somewhere (even for 10 gallons would be better).

I am aware of the "sprinkle food in" and the "sprinkle pure ammonia in" methods, not sure if there are any else.

When discussing a fish's natural territory, I'm not sure anyone can really mimic that If you consider a fish who can swim about most of the Amazon, even and 800 gallon tank pales in comparison.
 

pirahnah3

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There are a few other methods for cycling, i.e. putting a shrimp in a stocking and leaving it in the tank as the ammonia source.

They do make a smaller bottle of TSS but it usually isn't much cheaper than the big bottle. With TSS I have heard of people trying to split it between tanks but on the label it does say to add the whole bottle.

Sol, why can't you ship us shrimp lol
 

soltarianknight

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Yeah... lol, no bettas have a territory of around 1 meter in circumfrence generaly, thats wilds, they are much more tame and tolerant, i can imagine our overly agressive domestics require MUCH more space. also....bettas are from thailand.

I still think its a bad idea to cycle that small, as any pro breeder and they will tell you the same.
 
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kinezumi89

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I was definitely not implying bettas come from the Amazon (I was thinking of cichlids actually, though feel free to say cichlids don't come from South America, haha), I was just using an example. If they're called "Siamese Fighting Fish," I would assume they come from at least somewhere in/near Asia.

That's surprising they don't use much space in the wild, though.

And yes, please do send me some shrimp! I would love to have a bunch of little red shrimp scurrying about the tank, if only it didn't cost an arm and a leg. Ghost shrimp are about $0.33 here.
 

Donnerjay

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Shrimp cycling is stinky.

I have heard that placing some flake food in a net/pantyhose bag in the tank facilitates cycling, and the food is corralled in the bag so that facilitates cleanup.
 
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kinezumi89

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I forgot to mention, I have heard of the "toss a chunk of fish or shrimp" in the tank method as well.

I'll have to see how much smaller bottles of TSS are before I make a decision. I've toyed with the idea of getting a hardy fish with which to cycle, but then I would have an extra fish once the tank was ready. Are shrimp hardy enough to cycle a tank? (I've never put them in an uncycled tank before.)
 

pirahnah3

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most likely with such a light bio load your tank would never actually cycle.

Actually looking at that tank, I would take and do it up heavily planted and keep it an unfiltered tank and let it go from there.
 
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kinezumi89

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Hmm I've never actually done a planted tank. Are there any plants that would grow well under LEDs? And you're not implying JUST plants, right? If only I could find affordable cherry shrimp, I think a planted cherry shrimp tank would be fun...
 

pirahnah3

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Planted tanks can be very easy or very complex, depends on how you start. LED's are still a bit new in the plant environment and have not been fully proven. That being said I think that you could mess with some easy low light plants and go from there.

Plants also have the added benefit of nitrate uptake thus making tank maint a lot easier.
 

soltarianknight

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Yeah but you wont have much nitrate in a uncycled tank . The issue is as you said, the cycle either doesnt take at all or crashes spotainiously. So you can plant it, dont get me wrong there, fertz are friends. However you just need to clean it out more often, and with a tank of that size, its pretty worth it. Even cycled youll be doing 60-75% a week to remove the nitrate build up.
 
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kinezumi89

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Once a week is no problem, I was planning to do at least twice a week anyway. So..I'm a bit confused. Plants - yay or nay? I know that there won't really be nitrates since the tank won't be cycled. At that point, would they be more for show rather than helping keep the tank healthy? Also, when you said 60-75% weekly water changes, was that assuming a shrimp tank, or a betta?
 
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