15 Gallon Tank 15 Gal. Nano Tank Stocking!

Will it work?

  • Yes

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • No

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Understocked

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    3

SomeoneFISHy

Valued Member
Messages
306
Reaction score
93
Points
38
Experience
1 year
Hi! This is my 1st (CONFIRMED,) post for saltwater. I have finally got a tank! It is a fluval flex 15 gallon freshwater, but modified to be saltwater. The tank is almost in the 2nd week of cycling, the phantom feed, ( Week 1, equipment running w/ saltwater, Week 2, phantom feed, Week 3, repeat 1, Week 4, protein skimmer.) I want to prepare for the fish, coral, and invertebrates I will have.

2 Ocellaris Clownfish
2 Gobies (Not same color)
1 Firefish
Various hermits and snails
1 emerald crab
2 Peppermint Shrimp
1 Bubble Tip Anemone

Xenia coral
Lord coral
Duncan coral
Mushroom coral
Torch coral
Leather coral
Colt coral
Favia

I am very open to feedback, I have just started out in saltwater (physically, I have done plenty of research.) I know that my tank would have around the max amount of life in it, so I'm not planning to add any more. Thanks for the feedback!

P.S. I might not respond instantly, because I will be on and off. I can send a pic of my tank later!
 

PoorBigBlue

Valued Member
Messages
435
Reaction score
348
Points
53
Experience
5 to 10 years
Welcome to the salty side!

Respectfully, all those fish are going to be overstocked. Since it's your first tank, I'd recommend no more than 3 of the fish you listed - preferably 2. If it were me, I'd get a firefish first, and then get another fish after a month or two of the tank being set up. 15 gallons is doable, but it's not a lot to work with, especially in an AIO form factor.

Speaking from experience, avoid peppermint shrimp like the plague if you plan to have anemones or coral. I had to trap mine out of my tank because it was picking at my hammer coral and my Bubble Tip. They're pretty and cool, but I'd say they're only borderline reef-safe - it does come down to the individual, but it's not worth the risk. If you want a shrimp, I'd recommend a Blood Shrimp, as they're supposedly the least risky. But, all shrimp do pose a risk - they'll all try to steal food from your anemone and your corals, and it's up to you if you want to deal with that. I'd definitely add the shrimp after all the corals and anemone is established.

Emerald crabs and hermits can also be risky - they're opportunistic feeders. If they see an opportunity to eat (whether it's algae on your rocks or food in your coral's mouth) they're likely to take it - there's been more than one post online about people losing corals and anemones to crabs.

So, as for your coral list, it looks great! Keep these things in mind:

Xenia, while beautiful, is almost a pest. It grows so quickly! Most people keep it isolated as much as possible - some keep it on a rock that's not connected to the rest of the rockwork, and some even just attach them to their glass or their mag-floats.

Torch corals are awesome, but they're aggressive - you're gonna have to place it where they can't sting any other corals, and that might be difficult in a small tank. I'd recommend a hammer coral as an alternative, due to their less aggressive nature and similar appearance.

Anemones are pretty amazing creatures. Some of them can live longer than humans, and they can be extremely colorful and lively, despite the fact that they're basically just blobs of algae and goo. They're some of the most resilient creatures on Earth - but, they're also incredibly sensitive. For that reason, they're almost never recommended for beginners, especially not in a super young tank. Water quality has to be pretty stable for them to thrive, and they aren't as simple as corals when it comes to keeping them healthy - BTAs will move around until they find a place they like, stinging corals and anything else that gets in their way. They sometimes injure themselves while moving, and it's not uncommon for them to simply not settle down in a tank with unstable conditions. They really need a tank that's at the very least 3-6 months old - even though a tank is cycled, doesn't mean it's established. A freshly cycled tank won't have the mass amount of microfauna that keeps most tanks healthy, and will be prone to swinging parameters until it ages, especially when you're just learning the ropes.

What lighting are you using? The stock lighting that comes with the Flex won't be adequate for any coral. What about circulation? The stock pump that comes with that tank won't be enough for a reef - you'll need to add at least one powerhead to the tank.
 
  • Thread starter
  • Thread Starter
  • #3

SomeoneFISHy

Valued Member
Messages
306
Reaction score
93
Points
38
Experience
1 year
Welcome to the salty side!

Respectfully, all those fish are going to be overstocked. Since it's your first tank, I'd recommend no more than 3 of the fish you listed - preferably 2. If it were me, I'd get a firefish first, and then get another fish after a month or two of the tank being set up. 15 gallons is doable, but it's not a lot to work with, especially in an AIO form factor.

Speaking from experience, avoid peppermint shrimp like the plague if you plan to have anemones or coral. I had to trap mine out of my tank because it was picking at my hammer coral and my Bubble Tip. They're pretty and cool, but I'd say they're only borderline reef-safe - it does come down to the individual, but it's not worth the risk. If you want a shrimp, I'd recommend a Blood Shrimp, as they're supposedly the least risky. But, all shrimp do pose a risk - they'll all try to steal food from your anemone and your corals, and it's up to you if you want to deal with that. I'd definitely add the shrimp after all the corals and anemone is established.

Emerald crabs and hermits can also be risky - they're opportunistic feeders. If they see an opportunity to eat (whether it's algae on your rocks or food in your coral's mouth) they're likely to take it - there's been more than one post online about people losing corals and anemones to crabs.

So, as for your coral list, it looks great! Keep these things in mind:

Xenia, while beautiful, is almost a pest. It grows so quickly! Most people keep it isolated as much as possible - some keep it on a rock that's not connected to the rest of the rockwork, and some even just attach them to their glass or their mag-floats.

Torch corals are awesome, but they're aggressive - you're gonna have to place it where they can't sting any other corals, and that might be difficult in a small tank. I'd recommend a hammer coral as an alternative, due to their less aggressive nature and similar appearance.

Anemones are pretty amazing creatures. Some of them can live longer than humans, and they can be extremely colorful and lively, despite the fact that they're basically just blobs of algae and goo. They're some of the most resilient creatures on Earth - but, they're also incredibly sensitive. For that reason, they're almost never recommended for beginners, especially not in a super young tank. Water quality has to be pretty stable for them to thrive, and they aren't as simple as corals when it comes to keeping them healthy - BTAs will move around until they find a place they like, stinging corals and anything else that gets in their way. They sometimes injure themselves while moving, and it's not uncommon for them to simply not settle down in a tank with unstable conditions. They really need a tank that's at the very least 3-6 months old - even though a tank is cycled, doesn't mean it's established. A freshly cycled tank won't have the mass amount of microfauna that keeps most tanks healthy, and will be prone to swinging parameters until it ages, especially when you're just learning the ropes.

What lighting are you using? The stock lighting that comes with the Flex won't be adequate for any coral. What about circulation? The stock pump that comes with that tank won't be enough for a reef - you'll need to add at least one powerhead to the tank.
Hello! Thanks for the feedback. I have a good filtration system, shoots water back in the tank, but not at the force of a powerhead. But... I DO have a powerhead! It makes average waves. The tank has super bright LEDS. I have a 3 media filter, powerhead, heater, protein skimmer, temperature sensor.

For the corals, I messed up. I was looking at my old list XD. I actually have buttons, bubbles, and hammers on there as well. I will remove the torch, since it is aggressive (I didn't know that they hurt others)

The tank that I posted would be the IDEAL, I didn't add that though. I know I am a beginner, and I would add everything slowly. I would also research on if I have good equipment. I don't want to give any discomfort to animals.
 

PoorBigBlue

Valued Member
Messages
435
Reaction score
348
Points
53
Experience
5 to 10 years
It sounds as if you still have a bit of looking to do in the filtration and flow department - there's a whole lot to learn!

So, in reef tanks, we do NOT use biological media (bio-rings, sponges, whatever) in our filter, other than maybe a small amount to keep cycled for a hospital tank. That media tends to catch debris, and as that debris breaks down, it'll cause nitrates and phosphates to rise - which is bad in a reef. For that reason, most people recommend that you use nothing that's going to catch much debris in your filter. A lot will use a chemical media, such as carbon or Chemipure, but other than that, you want your filter barren most of the time.

Do you know which powerhead you have? The flow rating (GPH) is important. I have around 575 GPH in my ten gallon, meaning that the water in my tank gets run through a powerhead or filter around 60 times per hour - and I STILL wish I had more flow sometimes! You definitely don't want to skimp in the flow department. I'd highly recommend you look into a Koralia Nano 425, if the one you have doesn't prove to be sufficient.

So, for lighting, you'll need more than just super bright LEDs. Corals are more demanding than what most freshwater lights can provide. You'll usually want a higher Kelvin light for saltwater - Kelvin being the temperature of the light, or how blue or red the light appears to our eyes. For freshwater, we usually want around 6500 Kelvin, or what's typically "daylight" - it appears as very white, clear light. For a reef, you want lights that are at least 10000K, or lights that appear slightly blue and very crisp. Corals make a lot of use out of the blue spectrum, and will really show a lot of color under the correct lighting. There are a lot of different lighting configurations out there - I recommend that you look around at other 15 gallon reefs people have built, and see what they're using. I'm using one of these over my 10 gallon: I'll be adding a second one at some point, so I think two of these positioned around a foot over your tank would do well.

The fish you listed aren't really incompatible due to the fact that you're a beginner - they're incompatible because that's really just too much for a 15 gallon. With each fish you add, waste is added to the tank. When you consider that all of your inverts, corals, anemones and fish are all producing waste, with that many fish you start to really run into water quality issues.
 

Jesterrace

Well Known Member
Messages
2,909
Reaction score
1,103
Points
198
Experience
1 year
As mentioned by others 3 fish would be th max for a 15 gallon. 15 gallons is small for a pair of clowns long term. Personally I would skip the firefish as they are the most likely to spend time hiding. I would go with a pair of clowns and either a goby or a Possum or Pink Streaked Wrasse, if you want something more unique.

As for corals definitely skip the Xenia unless you are looking for a single coral to overrun your tank. Admittedly I am a Euphyllia Coral (ie torch, hammer,frogspawn) but they do need room to grow. Here are mine for reference:

 
Last edited:

BottomDweller

Fishlore VIP
Messages
9,381
Reaction score
5,883
Points
448
Experience
5 to 10 years
Keep in mind that while the fluval flex can hold 15 gallons of water it offers very little swimming space for fish. The tank is only 16" long and the filter takes up quite a bit if space at the back of the tank. Once you have added your live rock that will be even less space. I would avoid clownfish.
 

Aqua Hands

Well Known Member
Messages
1,711
Reaction score
772
Points
158
Experience
2 years
IMO
I would do a clown fish pair + CUC.
You'll maybe have 9-10ish gallons of swimming water. This leaves no room for other fish due to territory and you're gonna max out your bioload. Then you can save more money for your corals also!
 
Toggle Sidebar

Aquarium Calculator

Follow FishLore!





Top Bottom