14G Reef Biocube.

lanlesnee

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What an easy tank to take care of. All I do is top it off with RO water, clean out the skimmer and glass. I don't feed or do anything else at all.


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lanlesnee

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zunedog31 said:
How much does a tank like this cost to make?
This one was free to me, given to me by a friend who just wanted out of the hobby.

But if I had to break it down into dollar values it would be:

Tank 100 dollars new from Ebay, comes with everything, but heat and skimmer.

Heater and skimmer were 20 dollars new

20 pounds of live rock 6 dollars pound already cure from local pet shop. So 120 dollars total in rock.

6 different corals 60 dollars. That's what a local shop would sell them for.

2 fanworms 15 each for a total of 30 dollars.

Chaetomorpha algae 10 dollars

So this tank with the prices around here would have cost me 340 to build.

But friend of my brought a little bigger one with tons more corals for 150 dollars.
 

Aquarist

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Good morning,

Not being a salt tank keeper myself, can you elaborate as to why you do not have to feed please.

Beautiful set up! Thanks for sharing the photos.

Ken
 

cm11599ps

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They don't have to feed because this is basically just a tank containing coral. Most of the coral we keep have an algae called zooxanthallae living in it's tissue that form a symbiotic relationship with the coral. The zooxanthellae converts the energy from our high power lights into food for itself. They are very efficient food producers that they actually produce too much food. This excess food is then utilized by the coral. The coral offers a predation free area for the zooxanthellae to grow and the zooxanthellae return that favor by feeding the coral.

Not all the coral we keep have this symbiotic relationship but most of the ones you see do. That's why you the OP states she doesn't need to feed the tank.

I also see what appears to be an astrea snail on the front glass. They will munch on the algae that naturally forms on your glass.

The only problem I see comes from your fan worms or "feather dusters." These guys do need to be fed things like rotifers and plankton to survive. The "feathers" they extend actually capture tiny food particles from the water column so I would strongly suggest you reconsider the "no feeding" aspect of this tank if you want to continue with the feather dusters.

Other then that, looks good.
 
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lanlesnee

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cm11599ps said:
They don't have to feed because this is basically just a tank containing coral. Most of the coral we keep have an algae called zooxanthallae living in it's tissue that form a symbiotic relationship with the coral. The zooxanthellae converts the energy from our high power lights into food for itself. They are very efficient food producers that they actually produce too much food. This excess food is then utilized by the coral. The coral offers a predation free area for the zooxanthellae to grow and the zooxanthellae return that favor by feeding the coral.

Not all the coral we keep have this symbiotic relationship but most of the ones you see do. That's why you the OP states she doesn't need to feed the tank.

I also see what appears to be an astrea snail on the front glass. They will munch on the algae that naturally forms on your glass.

The only problem I see comes from your fan worms or "feather dusters." These guys do need to be fed things like rotifers and plankton to survive. The "feathers" they extend actually capture tiny food particles from the water column so I would strongly suggest you reconsider the "no feeding" aspect of this tank if you want to continue with the feather dusters.

Other then that, looks good.
Couldn't have said it better myself, lol.
I've debated on feeding the feather dusters, but they are going on 3-4 months and they look better than ever. I have no luck with dusters in my other tanks that I feed, these are the last ones I have.
There are also at least 2 hermits and tons of copepods crawling around. I would think they would need to be feed, but they are also doing well.
There are some of the "pest" amptasia and bristle worms, but very few and I've been slowly getting rid of the amptasia.
 

cm11599ps

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If it works for you, great. There are many ways to keep tanks but I'd rather feed something to the tank a few times a week. Something like Reef Chili would be a great addition. Everything is your tank will eat it.
 
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