Question 1st Saltwater Tank

Jesterrace

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Unless it's a 30 Long, skip angelfish of any kind. They are super active and don't do well in cramped quarters. Generally my recommendation is 3 feet long minimum for the pygmy angels (ie Cherubfish) and 4 feet long minimum for Dwarf Angels (ie Coral Beauty, Flame Angel). A Cherubfish aka Pygmy Angel would be okay in a 30 Long but I wouldn't try any other angelfish. The other Pygmy angelfish tend to be pretty aggressive (ie Yellow Tail, Flameback, Fireball).
 
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aquanerd13

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I actually changed my mind to a 55. I was getting a big enough filter, heater, etc. So i thought I may as well go with a bigger tank.

The 55's are 4 feet long.
 
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aquanerd13

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Could I get a sea slug or a sponge or a sea cucumber or something? An oyster? A sea star? A sea urchin?

I like the idea of inverts, but I read angels are compatible with them?
 
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nikm128

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I actually read somewhere that oysters can somewhat aid in filtration because of the way they get food and stuff out of the water. I think if it weren't for the need of an actual current, as single one could filter an entire 20 gallon tank. I have no idea how true that is though, so be sure to have someone else verify
 
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aquanerd13

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Ok, so oysters are good, it would probably be hard for a clownfish to bully them

I really want a hermit crab(or a few) though.
 
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Jesterrace

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Angels can nip at inverts. If you can keep the water clean and wait until it's well established a tiled starfish would be a cool addition. Also are you going with a drilled setup and sump?
 

Jesterrace

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Not sure yet. Should I?
Absolutely. It will solve many flow issues and provide maximum filtration. 55 gallon aka 4 foot long tank is the tipping point where I recommend a drilled tank with a sump. My recommendation would be to go to your LFS and to purchase a used reef ready setup. It will save you a fortune in costs.
 
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aquanerd13

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I doubt this is what you are talking about:
Stiff-person syndrome (SPS) is a rare neurological disorder with features of an autoimmune disease. SPS is characterized by fluctuating muscle rigidity in the trunk and limbs and a heightened sensitivity to stimuli such as noise, touch, and emotional distress, which can set off muscle spasms. (I found this on google)
 

stella1979

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:hilarious: SPS = Small Polyp Stony corals, typically, the high light high flow corals that are more advanced care than say, LPS or Large Polyp Stony, or soft corals which aren't stony at all. As far as I know, this is a non-scientific but widely accepted way of sorting corals using the ratio of flesh to skeleton. For example, have a look at an Acropora coral for SPS, for LPS perhaps a very fleshy Duncan which almost looks like anemones or something that looks fleshy but feels hard like a Favia. Common soft corals are zoanthids, leathers, xenia, or the ever famous and sometimes invasive green star polyps.

Anyhow, I think the harassment may refer to an anemone and the danger they can present to corals... because anemones have toxic stings and can move around the tank leaving injury and death in their wake. Indeed, a roaming anemone is scary in a reef tank. However, there are many, many reef tanks out there with large and lovely anemones in them. I think the key is... time. Anemones shouldn't be added to brand new tanks because they are sensitive to fluctuations in parameters and are certainly not tolerant of newb mistakes. But... you don't want to spend the time waiting for an anemone covering up your tank in treasured and expensive corals. Adding an anemone to the tank is inviting one to roam, but if the tank is a good environment, a common nem like a bubble tip will likely find it's favorite spot and stay there for the most part. So, we can start a reef tank with some easy care and not too expensive corals, then add an anemone, add more coral, and finally crown her off with some SPS. Because SPS are your least forgiving corals, this works out because all that time leading up to this point, our tank was getting established and mature. However, and here's the kicker, all corals AND anemones are photosynthetic and thus, need very good lighting to survive. After reading this thread, I was kinda thinking this would be a FOWLR tank, without any photosynthetic creatures. A FOWLR is a great way to start the saltwater journey and upgrades can be added later to transform it to a reef tank.

Last thing as far as anemones and corals go... well, the anemone needs a reef light. Not many dedicate their reef lights/tanks to anemones alone. If I'm buying reef lighting to support an anemone, well, that lighting will support coral too, and you can bet your bottom dollar that I wouldn't invest in a reef light and not house coral.
 
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aquanerd13

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This is probably more aplicable:
LPS, which stands for “large polyp stony coral (or large polyp scleractinian),” andSPS, which stands for “small polyp stony coral (or small polyp scleractinian),” are hobby-specific terms referring to the size of a coral's polyp or polyps.(Also found on google)

Thank you! I will look into this more. Any idea what materials I could use for a DIY overflow, or maybe even a DIY sump? I am trying to save money if possible.
 
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Tony_097

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Thank you! I will look into this more. Any idea what materials I could use for a DIY overflow, or maybe even a DIY sump? I am trying to save money if possible.
Petco has tanks that are perfect for sumps if you are still using a 55 I would personally use a sump of 20 long or 30 long. As for overflows you can use a hob overflow but it can be a gamble so it would be more convenient to drill the tank
 
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